Discover Healthier Cooking Oils Now!

By Tom Seest

Alternatives to Seed Oil?

At SeedOilNews, we help people that are seed oil curious by collating information and news about seed oils.

Many individuals are concerned about the amount of seed oils in their diet. Some believe these oils contribute to inflammation and might increase risk factors like cardiovascular disease.
Are there healthier alternatives available that you could use instead of the unhealthy oils currently used? Below are a few great suggestions.

Alternatives to Seed Oil?

Alternatives to Seed Oil?

What Makes Applesauce a Great Seed Oil Substitute?

Applesauce can make baked goods moister and tenderer while simultaneously lowering fat content while remaining rich and flavorful, especially cakes, muffins, and soft-baked cookies. Aurora Health Care recommends substituting applesauce 1:1 with oil when creating recipes like these; to maximize moisture and flavour extraction from this ingredient. Since applesauce is quite watery, drain off some condensation before using it as an ingredient.
Applesauce is made by simmering whole apples until soft before blending them to either a chunky or smooth texture in a food processor, then seasoning to your taste – be it sweet or savory. Any type of apple can be used, including mixing different types together to achieve unique flavors. Many people also opt for adding spices like cinnamon for additional depth of flavor and nutritional benefits. Applesauce makes for a nutritious alternative to vegetable oils which may pose harmful risks if consumed regularly.
Cooking applesauce at home is easy: all it requires are apples, water and a bit of sugar for flavoring. For a savory version, add ground ginger or other herbs and spices while cooking; use a potato masher or fork to break apart cooked apples before pureeing using either a food processor or blender for an even mixture.
Store-bought applesauce may seem like an easy and convenient snack option, but it often contains high amounts of added sugars and inadequate levels of fiber. Furthermore, fresh apples contain quercetin which may help protect against heart disease, cancer and inflammatory diseases.

What Makes Applesauce a Great Seed Oil Substitute?

What Makes Applesauce a Great Seed Oil Substitute?

What Makes Pumpkin Seed Oil a Healthy Alternative?

Pumpkin seed oil (commonly referred to as pepita oil) is produced by either heat-pressing or cold-pressing the seeds of pumpkins (Cucurbita pepo), an annual relative of cucumbers and gherkins that grows worldwide. This nutty-tasting oil has been associated with heart health due to its abundance of monounsaturated fat and omega-3 fatty acids; furthermore it also provides essential antioxidants including Vitamin E which protect cells against free radical damage.
Its smoke point of about 320 degrees Fahrenheit makes it unsuitable for high-heat cooking; however, its flavorful qualities make it an excellent addition to salad dressings and marinades as well as drizzled over roasted vegetables. Furthermore, walnut oil adds an appealing nutty aroma and texture when blended into smoothies or homemade mayonnaise creation.
Pumpkin seed oil may be beneficial to those with sensitive skin as a facial moisturizer as it has the ability to soothe breakouts. Furthermore, pumpkin seed oil provides an ideal foundation for essential oil formulations. However, since pumpkin seed oil can thin out skin it should always be mixed with another carrier oil such as jojoba or argan before applying directly on hair and skin routines.
Though more research needs to be conducted, pumpkin seed oil has shown to provide relief for symptoms associated with menopause and prostate issues in males, such as an enlarged prostate or prostate cancer. It contains phytoestrogens – compounds similar to estrogen – which help balance hormones and prevent hot flashes.
Pumpkin seed oil can be purchased both as capsules and liquid. When storing a bottle in a dark area, to protect from exposure to light and heat. Otherwise it could go rancid over time, diminishing both its taste and nutritional value.

What Makes Pumpkin Seed Oil a Healthy Alternative?

What Makes Pumpkin Seed Oil a Healthy Alternative?

Why is Grapeseed Oil a Healthy Alternative?

Grapeseed oil is made from the seeds of specific varieties of grapes. It’s widely used in skincare formulations (creams and lotions), massage oils and carrier oils combined with essential oils because it’s light, non-greasy and antimicrobial. Furthermore, Plescia says grapeseed oil serves as an effective emollient that moisturizes skin to leave it looking firmer than ever.
Vitamin E, an effective antioxidant known to protect against sun damage and encourage collagen production, makes this lightweight moisturizer great for fine lines and wrinkles, Plescia notes. Plus it won’t contribute to clogged pores!” so this formula works especially well on acne-prone skin.
However, recent research suggests it contains too much omega-6 (linoleic acid) compared to omega-3 fats–an inequity that has been linked with inflammation and heart disease. Furthermore, most grocery stores sell 17-ounce bottles for around $10 or more.
If possible, opt for expeller-pressed or “virgin” grapeseed oil; it typically offers less refined taste with fruity, nutty or grassy notes and boasts brighter green colors.
Grapeseed oil can be used in much the same way as olive oil for cooking purposes, though keep in mind its higher smoke point may cause it to degrade at higher temperatures than some other oils. You can also use it on your hair and scalp, where its fatty acids help strengthen locks while simultaneously helping reduce dandruff. Massage it onto your head before washing to loosen clumps of dirt or flakiness before shampooing your locks!

Why is Grapeseed Oil a Healthy Alternative?

Why is Grapeseed Oil a Healthy Alternative?

What Are the Benefits of Sesame Seed Oil?

Sesame oil is an edible cooking oil commonly used to add flavor and texture to dishes. Produced by pressing or toasting plain seeds, sesame oil is often found in Chinese, Japanese, South Indian, and Middle Eastern cuisines – being popularly featured among them being Chinese cuisine, Japanese cuisine, South Indian cuisines as well as Middle Eastern. Oil produced from toasted seeds usually has darker hues with stronger flavors compared to raw sesame seeds; refined and unrefined varieties exist, the latter including sesamin and sesamolin which are antioxidant properties unique among oils produced from raw sesame seeds compared with raw sesame seeds that contain no sesamin or sesamolin which contain unique antioxidant properties for them whereas refined forms do not.
Sesame seed oil makes an excellent alternative to other forms of cooking oil because of its high smoke point and ability to be used at higher temperatures, along with its neutral flavor profile – it makes an excellent addition to any recipe calling for cooking oil and its distinct nutty aroma makes it perfect for salad dressings!
Unrefined sesame oil should be kept in a dark container with a tight-fitting lid in a cool location. Due to its high levels of polyunsaturates, which quickly go rancid when left stored out for too long, it should either be consumed quickly or placed in the fridge if you plan on keeping it around for extended periods of time.
This oil can help lower blood pressure, prevent heart disease and cancer, boost immunity and lower cholesterol. It may also be useful in relieving rheumatoid arthritis as it fights free radicals; reduce stress anxiety depression increase energy circulation promote hair growth prevent diabetes as well as act as massage oil for sore joints and muscles.

What Are the Benefits of Sesame Seed Oil?

What Are the Benefits of Sesame Seed Oil?

Why Should You Consider Using Ghee?

Butter is generally natural and adds creamy texture and delicious flavor to many dishes, but its high amount of saturated fats and cholesterol could increase risk for heart disease and clogged arteries. Each tablespoon of butter has over 100 calories; thus it should only be used sparingly instead of other forms of fats.
Oils like canola, olive and safflower contain healthy unsaturated fats and heart-nourishing omega-3 fatty acids that provide many of the same nutritional benefits found in butter. Although these oils can be used as replacements in many recipes, their heat tolerance is lower – taking extra caution not to burn them is key – plus they do not possess its distinctive savory taste which will only occasionally replace its use altogether.
For a healthier diet, look for spreadable butters made of a blend of butter and vegetable oil; they have half the saturated fat of traditional butter, making it more suitable for healthy living. You can find these at grocery stores and online retailers alike; unsalted varieties may help improve gluten development in baked goods while adding salt can throw off an otherwise harmonious dish’s balance of flavors.
If a recipe calls for creaming butter with sugar, oil isn’t usually an adequate replacement. Butter’s air bubbles help create a light and airy texture while oil doesn’t. Instead, try creating clarified butter by melting and removing milk solids before heating to produce ghee as an alternative that won’t burn at high temperatures; you can find this product at many gourmet food stores or health food shops.

Why Should You Consider Using Ghee?

Why Should You Consider Using Ghee?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.