The Hidden Health Risks Of Industrial Seed Oils

By Tom Seest

Are Industrial Seed Oils Bad for Your Health?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oils by collating information and news about seed oils.

Industrial seed oils such as canola, corn, soybean, rapeseed, and cottonseed oils are used in nearly all processed food on store shelves and are an important source of omega-6 fatty acids, which contribute to inflammation.
Contrary to olive, avocado, and butter products, margarines contain low levels of nutrients while being filled with chemical byproducts from refining processes that could potentially harm you. Therefore, it’s wise to stay away from them.

Are Industrial Seed Oils Bad for Your Health?

Are Industrial Seed Oils Bad for Your Health?

What are the Risks of Genetically Modified Industrial Seed Oils?

Industrial seed oils such as canola, corn, safflower, and soybean are an essential part of American diets, found everywhere, from fast foods and snacks to salad dressings and even salad dressings. Unfortunately, though they’re so ubiquitous, they should be avoided as much as possible for their unhealthy properties.
These foods come from genetically modified crops and undergo heavy processing, making them harmful to your health. In addition, their exposure to heat and light causes them to destabilize and produce potentially hazardous byproducts that oxidize into harmful chemicals that wreak havoc with your immune system and could potentially trigger allergies.
Oil industries promoted seed oils as healthy alternatives to saturated fats such as lard and butter. At that time, people were growing concerned with unsanitary meat production practices; vegetable oils could easily be sold as safer and purer. Furthermore, vegetable oils tend to be much cheaper for consumers, which makes them popular choices among restaurants and processed food companies alike.
Unfortunately, cheap processed vegetable oils have done irreparable harm to human health. They contribute to obesity, heart disease, high cholesterol, and numerous other health issues; furthermore, they promote cancer cell growth and cause inflammation; contrary to popular belief, they’re certainly not good for your body!
Seed oils are notoriously unstable and quickly oxidize when exposed to heat or light, producing toxic trans-fats and byproducts that are dangerous for your health. Furthermore, many of the seeds used to make seed oils may have been genetically modified, which raises serious questions regarding the long-term safety of use.
Industrial seed oils come from destructive mono-crop agriculture that depletes our soil and farmland. Instead, opt for more natural, nutritious oils like olive and cultured oil derived from whole foods with rich nutrients – they still offer omega-6 but don’t pose as many health risks due to chemical processing that often goes into conventional cooking oils.

What are the Risks of Genetically Modified Industrial Seed Oils?

What are the Risks of Genetically Modified Industrial Seed Oils?

How Can Industrial Seed Oils Lack Nutritional Value?

Industrial seed oils are produced from the seeds of various plants such as corn, cottonseed, safflower, and sunflower. Used extensively in processed foods and salad dressings due to their inexpensive production costs and high smoke point for cooking use, industrial seed oils are composed largely of omega-6 polyunsaturated, which have been associated with inflammation.
Overall, industrial seed oils aren’t great for our health. They are highly processed, contain numerous inflammatory fats, and boast a very high omega-6 to omega-3 ratio – contributing to heart disease risk, inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and mental health disorders, among other things.
To create these oils, plant seeds are first collected and heated at very high temperatures to oxidize unsaturated fatty acids contained within. Following this, these seeds are processed using petroleum-based solvents like hexane to maximize oil extraction from them; then, their extracted oils are bleached and deodorized using chemicals that further compromise their nutrition content.
Avoiding seed oils is easy. Just by switching up the items in your pantry with healthier alternatives like extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) and butter, you can significantly decrease your consumption of seed oils – and make an impactful difference to your overall health!
Furthermore, it would be wise to cut back on processed food made with oils like soybean or canola oil – this can help lower overall calorie consumption while giving you more opportunity to add in nutritious whole food sources that nourish the body!

How Can Industrial Seed Oils Lack Nutritional Value?

How Can Industrial Seed Oils Lack Nutritional Value?

What Are the Dangers of Refined Industrial Seed Oils?

People tend to rejoice when they discover they’ve reduced their oil intake, but industrial seed oils such as canola, soybean, cottonseed, and safflower are, in reality, very damaging to health. Refined and calorically dense, they contain harmful oxidized byproducts as well as synthetic preservatives and chemical residues, which could harm your well-being in many ways.
Seed oils are also produced from genetically modified crops resistant to herbicides like glyphosate that pose serious threats to both human and environmental health. Their fatty acids are highly vulnerable to oxidation – potentially contributing to cardiovascular disease, obesity, and chronic illnesses like diabetes and cancer.
Industrial seed oils have quickly made inroads into American diets despite their unhealthy characteristics, thanks to donations from vegetable oil manufacturers and dubious scientific studies. Marketed as healthier alternatives to olive oil, butter, and lard, they claim to be low in trans fat and cholesterol-free.
The problem with these processed, chemically derived vegetable oils is their high concentration of omega-6 fatty acids compared to anti-inflammatory omega-3 fats. Omega-3s are essential to cardiovascular health; they can lower blood pressure, decrease triglyceride levels, improve brain function, prevent cognitive decline and depression, and protect against cancer, while omega-6s can contribute to heart disease, autoimmune conditions, inflammation, and cancer.
Seed oils are ubiquitous, appearing in everything from cookies, crackers, and salad dressing to cookies and crackers, often used as cooking and frying oils. If you want to transition toward eating a whole food plant-based diet, one step should be switching out industrial seed oils for more nutrient-dense oils and fats like olive, avocado, and coconut oils.
Starting on your healthy cooking and baking journey can be intimidating, but our helpful guide can assist you on your way. Learn about what industrial seed oils are, how to identify them, and which alternatives might be healthier – but remember, balance is the key when it comes to nutrition!

What Are the Dangers of Refined Industrial Seed Oils?

What Are the Dangers of Refined Industrial Seed Oils?

Are Industrial Seed Oils Really Cheap?

Industrial seed oils (such as canola, corn, safflower, sunflower, and rapeseed oils) are inexpensive to produce, which has made them popular choices in everything from fast food and packaged foods to cooking oil – unfortunately, however, they’re also incredibly unhealthy for our bodies.
Industrial seed oils are produced by heating seeds at high temperatures that cause their fatty acids to oxidize, creating toxic byproducts and chemical residues that your body must deal with. Furthermore, bleaches and deodorizers may be added for further chemical residue removal, resulting in an energy-dense product with chemical residues and trans fats lingering throughout it.
Vegetable oil has become an indispensable component of American cuisine over recent years, replacing traditional fat sources like olive oil, coconut oil, butter, ghee, and lard with highly refined vegetable oils that many believe contribute to modern ailments like cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity.
Although industrial seed oils may have some association with diseases like cardiovascular and metabolic issues, it’s important to remember that they’re part of an unhealthy food package and should be limited or avoided altogether. Focusing on cutting back on processed food consumption while replacing it with more nutrient-rich unprocessed items is key.
Leave canola oil sitting out for even one week on the counter, and it will start to smell rancid due to high heat and refining processes altering its fatty acid structure. These altered fatty acids are toxic to your body and contribute to inflammation, cardiovascular disease, and other chronic illnesses. Luckily, you can easily make healthier substitutions for industrial seed oils by including more fruits, vegetables, and grass-fed meats in your diet – making these simple changes can reduce disease risks while improving overall well-being.

Are Industrial Seed Oils Really Cheap?

Are Industrial Seed Oils Really Cheap?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.