The Truth About Seed Oils

By Tom Seest

Are Seed Oils a Health Hazard?

At SeedOilNews, we help people that are seed oil curious by collating information and news about seed oils.

Recently there has been much discussion of seed oils on social media and podcasts. Some argue they can be toxic while others state otherwise.
Fact is, many factors can contribute to our health; one such factor is our diet choices. Therefore, it’s crucial that we are knowledgeable of all of the facts related to seed oils before making changes in our lifestyles.

Are Seed Oils a Health Hazard?

Are Seed Oils a Health Hazard?

What Harmful Chemicals Lurk in Seed Oils?

Seed oil critics often make wild claims about them being toxic; however, scientific evidence doesn’t back these up. A May 31, 2022 Consumer Reports article quoted experts who indicated there were no harmful health effects from using these oils.
Negative critics point to the use of hexane and heat in manufacturing, citing how these agents introduce chemical substances and unstable molecules that could turn seed oils into trans fats. But as hexane is only present for short amounts during processing and can easily be eliminated during disposal, its trace amounts likely won’t cause health issues.
Critics of seed oils argue that their high concentration of polyunsaturated fats contribute to inflammation in your body, leading to chronic diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular illness. But research shows otherwise; omega-6 fatty acids found in seed oils do not cause such inflammation.
If you’re seeking a healthier alternative, olive oil might be just what’s needed to meet your nutritional goals. Extra virgin olive oil boasts more essential vitamins and antioxidants than most other oils on the market, providing extra health benefits in one bottle!
Some have theorized that high levels of linoleic acid in seed oils cause an increase in inflammation in your body. While lab research does demonstrate its anti-inflammatory potential in mice and rats, however this doesn’t appear to be the case in humans.
Instead of worrying about increasing inflammation, try replacing industrial seed oils with healthier options like avocado, coconut and olive oils which contain plenty of essential vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.
These oils also remain more stable at high temperatures compared to safflower, soybean, sunflower and canola oils – making them suitable for use when frying, roasting, sauteeing or engaging in other methods of high heat cooking.
Overheated food also produces harmful trans-fats and lipid peroxides that can produce harmful trans-fats and lipid peroxides that damage DNA, proteins, membrane lipids in your body and lead to chronic illnesses.
Trans fats are one of the major sources of trans fats in our food supply and should be avoided at all costs. They’re found in most processed food and restaurant menus alike and contribute significantly to obesity.

What Harmful Chemicals Lurk in Seed Oils?

What Harmful Chemicals Lurk in Seed Oils?

Why Are Seed Oils So Controversial?

Since recent discussions surrounding seed oils’ potential harms have increased significantly, half-naked shirtless men in grocery stores and several podcasters and social media influencers have taken to claiming that seed oils pose risks to our health.
Seed oils have long been seen as sources of potentially unhealthy polyunsaturates, including linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids that have been linked with inflammation and chronic illness. Much of the evidence supporting this claim comes from animal lab studies; it remains to be seen if similar findings apply to human populations.
As part of its functioning, your body relies on certain fatty acids for optimal functioning, including omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. Achieve an equal ratio is critical in order to promote optimal health; making sure the ratio remains balanced will keep you feeling healthier overall.
Today’s diets contain far too much omega-6 to omega-3 ratio compared to that of our ancestors, leading to inflammation and chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer.
Consume a range of healthy fats derived from whole food sources instead of processed ones, in order to provide our bodies with adequate amounts of essential fatty acids. A great way of doing this is through following a balanced and healthy diet which includes plenty of vegetables, fruit and nuts as well as oil sources like extra virgin olive oil, avocado oil or seeds.
Your fat intake should contain both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids to promote health, so selecting an oil with both high concentrations of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and an abundance of omega-3 fatty acids such as canola or flax oil is vital.
Cold pressed oils provide another option for purchasing seed oils without heat or chemical extraction. Though more costly, cold pressed oils tend to be healthier alternatives due to containing no toxic substances.

Why Are Seed Oils So Controversial?

Why Are Seed Oils So Controversial?

Are Seed Oils Really That Unhealthy?

Internet-based posts and videos often allege that seed oils are toxic and bad for you, yet the science underlying such claims is more nuanced and complex than advertised. Paleo movement, clean eating, and conspiracy theories all come into play here.
American kitchens became increasingly reliant on industrial seed oils during the late 19th and early 20th centuries due to their lower costs, replacing natural fats such as butter and lard with industrial seed oils that provided an alternative option in American households.
At the turn of the 20th century, we became increasingly aware that saturated fats were linked to heart disease and other health conditions. Physiologists advised us to consume more polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) while decreasing our consumption of saturated fatty acids which were seen as unhealthy.
This has resulted in a major change to American diets, with saturated fats increasingly replaced by polyunsatured fatty acids (PUFAs) such that omega-6/omega-3 ratio has seen significant increases.
Consuming more polyunsaturated fats has been linked to reduced inflammation levels and lower risks for chronic diseases like heart disease and cancer, yet many individuals do not consume enough from food sources like fish, nuts, seeds, pasture-raised meats etc.
These fats contain predominantly omega-6s, while also providing some omega-3s. Achieve optimal health requires striking an appropriate balance between omega-6s and omega-3s.
Unfortunately, saturated fats become oxidized when heated and, over time, repeated heating may produce harmful byproducts such as trans-fats and lipid peroxides if used for deep frying in restaurants or at home. This is particularly true if seed oils are commonly used to deep-fry food items in restaurants or at home.
Avoid this by switching out overheated and oxidized cooking oils for high-oleic sunflower, rapeseed or olive oils with higher oleic content – never reuse your cooking oil – only purchase new containers at all times!
If you want to maximize the nutritional benefits of your food, choose unrefined oils with high nutrient density – like extra virgin olive and avocado oils – such as extra virgin olive and avocado oils. Doing this will ensure you are receiving an abundance of vitamins and minerals while also helping with weight management, as these fats have low-calorie densities.

Are Seed Oils Really That Unhealthy?

Are Seed Oils Really That Unhealthy?

Are Seed Oils Sabotaging Your Health?

When it comes to eating healthily, many of us receive advice to limit certain foods such as sugar, salt and processed goods. Although these substances can have negative consequences on health, we also need to make sure we get enough fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans nuts fish poultry plus enough heart-healthy fats in our diets.
An effective diet can do wonders for your health. Eating right can lower the risk of cancer and heart disease while improving long-term wellbeing.
Attributors that can affect our health range from genetics and lifestyle choices, to air pollution and food-borne toxins; with chronic illnesses like depression or anxiety compounding these problems even further. It’s therefore especially essential that we prioritize self-care.
Seed oils are an extract derived from plant seeds. Most often used for cooking purposes and can often be found in processed food items like salad dressings, baked goods and margarine.
Seed oils may be an everyday pantry essential, but too much of it could be harmful to your health. Luckily, there are ways you can lower your seed oil consumption.
First off, different oils can be used when cooking – avocado oil, extra virgin olive oil and extra virgin coconut oil are all fantastic choices for making delicious recipes. Furthermore, olive oil makes an excellent base for creating homemade salad dressings by combining with herbs.
Add nuts, seeds and lean meats to your diet for extra essential fatty acid intake that can help control cholesterol. These items provide essential fatty acids and can help lower your cholesterol levels.
Consume more omega-3 fatty acids to decrease inflammation in your body and decrease disease risks, so we advise including omega-3 rich foods like wild salmon, sardines, walnuts and flaxseed in your daily diet.
Seed oils often receive a bad reputation, but when consumed in moderation can actually be quite healthy. When added as part of a balanced diet that includes lots of fruits and vegetables, small amounts of seed oils may add flavor and texture to dishes.

Are Seed Oils Sabotaging Your Health?

Are Seed Oils Sabotaging Your Health?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.