The Surprising Truth About Seed Oils & Skin Health

By Tom Seest

Are Seed Oils Bad for Your Skin Health?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oil by collating information and news about seed oils.

If you have been following your health journey for any extended period, seed oils will have undoubtedly come up multiple times. From prepackaged food items and restaurants, to fast food joints and fast food chains.
There is some evidence to support that polyunsaturated fats, particularly omega-6s and 3s, can contribute to inflammation; however, such evidence relies heavily on small studies conducted on animals. Therefore, for optimal health, it’s crucial that your diet contains an equal ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids for overall wellbeing.

Are Seed Oils Bad for Your Skin Health?

Are Seed Oils Bad for Your Skin Health?

Is Linoleic Acid Good or Bad for Your Skin?

Linoleic acid, an omega-6 fatty acid found in many plant-based foods like vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, and whole grains, is not essential to good health; however, excessive consumption has been linked with inflammation-related conditions like heart disease, obesity, diabetes, and cancer.
Good news is there are ways to reduce linoleic acid intake! By simply eating a diet rich in low-fat dairy and lean meats, avoiding processed food, cooking with vegetable oils rich in linoleic acid and exercising regularly, you can significantly decrease your total linoleic acid consumption and bring down overall levels significantly.
Another effective strategy for lowering your intake of linoleic acid is switching out vegetable oils for healthier options like olive oil in recipes – doing this can reduce linoleic acid while keeping flavor intact!
Your body can reduce its linoleic acid intake by switching to healthier fats such as avocado, coconut oil and nut butters – these foods contain vitamin E, omega-3s and healthy lipids – that may help combat acne while avoiding deficiencies and improving skin health.
Linoleic acid can have serious repercussions for both humans and animals alike, in terms of increasing your risk for chronic disease as well as having devastating impacts on your brain. Studies show that high linoleic acid levels cause an increase in chemical production that signals pain; animal studies indicate this could even increase migraine headaches.
Other inflammatory conditions linked to increased levels of linoleic acid include fibromyalgia, arthritis, and asthma. Furthermore, it could contribute to depression or bipolar disorder.
If you suspect a deficiency of linoleic acid, see your physician and get tested. If you suffer from an autoimmune disease or inflammation such as arthritis, they may recommend an elimination diet with lots of nutrient-rich, low-fat foods in order to prevent linoleic acid deficiency.
In order to reduce linoleic acid levels in your body, select a diet rich in nutrient-rich foods, such as nuts and seeds, avocados and coconut oil. Avoiding fast food, high-fat snacks and fried foods is also key if you want to limit linoleic acid. You could also substitute some vegetable oils with healthier alternatives like Cultured Oil which is made by cultivating bacteria and fungi into an oil without linoleic acid content.

Is Linoleic Acid Good or Bad for Your Skin?

Is Linoleic Acid Good or Bad for Your Skin?

Are Polyunsaturated Fats Bad for Skin Health?

Search any search engine, and you will come across articles criticizing seed oils (canola, corn, cottonseed, soybean, sunflower, safflower grapeseed, and rice bran oils) as inflammatory and damaging. They have been associated with heart disease, diabetes, and autoimmunity, among other health problems.
There are various factors for this, most notably their high linoleic acid content – an omega-6 polyunsaturated fat which has often been maligned in nutrition industry circles but which is essential to healthy skin, and can reduce chronic inflammation risk, potentially lowering risk for autoimmune disorders and other serious medical issues.
Seed oils’ negative impacts include being high in free radical-producing oxidation-causing free radicals that contribute to skin oxidation, leading to wrinkles, dryness, and loss of elasticity. Over time, these free radicals damage collagen and elastin fibers and cause them to degrade; over time, this leads to wrinkles, dryness, and eventually, complete loss of elasticity in your skin.
Seed oils also increase your exposure to harmful aldehydes such as malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal, which contribute to skin aging while weakening immunity systems, leading to allergic reactions.
One of the more troubling aspects of seed oils is that they come largely from genetically modified crops, raising questions over their long-term safety. Furthermore, industrial seed oil manufacturers use chemicals to deodorize their oil while simultaneously producing trans fats during this process; both processes pose risks to heart health.
Seed oils are notoriously unstable when exposed to heat or sunlight, becoming increasingly unstable over time and losing their vitamin E content over time. To avoid this risk and ensure optimal health benefits for yourself and others, olive oil, avocado oil or coconut oil should be substituted as industrial seed oils as an important part of a whole food diet that includes plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables.

Are Polyunsaturated Fats Bad for Skin Health?

Are Polyunsaturated Fats Bad for Skin Health?

Can Seed Oils Boost Your Skin’s Antioxidants?

Seed oils contain antioxidants and essential fatty acids that make them great for the skin, including linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid, two polyunsaturated fatty acids that play an integral part in maintaining healthful skin. Without them, skin would quickly thicken up and become flaky; hence why their importance cannot be overstated.
Seed oils may also contribute to oxidative stress that damages the heart due to omega-6 fatty acids present in refined seed oils, which increase oxidative stress levels and lead to inflammation and subsequent heart damage.
That is why it is best to opt for foods rich in anti-inflammatory nutrients and omega-3 fats as opposed to oil consumption in large amounts.
Important to keep in mind is that inflammatory fatty acids found in seed oils represent only a portion of overall dietary fat consumption, including trans and rancid fats sourced from animal products like dairy and meat products.
If you want to decrease the risk of inflammation, the key lies in eating nutritious foods low in saturated and trans fats, like whole-grain breads, nuts, seeds, and fish, as well as plenty of fruits and vegetables that contain vitamins and minerals.
Seed oils pose another significant health concern as they often contain additives and are processed using toxic hexane chemicals that could potentially contribute to obesity and heart disease. These toxins may even play a part in their formation.
Seed oil can also be heated at high temperatures, producing trans and hydrogenated fats that could potentially pose health hazards. While this might not pose as much of a concern in your own kitchen at home, commercial kitchens could pose more severe dangers when using seed oils on an ongoing basis.
Of course, many claims you see online about seed oils are based on preclinical research that can’t be extrapolated to humans – and could lead to overconsumption of potentially unhealthy fatty acids in large doses.

Can Seed Oils Boost Your Skin's Antioxidants?

Can Seed Oils Boost Your Skin’s Antioxidants?

Are Omega-6 Rich Seed Oils Good For Your Skin?

Spend any time browsing social media, and you’re likely to come across posts warning people against seed oils. This is due to studies linking seed oils with everything from heart disease and diabetes to autoimmunity and even autoimmunity.
These oils contain omega-6, an anti-inflammatory fatty acid. While omega-6 may be beneficial in moderation, overeating it could become toxic to your body.
Ideal, you should consume oils that offer both omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids in equal proportions to promote optimal body balance and reduce inflammation.
Unfortunately, most seed oils we consume today contain an imbalanced ratio between omega-6 and omega-3. This imbalance may contribute to heart disease and other chronic disorders; additionally it may aggravate skin conditions by leading to inflammation.
Oxidative stress caused by these seed oils should also be of great concern since their antioxidant reserves become depleted quickly when used regularly and can increase oxidative damage over time.
Ozone pollution causes free radicals to form, which in turn damage DNA and proteins while speeding up aging processes – leading to potentially severe health conditions as a result.
Replace unhealthy fats with more heart-friendly options like coconut oil and butter, which have less processed ingredients and can be used in cooking, but contain small amounts of saturated fats that could harm your heart.
Select a high quality oil with an appropriate fatty acid profile and no harmful additives; such oils tend to be more costly but their health advantages make them worthwhile investments.
If you’re seeking out healthy oils, choose either olive or extra virgin coconut oil as they contain important nutrients and have clinical research supporting their benefits.

Are Omega-6 Rich Seed Oils Good For Your Skin?

Are Omega-6 Rich Seed Oils Good For Your Skin?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.