The Surprising Truth About Seed Oils & Skin

By Tom Seest

Are Seed Oils Bad for Your Skin?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oil by collating information and news about seed oils.

Pomegranate seed oil is an indispensable remedy for healthy and radiant skin, helping lighten dark circles, fade scars, even out skin tone, and prevent sun damage.
While internet allegations against the “hateful eight” (canola, corn, safflower, soybean, cottonseed, and peanut oils) may suggest they are toxic, scientific research does not confirm these assertions.

Are Seed Oils Bad for Your Skin?

Are Seed Oils Bad for Your Skin?

How Can Omega-6 Fats Impact Your Skin?

An excess of omega-6 fats and inadequate intake of omega-3 fats have been shown to contribute to inflammation. Seed oils like canola, rapeseed, soybean, sunflower, corn, and safflower contribute significantly to your omega-6 intake because they’re used extensively in processed food products.
One major worry with industrial seed oils is their conversion into arachidonic acid, leading to inflammation in the body. Other concerns claim these seed oils clog pores and cause breakouts (even though most skin experts dispute this theory) or can even cause acne-causing comedones when applied directly onto skin.
Some individuals also fear that seed oils contain toxic elements due to being extracted using chemical solvents like hexane. But most seed oil manufacturers go through rigorous quality checks that ensure these risks don’t pose too great of an issue – more of an issue occurs when these oils are heated at high temperatures in deep fryers or reused over and over (read more: Why Hexane is Toxic Chemical.)

How Can Omega-6 Fats Impact Your Skin?

How Can Omega-6 Fats Impact Your Skin?

Are Saturated Fats Bad for Your Skin?

Seed oils have recently come under scrutiny in the health and wellness community due to their purported high content of omega-6 fats, which, once converted, may trigger inflammation and chronic diseases.
Industrial seed oils are highly processed and contain harmful by-products such as oxidized byproducts, trans fats and chemical residues that may harm human health. Used in everything from salad dressings to frozen dinners – many contain GMOs!
Some have also speculated that polyunsaturated fatty acids found in oils are unhealthy, leading to diseased arteries and heart attacks. However, this belief was founded on flawed research; the original lab animal study was used as evidence. Furthermore, studies show a healthy balance of omega-6 and omega-3 fats have been linked with reduced inflammation levels; you can reap all these same health benefits by eating whole foods such as avocados, olive oil, or butter; just make wise selections when selecting your supplements.

Are Saturated Fats Bad for Your Skin?

Are Saturated Fats Bad for Your Skin?

Which Seed Oils are High in Linoleic Acid?

Many have heard that seed oils such as canola, safflower, sunflower, corn, soybean and peanut are detrimental to health. This is due to their high amounts of omega-6 linoleic acid content which may trigger pro-inflammatory chemicals within your body.
Industrial seed oils should be avoided for obvious health reasons; however, this may prove challenging as they’re commonly found in processed foods and restaurant meals (often heated up again before being served to customers).
Seed oils are highly refined, meaning that they contain trans fats, oxidized fats and chemical residues; no wonder then that these calories-packed but nutritionally empty oils have no redeeming features whatsoever!
Your good news is, replacing these inflammatory oils in your diet with healthier options is simple! Try switching up to avocado or olive oils when cooking and limiting processed food and restaurant dishes cooked with industrial seed oils; by doing this you will give your skin some much-needed relief while increasing omega-3 intake which are both heart healthy and anti-inflammatory.

Which Seed Oils are High in Linoleic Acid?

Which Seed Oils are High in Linoleic Acid?

Why Is Oleic Acid Unhealthy For Your Skin?

Google “seed oils” and you will come up with claims of inflammation and gut damage; yet many Americans consume large amounts of vegetable oils like canola, rapeseed (derived from canola), cottonseed, safflower, sunflower and peanut oil daily through fast food, restaurant meals and supermarket ready meals as well as natural, organic plant-based and vegan skin care products.
Seed oils contain omega-6 fatty acids, a type of polyunsaturated fat not directly associated with inflammation but capable of turning into arachidonic acid metabolite, making them potentially pro-inflammatory. Some health practitioners advise avoiding them and opting instead for beef tallow, which has a similar structure as your own body sebum and more stable temperatures to remain fresh for extended use without turning rancid quickly.
Some seed oils with higher concentrations of oleic acid have been touted as more nutritious. Examples include mid-oleic sunflower oil (65% oleic) and high-oleic sunflower oil (88% oleic). Both oils were developed using traditional plant breeding techniques and found to offer greater oxidative stability and nutritional profiles than conventional oil products.

Why Is Oleic Acid Unhealthy For Your Skin?

Why Is Oleic Acid Unhealthy For Your Skin?

Linolenic Acid: How Does It Impact Your Skin?

Seed oils should be avoided for numerous reasons, with omega-6 fat content being one of them. As nutritionists have long acknowledged, our bodies require a balance of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats – including omega-3s for improved cardiovascular health.
Consuming too many omega-6 fats from seed oils, however, can disrupt this equilibrium and lead to pro-inflammatory chemical production by the body. Linoleic acid – one of the key omega-6s found in these oils – is quickly converted by the liver into arachidonic acid, which serves as the building block for pro-inflammatory compounds.
Some social media influencers advise eschewing seed oils such as canola, safflower, corn cottonseed, and sunflower in favor of olive oil, coconut oil, and butter as they claim these are more inflammatory, damaging to the gut, contain undesirable components formed during refining and contain hazardous components formed during production – but the evidence does not support such claims. Furthermore, they are vulnerable to oxidation that produces toxic byproducts, which could contribute to debilitating diseases like cancer and Alzheimer’s.

Linolenic Acid: How Does It Impact Your Skin?

Linolenic Acid: How Does It Impact Your Skin?

Are Monounsaturated Fats Unhealthy for Your Skin?

Seed oils such as canola, corn, safflower, soy, and sunflower typically contain monounsaturated fats (MUFAs) – solid at room temperature, which makes them perfect for cooking!
Too much consumption of MUFAs leads to an imbalance of omega-6/omega-3 fat conversion in the body and has been linked to inflammation-based chronic conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease.
Seed oils are often highly processed, leading to exposure to harmful trans fats and byproducts from their heating process. Furthermore, their extraction often uses toxic solvents like hexane, which leave chemical residues behind and pose environmental concerns. By choosing whole food alternatives like nuts, seeds, avocados, grass-fed meats, wild-caught fatty fish, and olive oil instead, you can ensure greater health protection while simultaneously getting more of what your body needs for good fat intake.

Are Monounsaturated Fats Unhealthy for Your Skin?

Are Monounsaturated Fats Unhealthy for Your Skin?

Are Omega-3 Fats Bad for Your Skin?

Omega-3 fats have long been considered anti-inflammatory fats that help reduce inflammation and boost heart health, but balance must always be observed between omega-3s, MUFAs and PUFAs for optimal results. Seed oils such as canola oil contain large quantities of linoleic acid which the body converts to pro-inflammatory arachidonic acid resulting in pro-inflammatory symptoms in its entirety.
While an occasional French fry or salad dressing made with seed oils won’t cause irreparable harm to your health, eating them on a regular basis – as part of an ultra-processed food diet – could contribute to an imbalance between omega-6 and omega-3 fats in the body and drive systemic inflammation, increasing the risk for disease.
Refining processes subject seed oils to high heat and pressure, leading them to break down into toxic by-products such as dimethylpolysiloxane. One effective way of avoiding such harmful chemicals is cooking at home instead of dining out at restaurants where frying oils could have been heated multiple times over. Doing this also allows you to limit both calories and trans fat intake that come with restaurant fare.

Are Omega-3 Fats Bad for Your Skin?

Are Omega-3 Fats Bad for Your Skin?

Why is Linolenic Acid Bad for Your Skin?

Omega-3s often garner all of the praise when it comes to fats. But omega-6 fatty acids also play a significant role in inflammation; industrial seed oils (such as canola, corn, cottonseed, safflower, soybean sunflower, and grapeseed oils) contain particularly high concentrations of this inflammatory form of omega-6s.
These oils are refined, meaning their phytochemicals and antioxidants have been stripped out. Furthermore, they’re heated at high temperatures, so they oxidize rapidly; when this happens, they produce harmful byproducts, which ultimately become rancid and create hazardous byproducts that become toxic byproducts.
Linoleic acid from these oils can be converted by our bodies into arachidonic acid, an important building block of pro-inflammatory chemicals. Therefore, too much linoleic acid promotes chronic inflammation; however, multiple clinical studies have demonstrated that eating the appropriate balance of omega-6 and omega-3 fats reduces inflammation and improves health; ideal sources include avocado, olive oil, beef tallow or Zero Acre Farms’ Cultured Oil which contains heart-healthy monounsaturates with naturally low levels of linoleic acid content.

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.