Unlocking the Truth About Seed Oils.

By Tom Seest

Are Seed Oils Beneficial Or Harmful for Health?

At SeedOilNews, we help people that are seed oil curious by collating information and news about seed oils.

Seed oils are often found in unhealthy food products like french fries and packaged snacks that are high in sodium, sugar and refined carbohydrates. Furthermore, omega-6 fats found in seed oils may trigger chronic inflammation due to body conversion into arachidonic acid from omega-6 linoleic acid.
Seed oils provide beneficial omega-3 and omega-6 fats in moderation; however, when used as part of ultra-processed and fast food items they can increase risk for disease.

Are Seed Oils Beneficial Or Harmful for Health?

Are Seed Oils Beneficial Or Harmful for Health?

Why Should You Care About Omega-6 Fatty Acids?

Up until recently, nutrition experts generally considered seed oils (such as canola, soybean, sunflower, safflower cottonseed and corn) an integral part of a balanced diet. But now a number of well-known health influencers have started calling out these products as potentially inflammatory and even dangerous components of our daily lives.
Seed oil critics claim that these oils contain high concentrations of omega-6 fatty acids that are pro-inflammatory. Furthermore, these omega-6s can be converted to arachidonic acid in the body and turn into pro-inflammatory arachidonic acid over time – something they claim can contribute to heart disease, diabetes and depression among other things.
Critics cite mostly animal studies; therefore, its evidence remains inconclusive as to whether these fats cause inflammation in humans. Furthermore, some studies used raw animal fats which may even be more inflammatory than processed seed oils.
Critics of seed oils often express concern that seed oils are susceptible to oxidation, leading to toxic compounds that promote inflammation and toxicity in the body. Furthermore, high temperatures or repeated frying damage these oils quickly making them rancid over time.
Oils such as corn oil can quickly oxidize when exposed to high heat, so it is crucial that they are stored correctly and away from direct sunlight. They should also not be used for deep frying as this may damage pans and cause food particles to stick; alternative cooking oils like olive or ghee would make better choices for deep frying.
Although seed oils contain high concentrations of omega-6 fatty acids, they also provide essential fatty acids that your body requires for absorption of vitamin D, improved blood lipid levels, lowering blood pressure and protection against irregular heartbeats as well as brain health and cell repair. But remember: use seed oils sparingly alongside plenty of whole and nutritious food sources.

Why Should You Care About Omega-6 Fatty Acids?

Why Should You Care About Omega-6 Fatty Acids?

Why are Seed Oils Susceptible to Oxidation?

Seed oils refined at high temperatures are more prone to oxidation during their refinement process, leaving them more vulnerable to oxidation. Once oxidation occurs, harmful hydroxides and aldehydes are produced, leading to cell damage as well as inflammation and potentially carcinogenic processes – making seed oils bad for health overall. This is why using them regularly is harmful.
Canola, safflower, sunflower and corn oil are the four primary seed oils most often employed in food preparation. These oils are used in french fries, onion rings and other processed food items as well as being present in granola bars, cookies and cereals. Though these seed oils have long been staples of restaurant kitchens, healthier alternatives such as olive and coconut oils could provide viable replacements.
Experts are concerned that replacing seed oils with animal fats such as tallow and butter could be detrimental to health. While vegetable oils contain essential omega-3 fats that provide benefits, animal fats are richer in healthy omega-3s with far fewer risks of oxidation than their vegetable counterparts.
Seed oils often lack essential monounsaturated fatty acids that promote cardiovascular wellness, such as heat-stable monounsaturates with neutral flavors that provide heart protection. Omega-3 fats found in whole food sources such as fish or supplements should also be prioritized to maximize brain and cardiovascular wellbeing.
Although most seed oils are refined, some unrefined varieties exist as well. These oils retain phenols and other plant compounds which provide protection from heat. Furthermore, these less expensive versions tend to be less costly than their refined counterparts which may cost more when cooking with them.
Though popular, seed oils may not be as reliable as one would assume. Oxidation damages not only the body but also diminishes their flavor and nutritional value. Furthermore, this process contributes to developing chronic inflammatory conditions like cardiovascular disease or diabetes.
Overall, it is best to avoid these unhealthy fats entirely and instead opt for higher-quality vegetable oils like olive oil, coconut oil or ghee in everyday cooking. Also try avoiding foods containing hexane and other chemicals frequently added to seed oils; you’ll find plenty of these options at local grocery stores or online.

Why are Seed Oils Susceptible to Oxidation?

Why are Seed Oils Susceptible to Oxidation?

How Can You Reduce Inflammation in Your Body?

Seed oils are an abundant source of the omega-6 fat linoleic acid, which has been linked with inflammation. Unfortunately, many seed oils are also susceptible to oxidation — a reaction which releases harmful compounds like free radicals — particularly canola and sunflower oils that are commonly used for cooking due to their high smoke point; when exposed to oxygen they become rancid and toxic, leading to chronic health conditions and contributing to further inflammation.
Seed oils that cause inflammation have been linked with various conditions, including heart disease, diabetes, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease; furthermore it has also been linked with skin issues like psoriasis, eczema and acne. Therefore it is wise to opt for healthier oils like olive or coconut oil instead.
Though seed oils may be considered inflammatory, small amounts are still an acceptable part of a balanced diet. According to several clinical studies, higher intakes of omega-6 fats correlate with reduced rates of inflammation; however, other types of fats such as trans and oxidized fats can be more detrimental.
Many people use vegetable oils in salad dressings, sauteing vegetables and baking. Furthermore, fast-food restaurants and commercial fryers frequently employ these oils in their fryers. Unfortunately, using these oils regularly can result in an imbalance between omega-3 and omega-6 ratios in your body, leading to chronic inflammation.
Some individuals mistakenly believe that seed oils contain hazardous chemicals like hexane, synthetic antioxidants and trans fats; however, most quality-tested oils undergo rigorous quality tests prior to being sold to consumers, in order to weed out any contaminants which might harm our health and remove hexane used for deep frying (which often goes by law).
Seed oils do contain some detrimental constituents, but their negative impacts are far less dangerous than other fats. While trans and oxidized fats have been linked with serious diseases, seed oils have proven either neutral or beneficial effects on health.

How Can You Reduce Inflammation in Your Body?

How Can You Reduce Inflammation in Your Body?

How Can Seed Oils Fuel Your Sugar Cravings?

People often think switching to low-fat vegetable oils was making healthier decisions, but in truth these oils often contain excess sugar and unhealthy fats, not to mention chemicals like hexane which are toxic for human health. Now is the time to purge your pantry of any canola, safflower cottonseed sunflower soybean or corn oil bottles from your pantry!
Social media influencers have widely denounced seed oils such as canola (rapeseed), corn, grape-seed, sunflower, rice bran, safflower and cottonseed as potentially toxic and linked them to headaches, foggy thinking, reduced immunity levels, heart disease, type 2 diabetes as well as weight gain.
Problematic oils are those which are highly processed. Additionally, they’re high in omega-6 fatty acids – essential but must be balanced out by omega-3 fats from fish and nuts to achieve optimal health. In their production process, seeds may be heated at high temperatures with harmful chemicals like hexane which expose them to oxygen and may result in oxidation and toxic byproducts that could eventually endanger your health.
Furthermore, these oils are commonly used in restaurants that reheat them multiple times, further diminishing their quality and producing harmful byproducts such as aldehydes that contribute to inflammation or cancer risk.
Some individuals who have stopped using these oils report more energy and a healthier diet, likely as a result of eating fewer ultra-processed and fried food products. It’s certainly beneficial to limit intake of ultra-processed and fried foods; but even more beneficial would be eliminating refined sugar, salt, and saturated fats that often lurk in packaged goods.
Cooking meals yourself allows you to keep track of how much seed oils you ingest, while olive and avocado oils offer healthier cooking alternatives if this oil is unavailable in your pantry. For further peace of mind, more wholesome sources of fats such as fatty meats or dairy may also be better options.

How Can Seed Oils Fuel Your Sugar Cravings?

How Can Seed Oils Fuel Your Sugar Cravings?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.