Unlock the Health Benefits Of Seed Oils

By Tom Seest

Are Seed Oils Good for Your Health?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oil by collating information and news about seed oils.

Seed oils have long been used as the go-to fat source in fast food and processed meals, leading to unhealthy eating patterns and contributing to obesity.
Seed oils pose many health concerns, particularly omega-6 fatty acids, but occasional consumption will likely not pose any harm. However, regularly consuming these oils could cause inflammation and other issues.

Are Seed Oils Good for Your Health?

Are Seed Oils Good for Your Health?

Are Omega-6 Fatty Acids Healthy?

Seed oils (also referred to as vegetable oil) come from various seeds such as soybeans, canola (rapeseed in the United States), sunflower, cottonseed, and corn. They comprise an important part of American diets and are commonly used to replace saturated fat in most foods.
Contrary to what may have been heard, these oils are not toxic and haven’t been linked to any serious health concerns in recent studies. One potential drawback may be higher amounts of inflammatory fats compared to omega-3-rich ones; this may increase risk factors for heart disease and cancer.
Linoleic acid, the most frequently found polyunsaturated fat found in seed oils, is widely considered an excellent source of anti-inflammatory omega-6s. When broken down by your body into GLA it has similar anti-inflammatory effects as omega-3 fatty acids.
Linoleic acid can be obtained from various food sources, including safflower oil, flaxseed meal, walnuts and even chia seeds. Furthermore, plant-based sources like evening primrose oil, borage seed oil or black currant seed oil also offer ample amounts of this essential fatty acid.
Many experts consider modern Western diets to be excessive in omega-6 fatty acids while lacking sufficient omega-3s, leading to inflammation and driving systemic disease; thus, maintaining an appropriate ratio between the two is critical.
Numerous large and well-conducted studies have demonstrated the importance of omega-6s to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease, depression, arthritis and cancer. But it’s important to keep in mind that omega-6 fatty acids alone don’t account for these conditions – rather your overall diet matters most when considering your overall health status.
While some foods may be more inflammatory than others, the real source of inflammation comes from ultra-processed dietary staples that lack antioxidants and other essential nutrients to ward off oxidative damage – leading to chronic inflammatory diseases and industrial seed oils being among the major contributors to such imbalance.

Are Omega-6 Fatty Acids Healthy?

Are Omega-6 Fatty Acids Healthy?

What are the Benefits of Linoleic Acid?

Are you thinking about using seed oils as health supplements? You may be surprised to know that most varieties contain high concentrations of linoleic acid – an anti-inflammatory polyunsaturated fat linked to numerous conditions, including heart disease and diabetes.
Linoleic acid can lead to serious health complications, including cancer and Alzheimer’s disease, so experts now advise limiting consumption by choosing foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids and other healthier oils as alternatives.
Linoleic acid can be found primarily in vegetable oils, although it’s also present in nuts, seeds, and meat products. Linoleic acid is an essential fatty acid, meaning our bodies don’t produce it themselves.
Linoleic acid can be found in vegetable oils like canola oil, corn oil, and safflower oil, which are widely used for cooking purposes and are found in most prepared and packaged food items.
These oils contain both monounsaturated and saturated fatty acids, with some polyunsaturated fats included as well. The linoleic acid found in these oils is converted to arachidonic acid, which has been linked to inflammation and other health conditions.
Consuming too much linoleic acid can cause it to accumulate in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and red blood cells – an inflammatory process that may take years or more for certain tissues but can be reversed through reduced diet, consumption of omega-3 rich oils and foods like fatty fish as well as other ways of decreasing your linoleic acid consumption such as consumption of fatty fish or foods rich in linoleic acid reduction (e.g. consuming more omega three rich oils or foods that reduce linoleic acid content).
Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process that contributes to heart disease. This condition involves the buildup of plaques composed of cholesterol and lipid deposits such as linoleic acid that decrease oxygen and other essential nutrients from reaching the heart, making proper function difficult for it.
To lower your risk of atherosclerosis, one effective strategy is eating a diet that includes less linoleic acid and more healthy oils, like olive oil and fatty fish. You should also reduce consumption of processed foods that are high in linoleic acid content while reading labels carefully to identify hidden linoleic acid content in food labels.

What are the Benefits of Linoleic Acid?

What are the Benefits of Linoleic Acid?

Cholesterol: How Does it Impact Seed Oils?

Seed oils contain healthy polyunsaturates such as linoleic and alpha-linolenic fatty acids that have been proven to lower cholesterol and decrease inflammation in the body.
Seed oils can also be an abundant source of saturated and trans inflammatory fats that contribute to inflammation in your body. Found commonly in processed and fast foods, their high content of unhealthy fats increases your risk for cardiovascular disease.
Seed oils can be part of a nutritious diet when used sparingly and in conjunction with other healthy fats from whole foods such as nuts, seeds and avocados. You can even cook with them; just ensure it’s unrefined cold pressed oil without added chemicals or preservatives.
To combat cholesterol found in seed oils, try eating an assortment of fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds daily – these foods contain plant sterols and stanols which may help lower total and LDL cholesterol levels.
Low-fat or non-fat dairy products such as 1% milk and non-fat yogurt may also help you reach your weight goals while increasing plant sterols and stanol intake without increasing overall fat consumption.
To promote optimal heart health, try eating a diet rich in fresh fruit and vegetables, whole grains, and legumes, as well as low-fat or non-fat dairy products, with one to three servings of red meat per week limited and the addition of omega-3-rich oily fish such as salmon.
Lukas Schwingshackl and colleagues used a new technique called network meta-analysis to consolidate multiple clinical studies regarding how different dietary oils affect blood lipids. Their findings suggested that seed oils were particularly effective at lowering LDL cholesterol and triglycerides while being less beneficial in terms of HDL levels.

Cholesterol: How Does it Impact Seed Oils?

Cholesterol: How Does it Impact Seed Oils?

How Much Saturated Fat is in Seed Oils?

If you follow social media or popular diet books, chances are good that you have heard that seed oils are detrimental to health. Posts stating their consumption increases inflammation which in turn can cause leaky gut, brain fog, weight gain and other serious issues.
Truth be told, seed oils can be part of a healthy, balanced diet when included as part of a variety of saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fats – just make sure that they’re part of it all! They are packed full of essential vitamins and can help lower cholesterol, reduce heart disease risk, and even help manage blood sugar levels more effectively.
Seed oils contain essential omega-3 fatty acids that have been shown to reduce inflammation in the heart and other organs, according to the American Heart Association (AHA).
Seed oils should be handled carefully as they’re susceptible to oxidization when heated to high temperatures – such as in restaurant deep-fryers. Reheating or using over their smoke point can cause fats in them to break down, creating potentially carcinogenic compounds which could lead to cancer and other illnesses.
However, there are ways to limit your intake of seed oils. First and foremost, we should limit packaged snacks containing seed oils like granola bars, breads with added oils, dried fruits, or baked chips that often contain them.
These foods tend to be high in calories, refined carbohydrates and sodium – and cutting back may make you feel better overall, according to Crosby.
When selecting seed oils, try to do so in moderation and select cold-pressed or expeller-pressed varieties, as these contain more antioxidants than their regular counterparts.
One way you can reduce oil intake is simply not buying them in the first place – as many processed foods, which you might not normally consider healthy, may contain them.
Many granola bars, crackers, and certain breads sold in stores or online are packed with these oils; that is when their health risks begin.

How Much Saturated Fat is in Seed Oils?

How Much Saturated Fat is in Seed Oils?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.