The Truth About Seed Oils

By Tom Seest

Are Seed Oils Harmful?

At SeedOilNews, we help people that are seed oil curious by collating information and news about seed oils.

Nutritionists and dietitians frequently post on social media that seed oils are harmful. According to them, these oils cause obesity and type 2 diabetes.
Truth be told, seed oils can be beneficial in moderation to heart health.

Are Seed Oils Harmful?

Are Seed Oils Harmful?

Why Should You Be Cautious of Omega-6 Fatty Acids?

Seed oil has long been touted as potentially dangerous. While you might view this claim as mere conspiracy theory, research proves otherwise.
Seed oil stands out from other fats by being high in omega-6 fatty acids, polyunsatured fats essential to our diets but which can increase inflammation if eaten excessively.
Omega-6 fatty acids can be obtained in various ways, with foods like nuts, seeds and fish providing ample sources. Furthermore, vegetable oils like canola oil, safflower oil, sunflower oil and soybean oil may provide adequate sources.
If inflammation is a concern for you, one way to lower its risks is by ensuring the ratio between omega-6 and omega-3 fats is correct – an optimal value range should be between 2:1 to 4:1.
One way to reach this balance is to switch out industrial seed oils with high levels of omega-6 fatty acids for healthier vegetable oils like olive, avocado and flaxseed that have lower oxidative capacity than industrial seeds – meaning less chance for inflammation in your body.
Avoid processed foods, which tend to contain industrial seed oils and other pro-inflammatory ingredients, to keep inflammation under control and lower your chances of chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes.
Seed oil can increase inflammation while being toxic for both you and the environment, so it’s wise to limit its consumption and replace it with healthier options like coconut, avocado or wild-caught fatty fish.
Seed oil poses the main danger to our diet: an imbalance between omega-6 and omega-3 ratios can lead to high blood pressure, inflammation and poor brain health – all which should be addressed through whole food sources such as nuts, seeds and vegetables.

Why Should You Be Cautious of Omega-6 Fatty Acids?

Why Should You Be Cautious of Omega-6 Fatty Acids?

What’s the Harm in Consuming Seed Oil?

Seed oil may help increase inflammation, according to a new study. Omega-6s found in seed oils such as linoleic acid may be converted by our bodies into arachidonic acid, which leads to pro-inflammatory chemical production in our systems and has been implicated in chronic conditions ranging from type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer.
An increasing number of health experts caution that excessive consumption of omega-6 fatty acids found in seed oil may be harmful to one’s health. Excess omega-6 intake increases inflammation risk and contributes to chronic conditions like heart disease, arthritis and cancer.
There are ways to avoid seed oils completely. First, select a reliable source for your cooking oil; avocado or coconut oils could make better choices than refined seed oils such as soybean or canola oil.
Refining oil removes healthy phytochemicals found in whole seeds that can help defend against inflammation. Furthermore, refined oils may contain small amounts of trans fats linked to increased risks of heart disease and other serious medical conditions.
Avoiding toxic seed oils means choosing organic ones processed without chemicals such as hexane. Although this substance has been used since the 1930s to extract oils, its levels are limited under Australia and New Zealand’s Food Standards Code.
Make sure that you consume an appropriate balance of healthy fats to counterbalance the high amounts of seed oils found in your diet. Whole food sources should provide high quantities of Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids – ideal choices can include nuts.
Select whole food, non-processed oils as opposed to refined ones which are devoid of nutrients and may contain small amounts of saturated and trans fats. Be wary when purchasing seed oils from untrustworthy sources that undergo quality control tests prior to sale.

What's the Harm in Consuming Seed Oil?

What’s the Harm in Consuming Seed Oil?

Are Seed Oils Harming Your Health?

Social media posts or videos alleging seed oil to be harmful have become popular, often assailing it for headaches, foggy thinking, reduced immunity levels, heart disease and type 2 diabetes as a result of consumption.
These claims often rely on influencers’ opinions; however, science does not back them up. Instead, the Dietary Guidelines suggest taking in 2 tablespoons of oil daily.
But that doesn’t mean avoiding it altogether – in fact, seed oil is an excellent source of healthy fats that can aid digestion and provide energy boosts.
Essembe is packed with essential fatty acids such as Omega-3 and Omega-6 – these nutritious fats help regulate cholesterol levels, promote skin health and boost mental and physical energy.
Seed oils contain high concentrations of polyunsatured fatty acids (PUFAs). According to Dr. Cate Shanahan’s book “Avoiding the Hateful 8: The Truth About Seed Oils,” these unhealthy fats may contribute to inflammation and toxin buildup in your body, potentially leading to inflammation and an accumulation of toxins.
While seed oils should generally be limited, you can still use them in moderation when necessary for cooking purposes such as frying foods – though never at high temperatures in a restaurant deep fryer or at home deep fryers.
When using seed oils in your cooking, always choose organic versions certified by the USDA as this ensures they’re free from toxins. This is especially important when cooking processed food which could contain harmful toxins that transfer to their oils when heated.
Furthermore, avoid reusing cooking oil as this can bring more harm than good. Reheating oil repeatedly generates hydroxynonenal, an oxidative compound which has been linked to health issues like impaired energy metabolism and increased oxidative stress levels in humans.
As such, it’s best to focus on eating nutritious whole foods containing healthy fats than on consuming highly refined and processed seed oils. Whole plant-based foods contain plenty of essential vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that protect them from becoming rancid, making them far healthier alternatives than their seed oil counterparts.

Are Seed Oils Harming Your Health?

Are Seed Oils Harming Your Health?

Are Seed Oils Really that Harmful?

On Twitter and Instagram you may come across posts condemning seed oils (canola, corn, cottonseed, grapeseed, rice bran, sunflower, safflower and soy oils). They claim that seed oil products are toxic, leading to headaches as well as lower immunity levels and even heart disease.
Misinformation surrounding food and nutrition online abounds, with seed oils no exception. Social media nutritionists and blog writers can say anything they want about the foods we eat; consequently, some individuals blindly follow these statements without considering their source or considering any scientific basis behind their claims.
Many health experts mistakenly assume that seed oil contains saturated fats, which may increase your risk of heart disease and stroke if consumed in large amounts. But in actuality, certain kinds of unsaturated fatty acids like omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are essential for our overall wellbeing and can even help lower cholesterol levels within our bodies.
However, seed oils contain polyunsatured fats which can become rancid over time when exposed to oxygen and heat. Therefore it’s advisable to store your oils in a cool place, avoid deep frying frequently and include antioxidant-rich vegetables into your diet to protect them from becoming rancid.
Maintaining an optimal balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids is vital for optimal health, so it is crucial that we consume various sources of these essential lipids such as nuts and seeds, whole grains, avocados and fish.
These oils pose serious concerns due to their highly processed and heated production processes, which introduce potentially hazardous chemicals like trans fats. Furthermore, this process also introduces hexane as a chemical additive, which poses risks both to the environment and employees who breathe it in.
Trying to switch up your diet? Try swapping out butter and oils for something healthier like nut butter or coconut oil – these alternatives provide more nutritious fats like omega-3s than processed seed oils!

Are Seed Oils Really that Harmful?

Are Seed Oils Really that Harmful?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.