Unpacking the Truth: Seed Oils and Cancer Risk

By Tom Seest

Are Seed Oils Linked to Cancer Risk?

At SeedOilNews, we help people that are seed oil curious by collating information and news about seed oils.

Seed oils are industrial toxic oils made from seeds such as canola, corn, cottonseed, grapeseed, rice bran, sunflower and safflower that are widely consumed today as cooking and salad oils. Their consumption contributes to an imbalance of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid ratio in modern diets.
These foods contain inflammatory fats that are susceptible to oxidation during refining processes, frying operations or when exposed to oxygen and heat.

Are Seed Oils Linked to Cancer Risk?

Are Seed Oils Linked to Cancer Risk?

Are Omega-6 Fatty Acids Putting You at Risk?

Seed oils contain omega-6 fatty acids as well as essential omega-3 nutrients such as alpha-linoleic acid (ALA) and linolenic acid (LNA), providing multiple health benefits such as lower cholesterol, improved blood pressure, inflammation reduction and protection against cardiovascular disease.
Seed oils contain high concentrations of omega-6 fatty acids that have been linked with increased risks of cardiovascular and cancer diseases, along with corn, soybeans and safflower products.
Evidence indicates that high levels of omega-6s may increase the risk of various cancers, including stomach, breast, colon, prostate and pancreatic. This is most likely due to their ability to trigger our body’s production of pro-inflammatory chemicals.
Studies have demonstrated that eating moderate amounts of ALA and LNA may help combat inflammation and heart disease; however, evidence on this subject is scarce, leaving the connection between seed oil consumption and health outcomes unknown.
Many industrially produced oils come from corn, soy, rapeseed (canola), cottonseed and sunflower seed sources and used in products like margarine, chips, baked goods, mayonnaise, burger buns and more.
Historically, highly refined oils were promoted as healthier alternatives to saturated and trans fats; however, new research is revealing otherwise. It may be wiser to opt for more nutrient-dense foods like avocado, coconut oil and olive oil which are less prone to oxidation than seed oils.
These foods contain monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, which are healthier alternatives to omega-6 fatty acids. It’s important to keep in mind that monounsaturated and polyunsaturated oils have different cooking thresholds than saturated or trans fats, so they should be avoided if cooking at higher temperatures.
Consider switching from industrially produced seed oils and opt for more nutrient-dense sources of fatty acids like avocado, coconut oil and olive oil in your diet for balance and to reduce overconsumption of omega-6s.

Are Omega-6 Fatty Acids Putting You at Risk?

Are Omega-6 Fatty Acids Putting You at Risk?

Are Seed Oils Fueling Cancer Cells?

Seed oils may be great for cooking and frying, but they aren’t without their own set of problems. Rich in omega-6 fatty acids and lacking in the beneficial fats needed to combat inflammation in your body, seed oils should only be used sparingly.
These polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), otherwise known as omega-6 fats, may increase your risk of inflammation-related conditions like heart disease and cancer. To stay on the safe side it’s best to get omega-6s from healthy sources like nuts, seeds and fish while supplementing them with healthier omega-3 fatty acids for maximum effectiveness.
Though these concerns exist, linoleic and arachidonic acids found in seed oils have been linked with lower cardiovascular disease risks and inflammation levels, as well as improving brain function by helping maintain a healthy blood pressure and decreasing triglyceride levels.
Dietary health experts suggest eating an ideal ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fats ranging from 1:110 to 4:16, for optimal health. Unfortunately, however, too much omega-6 can be problematic; the typical American diet typically contains 20 times more omega-6 than omega-3 fatty acids – leading to inflammation and other diseases.
An imbalance can also cause you to gain weight and insulin resistance, increasing your risk for diabetes. To protect your health and avoid future ailments, eating a well-rounded diet that includes plenty of fresh vegetables, whole grains and healthy fats is key.
Seed oils can also be highly processed, loaded with additives and flavor enhancers, leading to buildups of harmful substances such as hydroxides and aldehydes that have been linked with inflammation and cancer.
Whenever using seed oils in your cooking, only select those of highest quality and purest varieties as these have undergone an intensive refining process which removes fatty acids and nutrients that could compromise its integrity.
These more costly oils may make a healthier seed oil an appealing replacement for conventional cooking oils – one you can use for frying foods, salad dressings or marinades without compromising taste. When shopping around, be sure to find a quality seed oil suitable for replacing conventional ones in your cooking needs.

Are Seed Oils Fueling Cancer Cells?

Are Seed Oils Fueling Cancer Cells?

Are You Putting Yourself at Risk with Seed Oils?

Seed oils have long been debated within the health and nutrition community. Some claim they can be toxic and damaging to human health; others counter with claims there is no hard evidence supporting such claims.
Seed oils are vegetable-derived oils extracted from seeds such as canola, cottonseed, corn, sunflower and safflower. These are widely used for cooking at both home and industrial food manufacturing settings.
These oils contain essential omega-3 and polyunsaturated fatty acids for human health. In addition, these antioxidant-rich oils may protect the body against disease or illness.
At its core, seed oils provide essential health benefits from good fats that reduce heart disease risk. When consumed in moderation, seed oils can lower LDL (bad) cholesterol while increasing HDL (good). A high LDL level can cause inflammation – one of the primary factors leading to cardiovascular issues and other health concerns.
These oils contain a blend of monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, and saturated fatty acids essential to human health, such as monounsaturates such as monounsaturate and polyunsatate as well as saturated fats such as polyunsats. Linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids – two heart-healthy fats often touted by health practitioners – also feature heavily in these oils.
These fats are polyunsatured, meaning that they can help lower LDL cholesterol levels – a primary contributor to heart disease. Eating seeds that contain an abundance of these essential fatty acids is especially helpful.
These options also contain lower levels of pro-inflammatory fats such as trans fats and lipid peroxides that have been linked with chronic diseases. Such fats are commonly found in processed and fast foods fried in oil; so it would be wise to switch out those items for healthier alternatives.
Some nutritionists advise limiting or excluding refined and heavily processed seed oils from your diet due to the potential health risks they present. Refining removes many beneficial plant chemicals and phytochemicals found in whole seeds; consequently they don’t offer as many nutritional benefits; unrefined oils offer greater nutrition benefits instead.

Are You Putting Yourself at Risk with Seed Oils?

Are You Putting Yourself at Risk with Seed Oils?

Could Seed Oils Actually Lower Cancer Risk?

Seed oils such as canola, sunflower, cottonseed and safflower oils are made from vegetable seeds and are frequently used as cooking oils in modern society. Furthermore, processed food containing seed oils contribute to rising rates of cancer and other illnesses that plague modern societies.
Seed oils often come under fire for their high concentration of omega-6 fatty acids, which have been shown to increase inflammation and increase your risk for diseases like cardiovascular issues and arthritis. They may even prompt your body to convert linoleic acid to arachidonic acid, leading to even further swelling.
Though excessive omega-6 fatty acid consumption may contribute to chronic inflammation, that doesn’t make omega-6s any less healthy for you. They actually help lower blood cholesterol and improve heart health when consumed as part of a nutritious diet; additionally they can reduce risks of asthma, arthritis and joint pain by helping improve immunity.
Seed oils may become rancid over time, which can be problematic as they contain polyunsaturates that easily go rancid when exposed to oxygen, heat or moisture from refining processes, cooking pans or bodies.
As such, it’s essential that people avoid eating fast-food, ultra-processed snacks that use seed oils as their main ingredient and contain plenty of calories, fat and sugar that contribute to obesity and poor health outcomes.
To combat these issues effectively, whole foods – ideally unrefined ones – should be prioritized as a source of essential nutrients such as fiber, vitamins and minerals not found in refined forms.
There are plenty of delicious whole foods that contain omega-3 fatty acids that are vital for brain and cardiovascular health, including nuts, salmon, tuna and walnuts – each boasting rich sources of these vital fatty acids.
Consume these types of fats in moderation; eating a diet rich in whole foods will ensure you’re receiving an appropriate balance between Omega-6 and Omega-3 fats, plus fresh fruits, vegetables, legumes and whole grains will give your body all of its essential nutrition.

Could Seed Oils Actually Lower Cancer Risk?

Could Seed Oils Actually Lower Cancer Risk?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.