Uncovering the Hidden Dangers Of Seed Oils

By Tom Seest

Are Seed Oils Making You Sick?

At SeedOilNews, we help people that are seed oil curious by collating information and news about seed oils.

Have you seen social media nutritionists warn about seed oils as potential detriments to health, such as their relationship to heart disease and leaky gut?
Guilt by association and misunderstand of science are among the primary contributors to misinformation surrounding certain substances, so let’s see what research says about them and if they really make us sick.

Are Seed Oils Making You Sick?

Are Seed Oils Making You Sick?

Do Omega-6 Fatty Acids Cause Harm?

Seed oils like safflower oil, grapeseed oil, sunflower oil and corn oil provide us with essential omega-6 polyunsaturated linoleic acid fatty acids that play an essential role in human health – but too much may lead to chronic inflammation and disease.
Consumers of too many omega-6 fatty acids risk upsetting our bodies’ delicate balance between these healthy fats and anti-inflammatory omega-3s – and this imbalance has been linked to health issues like heart disease, depression, high blood pressure and cancer.
Your body needs both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids from foods like wild-caught fatty fish, walnuts, flaxseeds and canola for proper function; unfortunately though, most people consume too much omega-6s while not enough omega-3s; this leads to inflammation that has been linked with many health problems.
To maintain a balance in our diets, it’s essential that we consume a variety of nutrient-dense foods containing both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids – such as fish, nuts and seeds, whole grains, fruits and vegetables.
These omega-6 fatty acids linoleic acid and arachidonic acid can be converted by our bodies into other pro-inflammatory compounds that could contribute to serious health conditions, including diabetes, cancer, depression and cardiovascular disease. Although no definitive proof is available that seed oils increase inflammation, some researchers believe excessive consumption may play a part in chronic diseases’ epidemic nature.
Note that seed oils are particularly susceptible to repeated heating, which depletes them of their natural antioxidants and leads to oxidative stress – which has been associated with heart disease and other chronic conditions.
To combat the negative impacts of fats, prioritize nutrient-dense foods while restricting processed food’s unhealthy fat intake. A small change can have incredible implications on both your overall health and skin!

Do Omega-6 Fatty Acids Cause Harm?

Do Omega-6 Fatty Acids Cause Harm?

Are Seed Oils Fuelling Chronic Disease?

Canola oil, soybean oil, sunflower oil, cottonseed oil and corn oil are excellent sources of omega-6 fatty acids in our diets. While omega-6s provide many health benefits to the brain and body alike, their overconsumption has also been linked to inflammation which in turn may contribute to chronic health conditions like heart disease or cancer.
Recent years have witnessed increased concern regarding the health benefits of are seed oils. Many believe they can increase inflammation and lead to chronic conditions like diabetes, depression and even cardiovascular disease.
Some health warnings stem from the belief that omega-6 fatty acids, particularly linoleic acid, can be converted to arachidonic acid in your body and lead to inflammation. But researchers have disproved this claim; when consumed alongside healthy monounsaturated and omega-3 fats like seed oils with ample amounts of healthy monounsaturates and omega-3s they will not contribute to inflammation.
Problematic seed oils are highly processed and often contain trans fats that can have serious implications on heart health. Their extraction involves heating them at high temperatures, which destroys essential unsaturated fatty acids while creating harmful byproducts such as hexane and synthetic antioxidants.
Therefore, it’s wiser to opt for healthier oils such as cold-pressed safflower and canola oils from local grocery stores or farm stands.
If you decide to consume are seed oils, opt for natural or organic varieties without extensive processing – for instance, raw olive oil, avocado oil and coconut oil could all be great replacement options!
One tablespoon of these oils provides about 120 calories and 14 grams of fat, but most also contain other ingredients such as soy lecithin, TBHQ, or even obscure additives such as dimethylpolysiloxane that make their nutritional value unknown.
Though seed oils can exacerbate inflammation, you’re more likely to benefit by cutting back on ultra-processed foods containing them and instead choosing whole food sources rich in omega-6s, which have been shown to promote heart health while decreasing your risk for obesity and disease.

Are Seed Oils Fuelling Chronic Disease?

Are Seed Oils Fuelling Chronic Disease?

What Makes Seed Oils Harmful?

Are seed oils are commonly found in many foods, ranging from processed snacks to fast food. They’re often added as thickening agents for meats, fried foods, and other dishes not cooked using water as a liquid source.
However, industrial seed oils present several serious downsides. First and foremost are their origins – genetically modified crops deplete our soil and farmland of nutrients while being highly inflammatory, potentially leading to chronic diseases like diabetes, cancer and autoimmune disorders.
As they disrupt the omega-6 to omega-3 ratio necessary for health, omega-6 fats have been linked with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes.
Furthermore, they interfere with our bodies’ natural fatty acid balance and cause inflammation to build up within. This can lead to weight gain, depression, irritability and fatigue – among other health issues.
Therefore, it is imperative that individuals consuming an obesity-focused diet incorporate whole and minimally processed foods into their daily eating plans. A plan with plenty of vegetables, fruit, whole grains, lean protein options, and seeds will help manage blood sugar levels effectively while curbing cravings for sugary treats and stabilizing sugar cravings.
There is an increasing social media movement which suggests seed oils are unhealthy. Most experts however, however, recommend eating them in moderation as part of an overall balanced diet.
Health experts overwhelmingly concur that modern diets contain too many omega-6 fats while lacking sufficient omega-3s, leading to systemic inflammation and an increased risk of disease.
To rectify this imbalance, a balanced diet must contain lots of vegetables and fruits, fiber-rich whole grains, legumes and lean proteins; additionally it should include healthy fats like extra virgin olive oil or avocado oil for additional support.
Cooking should use oils with low smoke points or heat sensitivity, such as canola and soybean oils, which degrade when heated and can form harmful byproducts that could potentially impact health. Instead, opt for olive or avocado oils when sauteing and for other needs in cooking.

What Makes Seed Oils Harmful?

What Makes Seed Oils Harmful?

Are Seed Oils Really as Healthy as They Seem?

Seed oils encompass an assortment of vegetable oils such as canola, soybean, corn, safflower, sunflower and peanut oils that come from single plants before being processed further in various ways that may render them less healthy than alternatives like olive or avocado oil.
Oils refined through refining processes often aren’t the most nutrient-dense choices; this process strips nutrients out and produces potentially toxic byproducts. Instead, opt for oils with reduced processing such as cold or expeller press processing methods.
Seed oils often receive an unfavorable reputation; however, they can actually play an essential role in providing a nutrient-rich diet. Their essential fatty acid constituents such as omega-6s and vitamin E provide essential protection for heart and brain from disease.
However, they do contribute to an imbalance of fats found in your diet that leads to systemic inflammation and increased risks of chronic diseases. This imbalance is often the result of modern-day diets high in omega-6s while low in healthy polyunsaturated fats like omega-3s.
One way to reduce the adverse effects of industrial seed oils is to replace them with healthier options like extra-virgin olive oil and avocado oil, both of which offer lower-priced versions than their more costly counterparts. If budgeting or dining out regularly are important factors in your life, unrefined versions may also prove more cost effective options than refined oils.
One way to maximize the potential of seed oil is to combine it with antioxidant-rich vegetables, as this will limit how quickly oxidation occurs and makes these polyunsaturated fats less likely to cause disease.
While some experts have advocated for removing seed oils entirely from our diets, the truth is that these healthy fats only become harmful when eaten in large amounts. Small quantities are perfectly acceptable as part of a well-rounded diet which includes other nourishing foods.
Repeatedly heating seed oils to high temperatures, such as found in restaurant deep-fryers, can result in harmful compounds forming when reused, making it prudent not to use these oils at home for frying. It is wiser not to reuse such oils for home frying purposes.

Are Seed Oils Really as Healthy as They Seem?

Are Seed Oils Really as Healthy as They Seem?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.