Uncovering the Health Risks Of Seed Oils

By Tom Seest

Are Seed Oils Making You Unwell?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oil by collating information and news about seed oils.

We are all familiar with the widespread belief that seed oils are bad for us – this myth remains one of the most pervasive health myths.
No scientific foundation exists for such claims.
Instead, the most effective strategy for improving health and lowering inflammation levels is to limit ultra-processed foods while increasing the consumption of nutritious fats from natural sources like fish, nuts, seeds, and avocados.

Are Seed Oils Making You Unwell?

Are Seed Oils Making You Unwell?

Can Seed Oils Cause Inflammation?

Inflammation is your body’s natural defense mechanism against harmful stimuli like pathogens and irritants, serving an important part in maintaining homeostasis (maintaining equilibrium within). Inflammation plays an integral part in immune defense as it acts to grow new cells, heal wounds, maintain homeostasis (the balance within), and promote cell division and division.
As with inflammation, inflammation symptoms may include pain of various types and intensities. Fever is often present, while other physical manifestations include fatigue, muscle aches, and headaches.
Chronic inflammation can make you sick, increasing the risk for several illnesses like heart disease, diabetes and cancer. Medication, supplements and following a low-inflammation diet can all help to decrease inflammation.
An effective strategy for combatting inflammation is reducing your intake of processed food while increasing intake of whole, nutrient-rich foods like fruit and vegetables, lean meats, nuts seeds beans and fish.
Seed oils are highly processed, containing large quantities of omega-6 fatty acids that have pro-inflammatory effects and may create an imbalance between omega-6 to omega-3 ratios, which are necessary for maintaining good health.
Seed oils may have an adverse impact on the gut bacteria balance, leading to other health complications if too many are consumed and too few whole, unprocessed foods.
Inflammation can be caused by many different factors, including immune cells and biochemical reactions. When acute inflammation strikes, the body responds by attacking foreign invaders or damaged tissue – often as the result of an injury, an autoimmune condition, or another disease.
Acute inflammation typically lasts a few days and can be extremely painful, as its cause lies in the release of pro-inflammatory chemicals that target your cells, blood vessels and tissues. It may cause swelling and damage as well as developing into silent inflammation without noticeable symptoms.
There is some evidence to support that seed oils may convert beneficial unsaturated fats to potentially pro-inflammatory trans fats when heated at high temperatures for prolonged periods, which should not be an issue for most individuals who cook at lower to medium heat in their kitchens but could become an issue in commercial kitchens or food production environments where seed oils are exposed to higher temperatures for extended periods.

Can Seed Oils Cause Inflammation?

Can Seed Oils Cause Inflammation?

Can Seed Oils Increase Your Risk of Heart Disease?

Heart disease is the number one cause of death in America, affecting people of all ages and ethnic groups. Not only is smoking responsible, but diet, obesity, high cholesterol levels and lack of physical exercise also play a significant role.
Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), the most prevalent form of heart disease, slows down blood flow through arteries that supply your heart with oxygen and nutrients, leading to chest pain or heart attacks in extreme cases. A narrowed or blocked artery may even result in its closure, leading to chest pain or heart attacks; additional symptoms of coronary Artery Disease (CAD) include angina (when your muscles that pump the blood become tight or squeezed tight) or arrhythmia causing irregular or skipped beats of your heartbeats).
Preventing coronary artery disease (CAD) involves eating a diet high in essential vitamins and nutrients while exercising regularly, as well as avoiding risk factors like smoking, being overweight, high blood pressure, diabetes, or having a family history of it.
Your doctor can use several noninvasive tests to help assess if you have heart disease. An electrocardiogram (EKG), which measures electrical activity of your heart, and blood tests to measure cholesterol and assess inflammation are both useful in making this determination.
Some doctors may also suggest scheduling a physical examination in order to detect symptoms. Your physician will take note of your medical history, ask about how you’re feeling and conduct a series of physical tests on both the heart and blood vessels.
Your doctor can also conduct a heart ultrasound, which will show whether you have plaque in your arteries or other forms of heart damage, and perform a stress test using a device to measure how strain on your heart increases during exercise.
Myocardial infarction, more commonly known as heart attack, occurs when a blood clot or plaque blocks an artery supplying oxygen and blood to your heart. Symptoms include shortness of breath, chest pain, and extreme fatigue.
Other types of heart diseases, including congenital heart disease, heart rhythm disorders, and endocarditis, are likely to arise shortly or years after birth.

Can Seed Oils Increase Your Risk of Heart Disease?

Can Seed Oils Increase Your Risk of Heart Disease?

Does Eating Seed Oils Cause Weight Gain?

Nutrition experts generally suggest including small amounts of seed oils into your diet; however, this does not have to mean cutting them completely out.
Seed oils contain essential monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids for optimal health, making them essential components of diets. Experts, however, often advise taking in your fat intake via whole food sources like nuts and seeds instead of processed ones.
Seed oil critics frequently highlight its high levels of omega-6 fatty acids, which cause inflammation and increase one’s risk for chronic disease. While some omega-6s can be beneficial, too much consumption could increase one’s risks of heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.
An additional criticism of these oils’ production lies in their use of high levels of heat and solvents such as hexane. Hexane may cause respiratory issues in workers exposed to it and could pose potential health hazards to workers exposed to it directly.
Researchers have also demonstrated that polyunsaturates found in seed oils can become oxidized when exposed to heat, producing toxic substances like lipid peroxides and trans fats – substances associated with obesity, heart disease, and DNA damage.
Coconut oil offers one of the healthiest cooking oils on the market. Comprised of 90% saturated fat, lauric acid can help regulate blood sugar and lower cardiovascular disease risk factors.
Avocado, olive, and hemp oils all provide various fatty acids, including omega-3 and omega-6, to support optimal health in cooking.
Though there has been considerable debate regarding the benefits of polyunsaturated fats, most health experts agree they are beneficial for your heart and brain health. But ultimately, your overall diet plays the most significant role in your wellbeing.
So it’s essential to avoid ultra-processed foods containing industrial seed oils like canola, corn, cottonseed, soybean, sunflower, safflower, and peanut oils in excess. As with homemade food preparation, only use these harmful oils when necessary; when dining out, look out for restaurants that do not utilize these harmful oils.

Does Eating Seed Oils Cause Weight Gain?

Does Eating Seed Oils Cause Weight Gain?

Can Seed Oils Lead to Cancer?

If you follow social media nutritionists or diet book authors, chances are you’ve seen posts suggesting seed oils are unhealthy for consumption. They contain omega-6 fatty acids, which experts claim can contribute to inflammation.
There is limited evidence supporting this claim, however research has demonstrated that linoleic acid can actually enhance cardiovascular health and lower cholesterol levels while contributing to healthy skin, hair and nails.
Importantly, claims against seed oils based on animal research do not directly translate to people. Humans do not react similarly to rodents when exposed to linoleic acid so its impact on inflammation in people is unclear.
Many experts contend that seed oils don’t pose any sort of inflammatory threat, rather they tend to upset our diet’s delicate balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fats, with too many omega-6 fatty acids coming from seed oils being consumed too regularly.
For optimal omega-3 to omega-6 ratios, the American Dietary Guidelines suggest we get most of our fat from plant sources like fish, nuts, seeds, and oils like extra-virgin olive oil while limiting saturated and trans fat intake. Thus, we may safely include small amounts of seed oil (up to 2 tablespoons per 2000 calories) without risking our health.
Seed oil’s high smoke point makes it perfect for high-heat methods of cooking, such as frying and roasting.
Studies are growing increasingly evident on how industrial seed oils may be harmful to your health, yet there are ways you can limit exposure. You can cut back on ultra-processed foods containing these seed oils, as well as use healthier oils when cooking or creating sauces and dressings.
Avoid industrially produced seed oils by opting for organic and minimally processed products like seeds, legumes, and nuts.

Can Seed Oils Lead to Cancer?

Can Seed Oils Lead to Cancer?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.