Unveiling the Truth About Seed Oils

By Tom Seest

Are Seed Oils Really As Terrible As Reddit Claims?

At SeedOilNews, we help people that are seed oil curious by collating information and news about seed oils.

Seed oils can often be found as ingredients in ultra-processed food products like granola bars, protein bars, fried foods, and breads containing excess amounts of sugar, salt and preservatives.
Seed oils have long been associated with guilt by association and ignorance regarding their science-backed benefits, but we’re here to set the record straight and demonstrate why they’re actually healthy oils with proven advantages.

Are Seed Oils Really As Terrible As Reddit Claims?

Are Seed Oils Really As Terrible As Reddit Claims?

Why are Omega-6 Fatty Acids Controversial?

Answer to Is Seed Oil Bad There is an answer, though its details can be complicated: yes and no. Ultimately, however, what it boils down to is this: seed oils contain predominantly omega-6 fatty acids which may not be helpful.
Omega-6 fatty acids have long been recognized for triggering inflammation, which in turn contributes to chronic illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer. Their primary source is industrial seed oils used in processed food products that we consume every day.
These seed oils are typically made from soybeans, corn, safflower cottonseed canola sunflower and other plant-based seeds and nuts. Used for cooking methods that require high heat temperatures with higher smoke points than traditional oils; plus they store for an extended period without spoilage – perfect ingredients for ultra processed foods such as crackers and cakes!
Many critics assert that omega-6 fatty acids are pro-inflammatory; however, this is simply untrue; in moderation omega-6s can actually be very beneficial for our health.
While there may be concerns regarding industrial seed oils, other healthy fat sources like olive oil, coconut oil, wild seafood and nuts and seeds tend to contain lower concentrations of omega-6 fatty acids than their industrial counterparts. Furthermore, omega-3s from fish consumption can help combat inflammation.
Maintain a proper ratio between omega-6 fatty acids and omega-3 fatty acids to optimize health and longevity, according to the American Heart Association. A diet with an omega-6 to omega-3 ratio of 15-1 should be optimal.
Omega-3 fats provide another benefit of eating omega-3s: anti-inflammation. Eating enough polyunsatured fatty acids from your diet or supplements will lower the risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes. The key is getting enough omega-3 polyunsatured fatty acids into your system through regular consumption of these food items or supplements.
Diets rich in essential fatty acids such as omega-3s and omega-6s may also benefit from taking multivitamin supplements containing both types of essential fatty acids, including olive oil as a replacement for butter in cooking and more omega-3-rich fish in diet. It’s best to consume an array of both essential fatty acids.

Why are Omega-6 Fatty Acids Controversial?

Why are Omega-6 Fatty Acids Controversial?

What’s the Real Risk of Inflammation?

Seed oils such as soybean oil and sunflower oil make up an abundant portion of most American diets, although their high omega-6 fatty acid content has often been blamed for leading to chronic inflammation within the body.
But if you eat a balanced, whole foods diet, seed oils may not necessarily be harmful. They may actually provide additional Omega 3s if your other sources don’t meet your needs – like fish, nuts or olive or avocado oil.
Inflammation occurs when your body can’t regulate the expression of proinflammatory genes. Saturated fat, like that found in coconut oil or butter, triggers this response in cells. This may explain why some studies link diet-rich in saturated fat with inflammation while others do not.
Saturated fats increase your risk for heart disease and diabetes, as do oxidized (rancid) fats. These fatty acids form when oils are refined before being used for frying; however, they’re not the sole culprits behind inflammation conditions.
Polyunsaturated fatty acids, like any fat, can become rancid over time. This could happen during refining, on shelves or frying pans; and the more oxidized, the worse for your health they are.
Linoleic acid can easily be converted to arachidonic acid, an extremely pro-inflammatory chemical found in foods like meat and eggs. This poses a danger for those already struggling with inflammation as well as increasing their risk for chronic diseases like heart disease and cancer.
Therefore, it’s essential that we consume a diet rich in both omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in order to ensure proper balance in our bodies and reduce risks for inflammation while improving overall health. By eating in this way, it may reduce inflammation risk while improving health overall.
Avoiding foods known to trigger inflammation is the key to long-term health. That includes cutting back on sugar consumption and processed food consumption in general; and working with your precision medicine doctor on creating a plan to eliminate foods known to be triggers of inflammation.

What's the Real Risk of Inflammation?

What’s the Real Risk of Inflammation?

Are seed oils really as harmful as they seem?

Social media users often criticize seed oils, often making negative claims against them that are often taken to extreme. Haters claim that seed oils cause inflammation and have links with many health conditions including heart disease, weight gain and diabetes.
These concerns have existed for years, yet have recently gained more traction due to factors like paleo eating and clean eating gaining more momentum and misinformation regarding seed oil’s health benefits.
Critics contend that seed oils impair our omega-6 to omega-3 ratio, essential for good health. According to them, this imbalance can lead to chronic inflammation which in turn contributes to conditions like heart disease and cancer.
Researchers have since proven this theory false. Indeed, one omega-6 fatty acid found in seed oils called linoleic acid may actually help lower inflammation in humans.
If you enjoy using seed oils in your cooking, aim to limit their consumption. Dr. Mozaffarian recommends purchasing unsulfured varieties as these tend to contain more nutrients and have greater nutritional density than their processed counterparts.
Linoleic acid is an excellent source of vitamin E, essential for protecting against cardiovascular disease and strengthening immunity. You can find it in oils such as corn, sunflower and cottonseed.
As part of a healthy diet, nuts and seeds provide essential fatty acids in natural forms which are balanced with fiber, vitamins, and minerals that prevent rancidity of fats.
Tallow, lard, chicken and goose fat and duck fat are other sources of fatty acids that provide similar nutritional profiles as seed oils – providing another option when cooking without increasing heart disease risk.
Seed oils don’t have the harmful consequences many critics suggest they do; in fact, they should be part of a nutritious diet consisting of whole foods and consumed sparingly.

Are seed oils really as harmful as they seem?

Are seed oils really as harmful as they seem?

Are Seed Oils Harming Your Health?

On Twitter, Instagram, and Tik Tok we have seen numerous posts and memes regarding seed oils: Canola (rapeseed), corn, cottonseed, grapeseed, rice bran, safflower and sunflower oils are often touted as toxic and can cause headaches, foggy thinking, lower immunity levels, heart disease, type 2 diabetes as well as headaches. Advocates of #seedoilfree say staying away from these vegetable oils will protect from disease while aiding weight loss while increasing energy.
Some nutritionists have claimed that seed oils are harmful because they contain high concentrations of omega-6 fatty acids that contribute to inflammation in the body. Linoleic acid, one of the primary omega-6s found in these oils, can be converted by your body into arachidonic acid, known to increase inflammation.
However, this inflammatory claim is mostly based on lab animals and may not necessarily apply to humans. Furthermore, only a small fraction of linoleic acid converts into arachidonic acid in our bodies.
Additionally, most people do not meet their Recommended Daily Allowance of vitamin E; seed oils provide an ideal source if your diet lacks fats. But if you opt to use seed oils, be aware that they contain polyunsatured fats which may go rancid quickly when exposed to oxygen or heat exposure in your pantry.
Finaly, one major source of contention regarding these oils lies with industrial processing. Refining can strip these oils of phytochemicals that have antioxidative or other desirable properties and these processed oils may contain trace amounts of trans fats – both factors which play into controversy over them.
These toxins can be detrimental to our health, yet scientific investigation has not demonstrated that refined seed oils pose any threat.
At its core, these claims arise from a misunderstanding about how nutrients interact with biological processes and our overall health. While it’s impossible to completely avoid such statements from nutritionists or anyone else, no single food should ever be seen as the answer for our health woes.

Are Seed Oils Harming Your Health?

Are Seed Oils Harming Your Health?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.