The Surprising Truth About Seed Oils

By Tom Seest

Are Seed Oils Really That Bad for You?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oil by collating information and news about seed oils.

If you spend much of your time keeping up with health and wellness trends, chances are good that you have heard that seed oils can be harmful. A quick search on TikTok will reveal countless videos warning against processed oils like these.
Experts differ on this point; while some claim that high PUFA seed oils erode immunity, others consider these oils part of a healthy diet.

Are Seed Oils Really That Bad for You?

Are Seed Oils Really That Bad for You?

Is Omega-6 Fatty Acid Consumption Dangerous?

Seed oils have long been a point of contention among experts, with some declaring them unhealthy while others suggest they’re not as bad as perceived. One reason may be their high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). While not generally unhealthy, too many omega-6 PUFAs could put your body at risk of inflammation – but this risk can be avoided by choosing food high in omega-3, such as salmon, tuna, and walnuts.
Seed oils contain too many omega-6 fatty acids, known as pro-inflammatory fats, leading to an imbalance between omega-6 and omega-3 intake and raising your risk for chronic diseases and other health concerns. Consuming too many of them could result in an imbalance between those two categories of essential fatty acids – meaning too much consumption could put your health at risk!
Omega-6 fatty acids may be inflammatory, but omega-3s have proven themselves as anti-inflammatory agents that protect against heart disease, obesity and depression – and other related conditions.
Many people mistakenly believe that seed oils are unhealthy because they contain omega-6 fatty acids, but this misconception must be dispelled: omega-6s do not pose any significant harm in small quantities – in fact, some studies have even proven that increasing omega-6 intake could actually benefit health in ways you’d never expect!
Diet is the key to avoiding seed oils; aim for a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean protein options, and fatty fish. Olive oil is one such cooking oil that’s lower in omega-6s; for those who insist on using one anyway, opt for organic or minimally processed varieties as these will help prevent trans-fats from forming in it.

Is Omega-6 Fatty Acid Consumption Dangerous?

Is Omega-6 Fatty Acid Consumption Dangerous?

The Toxic Reality of Seed Oils?

While it is essential to consume a balanced diet that includes fats, some oils should be avoided. Seed oils commonly found in processed food contain too many omega-6 fatty acids that contribute to inflammation and obesity, while many of them undergo industrial processing that leaves potentially toxic residues that enter our bodies through inhalation and cause health complications.
These unhealthy oils are used in everything from salad dressings and french fries, as well as being frequently found in restaurants. They’re often made of processed vegetable oils refined and mixed with additives; once heated at high temperatures to ensure it remains liquid they produce toxic compounds which have the potential of leading to cardiovascular disease, cancer or other illnesses.
Health experts often warn people against toxic oils, but does this hold water? Such oils are highly processed and packed with omega-6 fatty acids, which are known to weaken immunity and damage immune systems. Furthermore, these oils can easily oxidize over time, making them harmful to our bodies.
Seed oils are an edible group of plant oils found in canola, cottonseed, soybeans, corn, sunflower, safflower, and grapeseed oils. While these industrial oils can be quickly oxidized by heat, light, or air exposure, their lack of nutritional benefits as compared to avocados, olives, and coconuts makes them especially prone to being compromised over time by our bodies absorbing these compounds; in addition, they undergo harsh processing using hazardous chemicals such as the organic solvent hexane which has been implicated as being harmful in human consumption;
Prior to 2020, most nutrition experts considered these oils neutral or healthy. But Cate Shanahan coined them “The Hateful Eight,” warning her audience not to consume them because omega-6 fatty acids found in these oils promote inflammation, which results in the accumulation of toxins within body fat cells.
Though industrial seed oils should be avoided, whole food sources that contain them need not be eliminated from our diets entirely. What really needs to be addressed here is an imbalance between omega-3 fatty acids and omega-6 fatty acids found in modern diets due to excessive consumption of processed food products while simultaneously eating few nutritious whole-food sources.

The Toxic Reality of Seed Oils?

The Toxic Reality of Seed Oils?

Are Seed Oils Inflammatory?

Seed oils have long been a contentious issue in health and fitness circles. While some experts contend they cause inflammation and contribute to chronic conditions, others disagree and view them as neutral or healthy. Prior to recent research findings, most experts viewed seed oils as neutral or even beneficial; however, due to widespread use in fast food restaurants and packaged goods, they can be difficult to avoid; however, there are ways you can cut these processed oils out of your diet.
Recently, many experts considered omega-6 polyunsaturated fats present in seed oils to be neutral or even beneficial to health. However, in 2020, Dr. Cate Shanahan, an influential nutritionist known for identifying toxic food substances as sources of inflammation and accumulation in body fat deposits. She specifically identified eight seed oils she called “The Hateful Eight,” suggesting they be avoided at all costs by her audience. Shanahan believes these high PUFA seed oils promote inflammation while leading to toxic accumulation within our fat cells.
Some may argue that linoleic acid, an omega-6 fat found in seed oils, can be pro-inflammatory due to its conversion into arachidonic acid in the body. Although this may be true for some extent, only a very small portion of linoleic acid actually ends up as arachidonic acid; most often cells use it for energy use instead.
Although seed oils have been heavily refined, they still tend to be relatively healthy compared with animal fats and industrial oils. To maximize health benefits when using these types of oils in food such as salad dressing or cooking at home, make sure that they’re consumed only occasionally and limit how often they’re added in processed or fast foods.
Seed oils can be found in many packaged and processed foods, from baked goods and protein bars to salad dressings and deep fryers. While these oils may contain potentially hazardous components such as hexane, phthalates and synthetic antioxidants that pose risks when used for deep frying, this usually only poses an issue at restaurants using industrial deep fryers – most supermarket oils undergo stringent quality control checks which include testing for hexane levels before being released for human consumption in the US or UK markets.

Are Seed Oils Inflammatory?

Are Seed Oils Inflammatory?

Can Seed Oils Really Be Worth Your Money?

There has been considerable buzz surrounding seed oils. They can be found in packaged foods, such as french fries, fried chicken and cookies; restaurants use them commercially deep fryers; some people even blame seed oils for obesity and cardiovascular disease. Critics allege they contain toxic byproducts created from heating the oils at high temperatures with solvents like hexane to extract them; these toxic byproducts may even contribute to obesity and cardiovascular issues.
Concerns surrounding many seed oils come from their high concentration of omega-6 polyunsaturated fats, which our bodies convert to arachidonic acid for chronic inflammation in our bodies – leading to problems like heart disease, depression and cancer. Due to this factor, many have chosen cooking oils with lower omega-6 content such as olive oil, flaxseed oil or fish oil when selecting their cooking oils for cooking purposes.
However, the evidence supporting these claims is relatively weak due to most research on omega-6 polyunsaturated fats being conducted with animals that don’t reflect human behavior. Furthermore, omega-6 fats are essential components of our diets – helping reduce inflammation and strengthen our immune systems.
Another widespread criticism of seed oils is their supposed high level of trans fats. While some oils do involve heating at extremely high temperatures and using solvents like hexane during production, most don’t get to this temperature and undergo stringent quality control checks, making it unlikely any harmful byproducts exist in them.
Studies have also demonstrated that seed oils are not inflammatory; in fact, some studies even demonstrate they reduce heart disease risk. To limit exposure to these oils and ensure maximum omega-3 intake while simultaneously decreasing omega-6 fat consumption.

Can Seed Oils Really Be Worth Your Money?

Can Seed Oils Really Be Worth Your Money?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.