Unmasking the Hidden Culprit Of Acne

By Tom Seest

Are Seed Oils to Blame for Acne?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oil by collating information and news about seed oils.

Seed oils have been met with much debate. Some claim they’re inflaming to the gut, while others assert they contain toxic materials like hexane.
No matter your opinion, seed oils contain omega-6 fatty acids, which your body requires in a balanced ratio for proper functioning.

Are Seed Oils to Blame for Acne?

Are Seed Oils to Blame for Acne?

What Can Omega-6 Fatty Acids Do to Your Skin?

Foods rich in omega-6 fatty acids may cause your body to convert the linoleic acid present into longer chains of omega-6 fatty acids (AA). These longer AA chains may then produce pro-inflammatory eicosanoids, hence why it’s so essential that you maintain an appropriate ratio between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in your diet.
Modern American diets contain large quantities of omega-6 fatty acids from processed food and seed oils, which have been linked with chronic inflammation. Chronic inflammation may aggravate skin disorders like acne and psoriasis [*].
For healthier skin, it is wise to limit your consumption of seed oil-rich foods as much as possible – this includes fast food, processed meals, and packaged goods.
Another source of omega-6 fatty acids that cause inflammation in your body is processed foods with refined carbohydrates, which can disrupt gut bacteria and trigger an immune response in response to inflammation in other parts of your body. Therefore, it’s crucial that you consume plenty of fiber-rich foods throughout the day.
Essential fatty acids, including omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, are necessary for skin health. Fatty acids help retain moisture in your skin cells to keep it supple and flexible while protecting it against UV rays, pollution, and environmental damage.
Essential fatty acids play a pivotal role in cell growth, tissue repair and wound healing processes as well as fighting inflammation caused by free radicals that contribute to many skin ailments.
As can be seen, eating a diet rich in fish, nuts, seeds, and whole grains offers many health advantages. Furthermore, it’s wise to limit the consumption of unhealthy vegetable oils and junk food in general.
For optimal skin health and vitality, supplementation is key to finding the ideal balance of essential fatty acids. DMK’s Ultra EFA contains both types and other beneficial nutrients that contribute to healthier and more vibrant skin.
An ideal omega-3 to omega-6 ratio should be 2:1:1, but your daily consumption can differ depending on personal preferences and lifestyle considerations. For best results, consult with a qualified health practitioner about which dietary choices will best meet your specific requirements.

What Can Omega-6 Fatty Acids Do to Your Skin?

What Can Omega-6 Fatty Acids Do to Your Skin?

Is Your Diet Making You Breakout?

Omega-3 fatty acids (also referred to as polyunsaturated fatty acids or omegas) are essential dietary components provided by both ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) and DHA (docosapentaenoic acid). You can get omegas from various foods – fish being an especially good source.
Alpha-linolenic acid is an omega-3 fatty acid your body cannot produce on its own and can be found in plant sources such as flaxseed, chia seed, walnuts and canola oil. Your body converts this fatty acid to DHA for inflammation reduction – DHA itself being considered an essential fatty acid as your body cannot produce it on its own.
However, eating too many seed oils high in omega-6 linoleic acid could contribute to acne and other skin conditions. Such seed oils are often found in packaged and fast food.
Linoleic acid, also referred to as 18:2 or omega-6) due to containing two consecutive double bonds at carbon number 6 when counting from its methyl end, is an essential nutrient; however, too much consumption may be harmful.
Limiting linoleic acid consumption is especially essential to combating acne-like inflammatory conditions. Achieve a balance of omega-6 to omega-3 fats in your diet will be key in helping alleviate this type of inflammation.
Inflammation is the body’s response to blocked pores, excess oil production, and bacterial overgrowth and may occur both acutely and chronically.
If you suffer from an autoimmune condition, increasing your omega-3 intake by eating more fish could provide significant relief. As Dr. Miller suggests, increasing EPA and DHA intake can reduce inflammation.
Assuring your intake is balanced is best achieved through eating food low in omega-6 linoleic acids such as fried foods and packaged goods containing seed oils; alternatively you could take an omega-3 fatty acid supplement such as fish oil or krill oil to increase its consumption.

Is Your Diet Making You Breakout?

Is Your Diet Making You Breakout?

What Role Do Antioxidants Play?

Antioxidants are naturally-occurring vitamins and minerals that protect cells against free radical damage, making them essential for maintaining healthy skin. Integrate antioxidants into your beauty regimen for the best results.
Lack of antioxidants in your diet, exercise regimen or supplement regimen is linked with heart disease and cancer; so it’s vital that you make sure you’re getting enough antioxidants through diet, exercise or supplements. A combination of diet, exercise and taking additional antioxidants supplements are all ways of increasing antioxidant consumption in your daily regimen.
Seed oils such as rapeseed, sesame and sunflower are susceptible to oxidation due to their high concentrations of unsaturated fatty acids and free fatty acids, potentially leading to rancidity, foul smells and discoloration of oils. Lipid oxidation may even lead to rancidity.
Oxidation increases your risk of bacterial infection and leads to skin inflammation and blemishes. To combat this issue, vitamin C, E, beta-carotene, and flavonoids should be part of your skincare regime.
Antioxidants may not be a cure for acne, but they may reduce its severity by blocking free radical production. Antioxidants can be found in various food items including vegetables, fruits, nuts and seeds.
Studies have indicated that lipid peroxidation, a byproduct of oxidative stress, may play a part in the pathogenesis of acne. According to these studies, antioxidants that decrease oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation could potentially prevent and treat acne.
Keep in mind that antioxidants may interact with any medications your physician has prescribed; be wary of how much antioxidants you take.
Antioxidants found in skin care products typically come from fruit and vegetable extracts, such as polyphenols and flavonoids found in green tea – these natural antioxidants help prevent wrinkles while leaving your skin soft and smooth.
Lutein and zeaxanthin are also potent antioxidants that are known to shield skin from UV radiation while helping fight aging by neutralizing free radicals.
Antioxidants are an integral component of many products designed to target blemishes. They prevent oil oxidation that worsens breakouts, leading to more severe spots and breakouts, while acting as antibacterial agents by decreasing bacteria count on skin surfaces.

What Role Do Antioxidants Play?

What Role Do Antioxidants Play?

Are You Taking the Right Vitamins?

Some vitamins, such as Vitamin D and B6, may cause acne breakouts when taken in excess. You should take them in moderation; if you’re experiencing breakouts, temporarily eliminate them from your diet to see how that impacts your skin.
Biotin, another common multivitamin ingredient, may also contribute to acne breakouts if consumed excessively. Since it’s found in hair products and multivitamins alike, consuming too much biotin could lead to too many breakouts if careless usage is ignored.
The problem is that too much vitamin A can compete with vitamin B12’s anti-inflammatory and oil production-reducing benefits – leading to inflammation that could eventually result in acne breakouts in certain cases, according to dermatologist Dr Gurveen Waraich.
As with many supplements, overusing vitamin A could make your skin more susceptible to sun exposure and cause further breakouts and scarring. Luckily, other alternatives exist for providing your daily dose without risking breakouts; such as folic acid and creatine which reduce inflammation while improving firmness of the skin in real time.
Seed oils are often refined and contain high concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Since PUFA is susceptible to oxidation in both your pantry and body, it’s best to store seed oils in cool locations or avoid deep frying with them.
If you want to add seed oils into your diet, choose ones that have not been refined and cold-pressed – these tend to be more costly but offer greater nutritional benefits, due to preserving more essential vitamins and minerals in their composition.
Canola seed oil is one of the most popular options available and contains a high concentration of omega-6 fatty acids that contribute to overall wellness; while canola oil should play an essential role in any healthy diet, too much omega-6 can increase heart disease risk as well as some other conditions like cancer and Alzheimer’s.
For optimal cooking results, it is wise to select an oil that uses cold-press techniques for cold pressing. Although more expensive than other seed oils, cold-pressed olive oil offers significant omega-3 benefits that make up for its cost difference.

Are You Taking the Right Vitamins?

Are You Taking the Right Vitamins?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.