The Truth About Harmful Seed Oils

By Tom Seest

Are Some Seed Oils Bad for You?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oil by collating information and news about seed oils.

Search social media, and you will likely come across numerous posts and memes alleging that seed oils such as canola (rapeseed), corn, cottonseed, grapeseed, sunflower, rice bran, and safflower are toxic and cause headaches, fogginess, reduced immunity, heart disease, and weight gain. But is this really the case?
These foods contain omega-6 fats that have pro-inflammatory effects. But they also provide your body with essential omega-3s at just the right levels.

Are Some Seed Oils Bad for You?

Are Some Seed Oils Bad for You?

Are You Making Your Inflammation Worse?

Seed oils have earned themselves a bad rap due to their abundance of omega-6 fatty acids. Critics claim that too much of this type of fat increases inflammation levels, contributing to everything from heart disease and depression to obesity and cancer. While omega-3s can act as anti-inflammatories, most omega-6 found in seed oils is converted into arachidonic acid, which produces pro-inflammatory compounds.
Refining seed and vegetable oils, commonly found in cans, has also been accused of damaging their health-promoting properties by adding toxic byproducts such as hexane. Extracting seeds for oil uses chemicals that create chemical additives and unstable oxidized fats that could potentially pose health issues, but this shouldn’t pose too much of a problem in home kitchen environments where most oils are heated for short durations only.
Another issue pertaining to seed oils and omega-6 linoleic acid is its reputation as an inflammatory fat in the body, according to critics. They argue that too much linoleic acid leads to chronic inflammation that leads to heart disease and other illnesses; they point out studies wherein mice or rats experienced higher inflammation due to this supplement, although these animal experiments might not always reflect what occurs with humans.
At times, critics of seed oils suggest they become rancid quickly due to their polyunsaturates. Polyunsaturated fats are particularly susceptible to oxidation during refining processes, on shelves, frying pans, or in your body; pro-inflammatory fats don’t protect against heart disease in large doses, though; instead, they increase inflammation levels. Oxidized oils may not protect from this form of oxidization either unless heated repeatedly at high temperatures, as in commercial kitchens;

Are You Making Your Inflammation Worse?

Are You Making Your Inflammation Worse?

Are You Consuming Harmful Toxins from Seed Oils?

Industrial seed oils such as canola, corn, cottonseed, safflower, soybean and sunflower often garner negative press. Their composition often contains high amounts of linoleic acid – an n-6 polyunsaturated fat which has been shown to raise your risk for inflammation, heart disease and obesity. But there are healthier fats such as those found in tallow and butter which have much lower rates of inflammation.
One of the primary concerns with industrial seed oils is their rapid oxidation rate and subsequent rancidity, due to free radical production from omega-6 fatty acids oxidizing into free radicals that cause health issues including aging, cancer, autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular disease, asthma, diabetes and even depression.
Seed oils present several challenges due to their processing method, often using petroleum-based chemicals like hexane for refinement and bleaching, which adds chemical additives while producing unstable oxidation products that are harmful both to humans and the environment.
Seed oils contain chemicals like TBHQ, BHA, and BHT to extend shelf life and avoid oxidation, but these same toxic oils can contribute to cancer, obesity, and dementia in humans. Furthermore, many processed food items made with seed oils–particularly those prepared in multiple batches–are then cooked multiple times using these same toxic oils before reaching our plates.
Are seed oils as unhealthy as some nutrition influencers on social media suggest? The answer depends on your definition of “unhealthy.” Incorporating whole, unprocessed fats like those found in seeds, nuts, and avocado into meals is much healthier than using industrial seed oils in packaged food products because they come packed with fiber, vitamins and minerals, antioxidants that protect them against oxidation, omega-3 fatty acids essential for brain health, strong immunity systems and overall improved metabolism – simply choose whole food-based fats to boost metabolism while giving a long-term energy boost.

Are You Consuming Harmful Toxins from Seed Oils?

Are You Consuming Harmful Toxins from Seed Oils?

What Makes Seed Oils Harmful to Your Heart?

There’s much debate regarding which foods are healthy to eat and which aren’t, from potatoes and sugar to seed oils that contain omega-6 polyunsaturated fats linked with heart disease. Are seed oils really as harmful as people are making out?
Refined seed oils contain small amounts of oxidized and trans fats, but the real concern lies in what they do to our bodies. Consumption can lead to inflammation as well as suppress your immune system and raise LDL cholesterol levels – increasing risk for prostate, pancreatic, colon, and breast cancers.
Most seed oils contain high concentrations of linoleic acid, an omega-6 polyunsaturated fat known to promote inflammation in humans. Critics of such oils claim that their consumption leads to an inflammatory diet, which in turn may lead to heart disease or other health concerns; however, most evidence supporting such claims comes from laboratory research on animals rather than studies conducted directly with humans.
Seed oils tend to be highly processed, meaning that many of their beneficial properties may be lost during processing compared to unprocessed oils such as olive or coconut oil.
As important, it’s also essential to remember that not all fats are equal. While omega-3 fatty acids get much of the credit for being beneficial, seed oils contain more inflammatory fats, which make them potentially detrimental.
If your heart health is an important consideration, try eliminating seed oils entirely from your diet and replacing them with less processed and more scientifically supported oils such as olive, rapeseed, or avocado oils. Furthermore, make sure that whole foods that naturally contain healthy fats, such as nuts, are part of your daily meal plans.

What Makes Seed Oils Harmful to Your Heart?

What Makes Seed Oils Harmful to Your Heart?

Why Are Seed Oils Bad for Weight Loss?

Have you heard from social media nutritionists or seen on TikTok that seed oils like canola, safflower, cottonseed, sunflower, corn, peanut, and soybean are harmful? Search “seed oils” online, and you will come across numerous claims of their inflammatory and toxic byproducts due to refining processes.
However, a closer examination reveals that seed oils aren’t as dangerous as some believe; rather, many foods containing these oils contain high levels of sodium, sugar, and refined carbs, which cause health issues in their own right, regardless of any potential inflammation from these seeds.
To help make sense of the debate surrounding essential oils, we conducted research using scientific evidence as well as interviewing nutritionists on this subject. Here’s what we discovered:
Seeds that produce these oils contain fatty acids – essential building blocks of cells – as part of their composition. Fatty acids can be divided into monounsaturated fat (MUFAs), polyunsaturated fats (PUFAs) and saturated fats; with the former two being good sources of nourishment while saturated fats may increase risk factors like heart disease, obesity and other chronic illnesses.
Seed oils remain controversial due to their high concentrations of polyunsatured fatty acids (PUFAs), which are known to contribute to inflammation and weight gain as well as metabolic disease. Furthermore, they boast high smoke points meaning they can tolerate higher temperatures for frying and sauteing purposes.
The fact is your body needs both polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and saturated fats to function optimally, but if you want to lose weight, the best strategy is cutting out highly processed and fried foods high in salt, sugar and fatty oils. By doing so, you may notice your body feeling healthier with less bloating as a result and perhaps experience increased energy and less fatigue after stopping these food sources altogether.

Why Are Seed Oils Bad for Weight Loss?

Why Are Seed Oils Bad for Weight Loss?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.