Discovering the Dangers Of Certain Seed Oils

By Tom Seest

Are Some Seed Oils Unsafe?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oil by collating information and news about seed oils.

Industrial seed oils – such as corn, cottonseed, canola, and soybean – are the foundation of most ultra-processed foods and contribute significantly to destructive monocrop agriculture, depleting our soil and farmland resources.
Nutritionists sometimes advise against seed oils due to their high omega-6 polyunsaturated content, which the body converts into pro-inflammatory compounds. However, cooking with them at home and alongside other nutrient-rich foods does not pose any significant issues.

Are Some Seed Oils Unsafe?

Are Some Seed Oils Unsafe?

Is Canola Oil Really as Healthy as You Think?

As Americans began shifting away from animal fats like butter and lard decades ago, seed oils quickly gained in popularity as cooking staples. Now, they can be found across grocery stores and restaurants alike.
But if you use these oils frequently to fry food, they could expose both you and your family to harmful chemicals. That’s because these oils often contain high concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids which, when exposed to heat, react with oxygen molecules in the air and release free radicals into your system – damaging cells and creating harmful byproducts such as free radicals that are known as oxidation reactions.
Polyunsaturated fats exposed to high temperatures over an extended period can degrade, creating rancid oils that have been linked to heart disease. Oxidized fats contribute to inflammation in the body and may increase cholesterol. Many experts attribute seed oils’ pro-inflammatory qualities to their omega-6 fatty acid content – specifically their high concentration of linoleic acid, which converts into arachidonic acid – a component that builds compounds that promote inflammation.
Although omega-6 fatty acids aren’t inherently bad, it’s essential that we balance our diets with omega-3 fats as well. While an ideal situation would see both components present equally, most modern diets contain up to 20 times more omega-6 than omega-3.
Refining makes oils like canola more stable at high temperatures, but at the same time, strips them of protective compounds – like vitamin E and phenols that may benefit your health – that are necessary to keep you safe from illness. Therefore, Hynes and Freeland-Graves advise switching out seed oils for high-quality vegetable oils that can handle lower heat settings, like olive, avocado, or refined coconut oils – when selecting vegetable-based oils, remember to change frequently without reheating.

Is Canola Oil Really as Healthy as You Think?

Is Canola Oil Really as Healthy as You Think?

Are You Still Consuming Corn Oil?

One piece of advice you might hear when it comes to nutrition on social media and podcasts is avoiding seed oils, as these cooking and salad oils have been linked with chronic inflammation and health problems. Common seed oils made from soybeans, corn, rapeseed (canola), cottonseed, sunflower, and safflower seeds – collectively dubbed the hateful eight – contain too many omega-6 fatty acids, which have anti-inflammatory effects and trigger pro-inflammatory chemical production by your body.
Heating unhealthy fats causes them to oxidize and produce harmful byproducts, not to mention they’re loaded with calories without providing much nutritional benefit – one tablespoon of canola oil contains more calories than three ounces of smoked salmon or one cup of edamame!
In addition to their anti-inflammatory properties, crops used to produce seed oils are genetically modified and often use harmful herbicides like glyphosate in cultivation. This practice damages both soil health and plant vitality while contributing to deforestation and climate change.
Replace industrial seed oils with more nutritious fats such as extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) and coconut oil, or Cultured Oil, an innovative fermentation-derived cooking oil rich in heart-healthy monounsaturates with high smoke point and neutral flavor for maximum enjoyment of food without further inflammation. By switching over, you’ll enjoy delicious meals without the additional irritation caused by industrial seed oils.

Are You Still Consuming Corn Oil?

Are You Still Consuming Corn Oil?

Why is Cottonseed Oil Posing a Health Risk?

Cottonseed oil may not be as well known as canola, corn and safflower oils; however, it remains widely used in prepackaged snacks and fried restaurant food items. With its higher smoke point than many other vegetable oils and its lower saturated fat levels, cottonseed oil makes an excellent addition to diets which mandate reduced levels of saturated fat intake.
Cottonseed oil suffers from unstable polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Olive and avocado oils contain heart-healthy PUFAs that oxidize quickly under light and heat conditions, rendering their content rancid before reaching your shopping cart. To address this, manufacturers hydrogenate the PUFAs to make them more stable – however, this process produces trans fats linked with heart disease, which should be avoided at all costs.
Cotton seed oil is also an abundant source of gossypol, a phenolic compound found in cotton stems, seeds, and leaves that acts as both an insecticide and is toxic to humans when consumed in large amounts. Gossypol binds with amino or free carboxy groups in proteins, which decreases their bioavailability, reduces bioavailability, and leads to potential toxicity issues for human consumers.
To combat the negative impacts of too many polyunsaturated (PUFAs), try switching to plant-based oils that contain heart-healthy monounsaturated fats like Cultured Oil from Zero Acre Farms. Our non-GMO cultured oil is produced through fermenting whole vegetables and fruits for maximum monounsaturated fat content with a neutral flavor and high smoke point – perfect for high-heat cooking applications while offering healthier alternatives than industrial seed oils.

Why is Cottonseed Oil Posing a Health Risk?

Why is Cottonseed Oil Posing a Health Risk?

What Makes Soybean Oil a Risky Choice?

Seed oil critics often point to studies that demonstrate a correlation between omega-6-rich industrial seed oils and obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and chronic inflammation – as well as their use – and chronic illnesses like obesity. Some even use graphs as proof.
Unfortunately, such studies can often be flawed and misleading to understand their real effects properly.
At its core, industrial seed oils contain omega-6 fatty acids, which make them cheaper to produce than animal fats and are prized for their heat stability; this allows them to be reused multiple times and reach high temperatures, making them perfect for deep frying in restaurants and commercial foods.
Heating these PUFAs produces harmful hydroxides and aldehydes that may damage cells and contribute to inflammation in the body, especially when oil is reheated frequently in restaurants, which then breaks down further into compounds that could lead to cell mutation or damage DNA. This issue becomes especially concerning when oil is then refrigerated since this exposes diners to additional risks from eating out frequently reusing used oils that have undergone repeated heat treatments before being served back for consumption by another customer.
Fry foods like French fries and packaged snacks tend to be low in important nutrients, making it more advantageous to limit overall intake and consume whole foods rich in healthy fats such as avocado, olive, and coconut oils.

What Makes Soybean Oil a Risky Choice?

What Makes Soybean Oil a Risky Choice?

Is Sunflower Oil Causing Harm to Your Health?

Most people know that seed oils are heavily processed and contain too many omega-6 fatty acids, leading to inflammation and other health problems. Now, many nutrition experts are strongly encouraging people to switch out industrial oils and go with healthier options like avocado or olive oil instead.
Critics of these oils note that refining seed oils can cause healthy unsaturated fats to oxidize, leading to pro-inflammatory molecules and trans fats that may be unhealthy for workers and the environment. Furthermore, extracting these oils requires chemicals like hexane that could prove hazardous both to workers as well as the environment.
An additional downside of these oils is their genetic modification. Crops used to make them can often be genetically engineered to resist herbicides like glyphosate, which may be harmful both to people and the environment.
Some contend that cooking with these oils causes toxic buildup in the body, especially if one uses the same oil for long periods. This is usually only an issue if new oils are used each time or only when heating for brief durations of time.
At the core, whether or not industrial seed oils are bad for you ultimately comes down to what type of diet you follow. Most people can get enough healthy fats by eating whole foods like avocado, nuts, and olive oil or small amounts of animal products such as tallow and butter in small amounts; these sources contain fiber, vitamins, and minerals not found in refined seed oils, as well as helping maintain an appropriate balance between omega-6 fatty acids and omega-3s fatty acids in our bodies.

Is Sunflower Oil Causing Harm to Your Health?

Is Sunflower Oil Causing Harm to Your Health?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.