The Truth About Seed Oils

By Tom Seest

Are Some Seed Oils Worse for You?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oil by collating information and news about seed oils.

Searching social media or TikTok will likely reveal many claims that seed oils are detrimental to our health, yet does that hold true?
Most popular cooking and salad oils come from seeds such as canola, sunflower, safflower, corn, and rice bran and contain both omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated.

Are Some Seed Oils Worse for You?

Are Some Seed Oils Worse for You?

Is Canola Oil Really as Healthy as You Think?

Canola (or rapeseed oil) is one of the most widely consumed vegetable oils in North America and features prominently as an ingredient in many processed food products.
Canola oil is a polyunsaturated fat with an assortment of monounsaturated and omega-3 fatty acids, as well as some saturated lipids. These fatty acids may help lower heart disease risk while supporting skin and hair health.
Seed oils such as canola contain omega-6 fatty acids that have been linked to inflammation. Linoleic acid, one of the key omega-6s found in seed oils, can be converted by your body into arachidonic acid, leading to further inflammation in your body.
Critics of seed oils allege they contain harmful byproducts from their manufacturing process, such as heat and solvents like hexane being used to extract it, leaving residues behind that go rancid quickly, resulting in health concerns for consumers.
Many of the claims regarding seed oils may be accurate; however, it’s essential to recognize that they don’t tell the whole story. Most health professionals agree that ultra-processed foods – often including seed oils but often also high in sugar, saturated fat, salt and preservatives – are usually responsible.
Some may prefer animal fats such as tallow or butter as an alternative source of omega-3s and MUFAs; however, these fats aren’t as stable. Furthermore, they may increase blood pressure. Instead, whole food sources like vegetables provide better ways of meeting our health fat needs naturally.

Is Canola Oil Really as Healthy as You Think?

Is Canola Oil Really as Healthy as You Think?

Is Sunflower Oil Causing Harm to Your Health?

Sunflower oil is an indispensable cooking fat used for salad dressings and sauteing vegetables and as an ingredient in commercially processed food products such as popcorn, cookies, and crackers. Due to its high smoke point (allowing it to withstand high heat levels) and processing abilities, sunflower oil makes an ideal candidate for deep frying and other high-heat cooking methods; unfortunately, due to misinformed social media memes, however, seed oils have developed a reputation as health hazards; these fears however, are unjustified.
Seed oil critics frequently focus on omega-6 fat linoleic acid found in most seed oils, which has been linked to poor health outcomes. But it’s important to remember that all three types of fat (saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated) are present in various amounts; distinguishing low-oleic sunflower oils from mid-oleic and high-oleic varieties is also vital – low-oleic sunflower oil contains mostly monounsaturated fatty acids with very small percentages of saturated fat while mid-oleic and high-oleic varieties contain more polyunsaturated fatty acids with less saturated fat content; low-oleic sunflower oils contain predominantly monounsaturated fatty acids with minimal percentages of saturated fat; mid-oleic and high-oleic sunflower oils differ accordingly in terms of their contents as opposed to saturated ones;
One of the primary concerns surrounding seed oils is their refining process, which often uses chemical solvents like hexane. This may expose them to potentially toxic chemicals as well as create small amounts of trans fats which have been linked to cardiovascular disease and inflammation.
Seed oils contain vulnerable polyunsaturates that are susceptible to rancidification when exposed to heat and oxygen, such as during refining processes or storage/frying processes; these oxidized fats have been known to be unhealthy – however, it’s worth remembering that omega-6 fatty acids found in seed oils tend to be healthier alternatives to animal and dairy fats.

Is Sunflower Oil Causing Harm to Your Health?

Is Sunflower Oil Causing Harm to Your Health?

Is Flaxseed Oil Actually Bad for You?

Flaxseed oil is one of the least inflammatory seed oils. It provides an abundance of omega-3 fats, monounsaturated, and other healthful components than other oils do, but is also high in omega-6 polyunsaturated fats, which have been shown to convert to arachidonic acid and cause inflammation within our bodies – too many omega-6 polyunsaturates could contribute to chronic inflammation which is linked to health conditions like diabetes, heart disease, depression arthritis cancer as well as certain autoimmune diseases like eczema or Sjogren’s syndrome.
Flaxseed oil detractors assert that polyunsaturated fats easily converted to inflammatory compounds are unhealthy and should be avoided, but this claim ignores the fact that refined vegetable and cooking oils tend to mutate into toxic fats due to being processed to remove beneficial phytochemicals with antioxidant properties and other desirable qualities. Furthermore, exposure to heat and light makes refined vegetable and cooking oils more susceptible to oxidation than whole foods (like berries, avocados, olives, and peanut butter) with similar polyunsaturated content.
Flaxseed oil contains high levels of omega-6 fats yet still offers some folk or traditional uses that make it worthwhile to include in one’s diet. Perhaps its most notable use is as a constipation reliever, acting as a natural lubricant to the colon and in cancer prevention programs because it may help inhibit tumor growth while minimizing chemotherapy side effects. You can add it to low-heat cooking or mix it with yogurt or cottage cheese to emulsify it for easy digestion.

Is Flaxseed Oil Actually Bad for You?

Is Flaxseed Oil Actually Bad for You?

Is Hemp Oil Harming Your Health?

Hemp seed oil contains less than 10% saturated fats and 70-80% polyunsaturated fatty acids, making it a good source of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, vitamin E, and alpha-linolenic and gamma-linolenic acids that reduce inflammation as well as protein. Although hemp seed oil offers many nutritional advantages, its benefits should come from whole food sources like nuts, avocados, or seeds rather than processed oils.
Hemp oil should also be avoided due to its extraction process using hexane, a toxic solvent that leaves residues behind and can have adverse health consequences when used by workers who use it. Furthermore, hemp seed oil isn’t organic as its processing and refining are likely contaminated with chemicals from this process.
Remember, even organic seed oils may still cause harm as their molecular structures remain the same as conventional ones. Although organic standards can reduce exposure to harmful chemicals used for agriculture and refining processes, they cannot alter how your body processes PUFAs.
Unrefined hemp seed oil is an excellent choice. Because it does not undergo the same refining process as other oils, hemp seed oil preserves protective compounds like vitamin E and phenols while boasting an ideal 3:1 ratio between omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids – beneficial in improving cholesterol levels and decreasing inflammation – making it suitable for salad dressings, mayonnaise, massages into skin areas with dryness such as acne psoriasis dermatitis or any other skin conditions, strengthening nails against brittleness while encouraging faster nail growth.

Is Hemp Oil Harming Your Health?

Is Hemp Oil Harming Your Health?

Is Olive Oil Really as Healthy as You Think?

According to the ZOE Science & Nutrition podcast, the popular perception of seed oils as unhealthy or toxic stems from social media influencers. They may assert that seed oils contain high levels of omega-6 polyunsaturated, yet there’s no clinical research to support their claims. In truth, however, moderate consumption of seed oils should be fine when not combined with too many ultra-processed food items; the Dietary Guidelines recommend two tablespoons daily as part of a 2000-calorie diet – whether olive or avocado oils can be great options nourishing sources!
Seed oils break down and degrade when heated, producing harmful compounds that can cause inflammation. Freeland-Graves and Hynes assert that eating reheated oil may also contribute to locked-up body fat, foggy brain, low energy, and increased cravings for sugary treats.
For optimal results, purchase fresh, quality olive oil and store it in an opaque environment. Olive oil may not be as susceptible to oxidation as other seed oils, yet its quality may degrade over time. Store it in a cool, dark area in your pantry to avoid damage and keep it away from any sources of heat (including the stove ). Furthermore, avoid purchasing or using old or damaged bottles which may contain rancid oil. Storage oil in a hot kitchen and using it repeatedly for deep frying can lead to build-ups of toxic hexane and synthetic antioxidants, which is not good for your health or the environment. In order to be certain that your oil is safe, always purchase from a trustworthy brand with comprehensive safety checks in place.

Is Olive Oil Really as Healthy as You Think?

Is Olive Oil Really as Healthy as You Think?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.