Maximize Flavor with the Perfect Seed Oil Ratio

By Tom Seest

Are You Using the Right Amount Of Seed Oil In Your Cooking?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oil by collating information and news about seed oils.

For those in search of healthy vegetable oils to use in their cooking, sunflower, canola, linseed and grapeseed oils make excellent options.
These foods contain healthy fats such as omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, but are susceptible to oxidation (the reaction between fats and oxygen), leading to potentially harmful compounds being formed.

Are You Using the Right Amount Of Seed Oil In Your Cooking?

Are You Using the Right Amount Of Seed Oil In Your Cooking?

Are You Using the Right Amount of Seed Oil?

If you’re undecided whether to incorporate unrefined seed oils into your cooking, here are a few things you should keep in mind. First and foremost is that unrefined oil contains many of the same essential nutrients found in whole food such as omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants as its refined counterpart.
How much seed oil you should take depends on how many calories you consume and whether your goal is to decrease or increase fat consumption. As a general guideline, for a 2000-calorie diet it would be optimal to consume roughly two tablespoons per day of seed oil supplements.
Seed oils contain a blend of various fatty acids that benefit our health, such as monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and saturated. Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats help lower cholesterol while saturated fats raise it further.
However, seeds contain more than just essential fatty acids; they also contain phytosterols, which help lower cholesterol levels in the blood.
Unrefined seed oil is more cost-effective than more costly oils like olive and avocado oils, which makes it the go-to choice in restaurants and other food establishments looking to reduce costs by choosing less costly cooking fats like seed oils over more costly cooking fats.
Note that unrefined seed oils do not undergo the same refining process as refined oils do, keeping their beneficial fatty acid profiles undisturbed and making even a small amount just as nutritious as its refined counterpart.
Refined seed oils undergo an intensive refining process designed to remove phytonutrients and other desirable compounds present in their raw state and reduce or destroy antioxidant properties while increasing trans-fatty content. This results in higher overall trans fats.
These harmful fats, known as trans fats, have the potential to pose serious health hazards. Their processing may release harmful ‘free radicals’ which damage cells and trigger inflammation throughout the body.
Seed oils often feature a high smoke point temperature at which they begin to burn and release harmful toxins into the environment, so it’s wise to avoid using them when performing high-heat cooking methods like frying.
That is why it is crucial to select only organic and non-GMO seed oils. GMO oils may have been exposed to toxic herbicides and environmental pollutants, which could potentially harm both people and the planet.
If you want to use unrefined seed oils in cooking, the best way to keep them fresher for longer is to store them away from heat and light. Unrefined oils tend to go rancid more quickly than refined varieties, so use them sparingly.
Unrefined seed oils require some research before finding their optimal use in recipes, but you’ll likely find they’re both safe and nutritious – in fact, they may even make for an ideal addition to an already healthful diet!

Are You Using the Right Amount of Seed Oil?

Are You Using the Right Amount of Seed Oil?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.