Uncovering the Truth About Seed Oils

By Tom Seest

Are You Using the Wrong Seed Oils?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oil by collating information and news about seed oils.

Many of us consume seed oils through highly processed food items like pastries, French fries, and packaged snacks that contain them. Unfortunately, these inflammatory fats have been linked with heart disease, inflammation, and chronic conditions such as autoimmune disorders or chronic bowel issues.
These oils contain polyunsaturated fats (omega-6 and omega-3) that are susceptible to oxidation. Relying on them regularly for cooking tasks (such as deep-frying) poses a potential problem.

Are You Using the Wrong Seed Oils?

Are You Using the Wrong Seed Oils?

Why should you steer clear of Canola Oil?

Seed oils are refined vegetable fats derived from canola, soybean, cottonseed, corn, sunflower, peanut, and safflower seeds, usually processed using high heat and chemicals such as hexane (a solvent with potential health risks to workers). Some people consider seed oils unhealthy due to being low-nutrient dense; additionally, they can oxidize easily under high heat, creating dangerous trans fats that may increase inflammation.
Others allege that canola oil exacerbates inflammation due to its omega-6 fatty acids (like linoleic acid ) increasing arachidonic acid levels, the building block for inflammation mediators. But the truth is much simpler.
As American society becomes more distrustful of conventional healthcare organizations and public health bodies, many Americans are conducting their own research and have discovered that industrialized seed oils may not be as healthy as organic oils from coconuts, olives, and butter, although they remain better cooking options than saturated or synthetic trans fats.
Harvard Health reports that people who consume more oil-rich diets can still maintain heart health, though replacing these fats with those found in avocados, nuts, and seafood would provide better nutritional benefits. Furthermore, using healthier cooking methods such as roasting, sauteing, or stir-frying instead is recommended to achieve maximum benefit from these oils.

Why should you steer clear of Canola Oil?

Why should you steer clear of Canola Oil?

Why is Sunflower Oil Harmful?

Some experts advise against eating sunflower, safflower and generic “vegetable” oils because of their high concentration of omega-6 fats, since your body converts these omega-6s into arachidonic acid that increases inflammation throughout your body – leading to chronic health conditions as a result.
Unfortunately, this assertion is unsubstantiated by evidence. All seed oils contain polyunsaturated; while omega-6 fatty acids may promote inflammation through direct pathways, research doesn’t support such claims.
These fats can often be found in processed and packaged foods high in sodium, sugar and refined carbs – eating less of these will naturally decrease your seed oil consumption.
If you decide to use sunflower-derived oils in your kitchen, look for high oleic varieties made with newer varieties of sunflower and featuring higher concentrations of monounsaturated fats – these will be more stable under high heat conditions and less likely to turn rancid over time.
While whole foods (like avocado, salmon and walnuts ) provide us with healthy fats, including seeds or vegetable oils can also provide healthful fats and help manage blood pressure, cholesterol levels and keep blood sugar in check. Just be wary not to overdo it – seed and vegetable oils contain many calories!

Why is Sunflower Oil Harmful?

Why is Sunflower Oil Harmful?

Is Olive Oil Actually Healthy?

Olive oil is a healthy monounsaturated fat, rich in oleic acid – considered one of the three key fatty acids for good health – as well as other essential fatty acids like linoleic and palmitic acids, plus small amounts of squalene and tocosterols. Due to its high smoke point, olive oil is ideal for high-heat cooking applications; when selecting one, make sure it has been stored in dark bottles to protect it from light degradation that could potentially cause rancidity and worsen its flavor over time.
Some health experts advise against seed oils due to their high content of omega-6 polyunsaturated, which can contribute to inflammation in the body. Arachidonic acid, found within omega-6 fatty acids, has long been linked with this type of inflammation.
Other researchers, however, disagree. According to them, it isn’t the seed oils themselves that are harmful; rather, it’s our diet of highly processed food with excessive amounts of these oils combined with additional additives such as sugar, salt, and saturated fat that contributes to chronic illnesses. If you do opt for using seed oil in salad dressings and cold sauces as an ingredient source – look for one with high omega-3 fat levels, such as flaxseed or hempseed oil, which offers healthier options than its alternatives.

Is Olive Oil Actually Healthy?

Is Olive Oil Actually Healthy?

Is Sesame Oil Damaging Your Health?

Sesame oil is an indispensable pantry item, adding deliciously nutty notes to sauteed vegetables or salads and vinaigrettes. Available both refined and unrefined varieties (Tanzania is one of the largest producers) or as a toasted variety which adds depth to cooking or can even serve as a delicious condiment, sesame oil can become part of everyday cuisine with ease.
Sesame seeds contain many essential vitamins and minerals, including zinc and iron, that contribute to blood production, circulation, and metabolism. Furthermore, these seeds are an excellent source of protein and omega-3 fats; sesame oil provides both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, but the latter may oxidize when heated to create harmful byproducts.
Health experts often advise avoiding seed oils in favor of healthier alternatives like tallow, butter, or ghee and extra virgin olive oil that contain saturated and monounsaturated fats that don’t easily convert to oxidized byproducts in the body.
Seed oils like canola, safflower and generic “vegetable” oils contain polyunsaturates that can easily be converted to pro-inflammatory compounds in your body, leading to chronic conditions like cardiovascular disease and inflammation. By choosing whole foods such as avocados and extra-virgin olive oil instead, it will prevent an excessive intake of pro-inflammatory fats while helping balance out your diet.

Is Sesame Oil Damaging Your Health?

Is Sesame Oil Damaging Your Health?

Is Flaxseed Oil Harming Your Health?

Seed oils such as canola, safflower, and generic “vegetable oil” contain polyunsaturated that are vulnerable to becoming rancid during refining processes, shelf storage, or in the frying pan – leading to inflammation that contributes to chronic conditions like heart disease.
Have you seen those social media memes comparing industrial seed oils to chronic diseases like diabetes and obesity? While these graphs may be attractive and simple to comprehend, they don’t tell the full picture.
Not only are oils problematic, but so is the food they’re found in, often highly processed with added sugar, salt, and food additives – contributing to inflammation as a leading cause of many chronic diseases.
Studies have shown that regular consumption of seed oils containing omega-6 fatty acid linoleic acid can convert to pro-inflammatory arachidonic acid, prompting many health experts to urge people to cut back on these oils. Instead, health experts advise eating foods rich in omega-3s like fish oil and flaxseed oil, as well as plant sources like chia seeds, quinoa, rapeseeds, and walnuts, which supply omega-6s; high-quality fats such as extra virgin olive oil provide additional sources. In doing so, your body gets more omega-3s, which promote health, while less of their pro-inflammatory counterparts.

Is Flaxseed Oil Harming Your Health?

Is Flaxseed Oil Harming Your Health?

What Makes Flaxseed a Problematic Meal Replacement?

Seed oils may not live up to their reputation of being toxic or dangerous, contrary to what some have claimed in online memes and discussion boards. Instead, when used properly and appropriately in diet and health programs, they can actually provide several health advantages.
When purchasing these nutritious fats, seek cold-pressed (without heat) options to limit how many delicate polyunsaturated fatty acids are exposed to high heat during extraction. If this is not feasible, organic standards help minimize chemical-use during production and refining processes and therefore minimize toxicities from production and refinement processes.
Flaxseeds should always be ground into meal before consumption as this allows your body to more easily break them down and digest. Instead, purchase ground flaxseeds at health food stores or even grocery stores for an easy, delicious and healthy way to add flaxseeds into meals.
As part of a well-balanced and healthy diet, it’s essential that we cut back on foods containing seed oils and aim to get our daily allotment (around two tablespoons per 2000 calories) of oil from unrefined sources such as olive, avocado, and flaxseed oils – such as salad dressings and sauces containing these nourishing oils (about two tablespoons for every 2000 calories consumed) such as olive, avocado and flaxseed oils for salad dressings and sauces. This will automatically reduce the intake of harmful PUFAs from seed oils while making room for omega-3-rich foods like seafood, nuts, and seeds while taking advantage of their nutritional properties (plus remembering to control sodium, sugar, and saturated fat intakes!). Of course, don’t forget about keeping sodium, sugar, and saturated fat intakes under control, as this will ensure optimal nutrition!

What Makes Flaxseed a Problematic Meal Replacement?

What Makes Flaxseed a Problematic Meal Replacement?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.