Discover the Truth About Seed Oils

By Tom Seest

Can Seed Oils Actually Be Good?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oil by collating information and news about seed oils.

Seed oils are a delicious ingredient to use in cooking, yet often have an unfavorable reputation. Many industrial seed oils contain toxic hexane compounds.
Seed oils contain omega-6 polyunsaturated fats, which have been linked to inflammation. Although diets rich in these oils can contribute to obesity and heart disease, seed oils shouldn’t be seen as evil sources.

Can Seed Oils Actually Be Good?

Can Seed Oils Actually Be Good?

Are Seed Oils Really Worth the Hype?

Seed oils form the cornerstone of most cooking fats and are an integral component of many Western diets. You’ll find them in mayonnaise, cookies and fried foods; unfortunately they have earned themselves an unfavorable reputation due to containing high concentrations of omega-6 fatty acids which have been linked with chronic illnesses. In order to avoid such oils altogether, many opt to consume more omega-3s.
However, much of the criticism directed at these oils is unwarranted, given there is no scientific proof they pose health risks. Instead, this debate has been driven by donations to medical organizations, dubious research methods, and misleading marketing.
Still, the seed oil debate continues. You can find videos on TikTok and Instagram decrying eight common vegetable oils: canola, cottonseed, sunflower, soybean, corn safflower, and rice bran. Many of these oils are extracted using hexane as a toxic solvent; however, small amounts used during manufacturing processes are harmless; ingestion is more likely during gas pumping sessions than from using cooking oils!
Many highly processed oils like hydrogenated and vegetable oils are subject to extensive processing – they’re heated, deodorized, bleached and decolored in order to improve taste and appearance, with some even coming from industrial mono-crop agriculture that depletes soil resources and contributes to environmental degradation. Therefore, it’s wiser to switch over to more wholesome fat sources like olive or coconut oils instead.
Seed oils often draw criticism due to their fatty acid composition. While all oils contain an assortment of saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fats, critics of seed oils tend to focus on omega-6 polyunsaturates found in these oils because the body converts omega-6s into arachidonic acid – which causes inflammation.
Omega-3 fatty acids have been scientifically shown to reduce inflammation and protect against heart disease, so choosing cooking oils that include both omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids will help safeguard both your heart and mind.

Are Seed Oils Really Worth the Hype?

Are Seed Oils Really Worth the Hype?

What Makes Unrefined Seed Oils So Healthy?

Industrial seed oils may be responsible for many health issues that people are unaware of, like obesity and cardiovascular disease. You’d never suspect it, though: industrial seed oils can be found in common packaged foods like cookies, chips and salad dressing; while our bodies do need fat for energy purposes. It’s essential that we know which varieties are the most beneficial.
Seed oils have recently come under increased scrutiny. Used widely across cuisine, fitness influencers have targeted seed oils with accusations they increase inflammation and contribute to other health concerns – though this claim lacks scientific backing, it does make an impressionful statement about what the public perceives.
Seed oils encompass a wide array of vegetable-based oils, such as canola, corn, soybean, cottonseed, peanut, safflower, and grape seed oils. Most refined seed oils undergo chemical processes to make them more stable at higher temperatures and decrease rancidity risk; typically, this involves refining with acid reduction technology to make these oils less acidic and less likely to rancidity than their unrefined counterparts.
Many individuals are concerned with using oils with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). These PUFAs can be converted to arachidonic acid and lead to inflammation as well as other health complications; experts like health coach and nutritionist Cate Shanahan advise against eating too many PUFAs from seed oils, particularly.
However, while polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may not always be healthy for human health, many are found in seed oils and are essential. Some omega-3 and omega-6 PUFAs have been linked with reduced inflammation and improved cardiovascular well-being, while linoleic acid plays an essential role in immune system functioning.

What Makes Unrefined Seed Oils So Healthy?

What Makes Unrefined Seed Oils So Healthy?

Are Seed Oils Really as Unhealthy as They’re Made Out to Be?

Seed oils are any cooking oil derived from plant seeds like canola, sunflower, sesame, or linseed and used as cooking or salad oils in many common dishes such as fried foods, salad dressings, and baked goods. Furthermore, they’re often drizzled over vegetables or salads as a condiment – although seed oils have often received negative attention due to the high levels of omega-6 fatty acids they contain – they’re far less harmful than many people imagine!
Seed oils have garnered such a poor reputation due to their abundance of omega-6 fatty acids that contribute to inflammation. This, in turn, has led to various health conditions, including heart disease, joint pain, depression, and obesity, but not all omega-6s are created equal: Linoleic acid present in many seed oils is converted by our bodies into arachidonic acid – another type of omega-6 that causes inflammation – making the high omega-6 content of most cooking oils an issue given our Western diets heavily depend on these highly processed oils.
Some experts contend that too much consumption of these oils leads to an imbalance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, which is detrimental to health. Others, however, disagree with this theory and think the high omega-6 content found in cooking oils stems from our society’s current low-fat, processed food diets.
Seed oils don’t pose any significant health hazards when used appropriately for home frying, such as when making eggs at home. But when used at high temperatures for commercial frying operations like french frying & onion ring frying, their use can become harmful or toxic and become poisonous to humans and their environments.
Most cooking oils should be consumed in moderation; however, when choosing cooking oils to consume, it is best to choose whole, unrefined oils such as olive and avocado oil as these contain naturally high concentrations of omega-3s and monounsaturates, like olive and avocado oils. Salmon and walnuts are both excellent plant-based sources of omega-3. Eating well overall and getting enough vitamin E is also critical for good health – unfortunately, though, around 90% of adults fall short of meeting their recommended daily allowances of this essential nutrient!

Are Seed Oils Really as Unhealthy as They're Made Out to Be?

Are Seed Oils Really as Unhealthy as They’re Made Out to Be?

Is Your Heart Missing Out on the Benefits of Seed Oils?

Seed oils such as canola, safflower, corn, cottonseed, soy, soybean, and sunflower oils often get an unfair rap for their fat content. You might have come across alarmist TikTok videos with dramatic music scores decrying them or seen fitness gurus warn against using them at all – one reason being their high levels of omega-6 polyunsaturated, which are considered pro-inflammatory; in particular, our bodies convert linoleic acid – the main omega-6 found in most industrial seed oils – into arachidonic acid which has been linked with various health conditions.
However, no evidence exists to link linoleic acid with inflammation; many studies indicate the opposite may be true. If you want to limit omega-6 intake without harming yourself, opt for whole food sources of these essential fatty acids like salmon, avocados, nuts and seeds instead. Otherwise industrial seed oils might provide an appealing healthy alternative that won’t go rancid as easily.
One issue surrounding these oils is their frequent inclusion in processed food products, which have been linked with poorer health outcomes. Not only do these foods contain unhealthy fats, but they often also contain large quantities of sugar, salt, and additives, which may not be optimal for your heart’s well-being.
These oils are exceptionally stable and possess a higher threshold for heat, making them suitable for frying and other high-heat cooking methods. Therefore, these oils can be found in processed snacks, fast food items, and salad dressings alike.
Seed oils are made from processed seeds that may not contain as many essential vitamins and minerals, so it is wise to reduce the amount of processed food consumed while increasing the intake of healthy oils and fats such as nuts and olives. For further advice on improving your diet, it would be beneficial to speak to one of the providers listed on our online provider directory.

Is Your Heart Missing Out on the Benefits of Seed Oils?

Is Your Heart Missing Out on the Benefits of Seed Oils?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.