Opt for Healthier Oils: the Benefits

By Tom Seest

Can You Avoid Seed Oils for Better Health?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are seed oil curious by collating information and news about seed oils.

Many are concerned about seed oils and their possible adverse health impacts, with critics alleging they contain too many omega-6 fats that are high in linoleic acid content.
Omega-6 fatty acids have been linked with chronic inflammation and an increased risk of disease; however, the proper balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids is vital for overall body wellness.

Can You Avoid Seed Oils for Better Health?

Can You Avoid Seed Oils for Better Health?

What Foods Should You Avoid to Steer Clear of Seed Oils?

Fried foods contain high amounts of fat, which can increase your risk for heart problems if consumed regularly. Therefore, the FDA advises limiting their consumption to no more than once weekly; additionally, they may pose additional health hazards if you suffer from food allergies or are pregnant.
A 2014 study of 111,000 adults found that people who consumed fried foods three or four times each week had a 39% increased risk of type 2 diabetes when compared with those who did not consume any fried food at all. This is likely because seed oils in fried food break down, creating compounds that may be harmful to health.
These unhealthy compounds are not only inflammatory but can also contribute to chronic diseases like obesity, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Canola, sunflower, and safflower oils are often processed using harmful chemical extraction methods that add toxins to their final product; to stay on the safe side, it’s best to choose other healthier choices like olive or coconut oils instead.
If you decide to use seed oil in your cooking, select one with a low smoke point, such as olive or coconut oil, that provides essential fatty acids, including omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids.
Oxidation, which occurs when polyunsaturated fats come into contact with oxygen and heat, producing rancid oils that can lead to health problems like inflammation and decreased immune defenses, should also be considered.
Oxidation occurs when fatty acids lose electrons, leading to instability and making them unhealthy for your body. Oxidation can occur on shelves, in frying pans, and within you; for this reason, it is wiser to store oils and fats in cool storage containers while avoiding deep frying with them.
If you must fry food, opt for butter, ghee, tallow (rendered beef fat), coconut oil, and extra-virgin olive oil as your preferred fats; these don’t contain omega-6 linoleic acid – an inflammatory omega-6 that could prove troublesome at high concentrations.

What Foods Should You Avoid to Steer Clear of Seed Oils?

What Foods Should You Avoid to Steer Clear of Seed Oils?

What Processed Foods Should You Avoid?

Seed oils such as canola oil and linseed oil contain omega-6 fatty acids, which may contribute to inflammation, leading to chronic health conditions such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. It is wise to avoid them.
However, there are ways to limit processed food and avoid eating too many seed oils without harming your health. Step one is shopping around the perimeter of your grocery store rather than its middle aisles, where ultra-processed items high in sugar, salt, and fat may be found.
Step two is to switch out seed oils for extra virgin olive or coconut oils, which are less processed. Both oils can be used in food and baking applications alike.
One way to reduce processed food consumption is to replace them with healthier options such as fresh fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean meats that have higher nutrient density, more fiber, and are more satisfying.
Ultimately, if you do decide to add seed oils into your diet, be sure to opt for cold-pressed options without hydrogenation, which may introduce trans fats. Furthermore, avoid refined seeds such as cottonseed oil or sunflower seed oil as these could contain harmful trans fatty acids.
Consider avoiding seed oils heated beyond their smoke point (the temperature at which oil degrades), as these could produce harmful lipid peroxides that are toxic to health. Most seed oils have smoke points below 180 degrees Fahrenheit, so they’re safe to use in cooking applications but read labels carefully to make sure that there are no hidden sulfites or phthalates present.
Dieting to avoid seed oils is best achieved through adopting an overall healthy lifestyle that includes plenty of fresh fruit, vegetables, lean proteins, and whole grains as part of an overall balanced diet. Eating these nutritious foods will keep you feeling satiated for longer while simultaneously decreasing the risk for chronic diseases and improving overall health.

What Processed Foods Should You Avoid?

What Processed Foods Should You Avoid?

What Are the Benefits of Using Olive Oil?

Olive oil is an excellent way to add healthy fats to your dishes, but its bold flavor may prove challenging when trying to balance other flavors in your recipe. Neutral oils such as canola or vegetable oils tend to work better.
When purchasing olive oil, be sure to purchase only high-quality options. Look for labels reading “extra virgin,” which indicates it has been extracted without using heat or chemicals while having low polyunsaturated levels.
Fry food with oil that contains low polyunsaturated fatty acids; those high in polyunsaturated fats tend to degrade more easily at higher temperatures and produce harmful compounds that can break down into harmful compounds.
Be creative when using olive oil: try sprinkling it over roasted vegetables or stirring it into soups and stews; it also works great as a finishing oil for grilling vegetables or soft scrambled eggs!
Note that olive oil will deteriorate quickly if stored at room temperature, so use it immediately after buying to extend its shelf life and minimize any unpleasant odors that might remain behind.
For optimal health benefits, select high-quality, pure olive oil made through only cold pressing methods and without chemical additives – these will add antioxidant power and increase its nutritional value.
Selecting a high-quality olive oil will guarantee its distinctive taste since this depends on which kind of olive was harvested at what time.
Olive oils should possess all these desirable qualities in abundance – buttery, fruity, peppery, grassy, and bitter, to name but a few – thanks to the presence of antioxidants called polyphenols.
Researchers recently conducted a study that revealed that people following a Mediterranean diet with extra-virgin olive oil had lower rates of heart disease and cancer compared with those following a control diet, suggesting the anti-inflammatory properties may be at play here.

What Are the Benefits of Using Olive Oil?

What Are the Benefits of Using Olive Oil?

Try a Delicious Homemade Salad Dressing?

If you want to eat healthier, it is important to pay close attention to what goes into your salad dressings. While store-bought varieties might contain artificial additives and corn syrup, making your own can help avoid those potential traps.
Homemade salad dressing can be prepared quickly and conveniently at home, eliminating preservatives and additives found in store-bought versions while offering more control over its flavor by including ingredients like fresh herbs or fruit.
Most store-bought salad dressings contain oil as the primary ingredient, which may present problems for those looking to reduce omega-6 intake. Most often seen are canola oil or soybean oil as bases for these dressings.
Pro-inflammatory oils like soybean, sunflower, and canola oil should be avoided for better overall health. So choose salad dressings made from less oil and superior fat sources like olive oil instead.
Create your own homemade dressing by mixing vinegar and lemon juice together in a blender, adding salt, pepper, herbs or spices, plus creaminess via mustard.
Option two is to make use of homemade emulsifiers, which will help the ingredients bind together and prevent them from separating into separate components of dressing. Potential options for such an emulsifier could include egg yolks, honey, mustard, or mayonnaise as emulsifiers.
Homemade salad dressings can be an easy and nutritious way to incorporate different nutrients into your diet while cutting calories and sodium intake. Plus, making your own dressings can be fun – and take control of your own nutrition!
Salads provide the foundation of a healthy, balanced diet. And with the appropriate dressing, they can even become even better options.
Store-bought dressings may be convenient, but they often contain ingredients you don’t want to consume, such as high fructose corn syrup and artificial sweeteners. By creating your own homemade salad dressings, you can save money and be healthier at the same time.

Try a Delicious Homemade Salad Dressing?

Try a Delicious Homemade Salad Dressing?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.