Keep Your Sesame Oil Fresh: Refrigerate Now!

By Tom Seest

Do You Need to Refrigerate Sesame Seed Oil?

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Sesame seed oil is made from sesame seeds that have been roasted and then processed to extract their oils. While commercial producers use modernized production processes that involve heating or processing with chemicals to remove impurities from the oil, small-batch producers such as Dong He utilizes traditional techniques that keep both the flavor and nutritional benefits of sesame seeds intact.

Do You Need to Refrigerate Sesame Seed Oil?

Do You Need to Refrigerate Sesame Seed Oil?

Where Should Sesame Seed Oil Be Stored?

Do you still want that bottle of sesame seed oil in your pantry that has passed its expiration date? If not, now may be a good time to let it go.
Sesame oil should always be stored in a dark and cool location; otherwise, it will quickly turn rancid upon coming into contact with air, light, or heat. Any exposure will cause its quality to diminish over time so ensure you keep it out of direct sunlight and heat as much as possible.
Refrigeration will extend its shelf life significantly. Toasted oils, in particular, benefit from being stored in sealed containers to extend their shelf life and preserve freshness for much longer than they would without refrigeration.
Cold storage conditions allow plain sesame oil to keep its quality for up to one-year post-opening; for toasted varieties, it extends that lifespan considerably by locking away their antioxidants and phenols for much longer.
Toasted sesame oil can be stored in the refrigerator for six months. Depending on its environment and storage temperature, however, this could make it thicker than at room temperature and require you to pour more slowly and carefully.
Toasting this oil gives it a richer, more aromatic flavor than its non-toasted counterpart; however, over time, it may lose some of its fragrance or may become unpleasant to the palette. If your toasted oil has been sitting around for some time now, it can no longer smell the way it used to and has become quite bitter-tasting in flavor.
Additionally, you should regularly inspect your oil for signs of changes in color or smell that could indicate it has gone rancid. Dark spots could indicate spoilage.
Another way to detect whether an oil has gone bad is if it smells sour or bitter; this indicates it could have become rancid and should be discarded immediately.
If your sesame oil has a subtle, nutty aroma, that’s an excellent indicator that it is fresh. Conversely, if it smells burned-ish, then this could indicate potential spoilage issues.

Where Should Sesame Seed Oil Be Stored?

Where Should Sesame Seed Oil Be Stored?

Does Storing Sesame Seed Oil Require Special Considerations?

Sesame oil, like any edible oil, will become rancid upon exposure to oxygen. Oxidation breaks down triglyceride fat molecules into glycerol and free fatty acids; good storage practices may slow this process, but eventually, it will take place.
Because sesame oil can easily spoil in sunlight and heat sources, you should store it in a cool environment in a tightly-sealed bottle or store it in the refrigerator after opening to extend its shelf life.
Storage options for sesame oil include dark glass bottles – ideally green or brown in color – stored away from both stovetops and refrigerators.
Purchase smaller, reusable bottles instead of larger tins to help prevent oil oxidization since these smaller containers allow less room for air circulation once full of oil.
Keep your sesame oil stored in its original packaging until ready for use, as air can rapidly degrade fresh sesame oil. Doing this will preserve its delicious nutty aroma until you need it.
Specialty stores or online can offer a selection of sesame oils, such as light and dark varieties. Dark sesame oil made from toasted sesame seeds has a stronger flavor than light sesame oil, making it the better option as a finishing oil.
While toasted dark sesame oil can be used for cooking, high-heat applications require using another oil with a higher smoke point, such as avocado or extra virgin olive oil.
Toasted sesame oil adds an exotic twist to salad dressings, marinades, and sauces. Plus, it can even be used as an exterior coating before grilling meats such as chicken and fish!
The smoking point of this oil is 450 degrees Fahrenheit, making it suitable for low or medium-heat cooking or drizzling over soups, stir-fries, and other dishes.
Sesame oil’s rich, nutty flavor is a staple ingredient in Asian cuisine. You can find various brands at specialty stores or purchase them online from retailers such as Amazon.

Does Storing Sesame Seed Oil Require Special Considerations?

Does Storing Sesame Seed Oil Require Special Considerations?

Keep Sesame Seed Oil Fresh: Is Refrigeration Necessary?

If you have opened and stored sesame seed oil for some time, you may be wondering how long it can be stored in the fridge. Unfortunately, that answer depends on both its type and how you keep it stored.
Refrigeration can help light-colored sesame oil keep its freshness for up to a year, while darker hues last approximately six months. Both varieties should be stored in this manner to preserve their nuttiness and flavors for extended use.
Refrigerating sesame seed oil is important because it reduces oxidation processes that cause rancidity in oils, as well as keeping it from congealing too thickly and becoming rancid over time. Furthermore, refrigeration also keeps its thickness down over time as it becomes thicker over time.
Sesame oil should always be stored in a dark and cool environment to protect it from light exposure and heat oxidation, which could accelerate rancidity faster.
As sesame oil can quickly go rancid if stored improperly, it is vital that it is kept in a dark and cool environment such as a pantry or kitchen cabinet. To maximize preservation, ensure its container has its lid securely fastened.
Avoid adding new oil into old bottles that have already been used since even just a small amount of used oil could accelerate rancidification processes.
One way to protect your sesame oil is to purchase from a conscientious small-batch producer who prioritizes product quality while striving to move inventory as quickly as possible – this way, there won’t be too much chance for spoilage before its shelf life ends. Ideally, this means selling smaller bottles that won’t sit around too long before needing to be replaced with fresh oil from somewhere else.
When purchasing sesame seed oil, it is crucial that you choose high-quality yet cost-effective products. Doing so ensures you won’t pay a fortune for oil that spoils quickly; otherwise, you risk not being able to use it as long and will eventually have to throw it away prematurely.

Keep Sesame Seed Oil Fresh: Is Refrigeration Necessary?

Keep Sesame Seed Oil Fresh: Is Refrigeration Necessary?

Does Freezing Sesame Seed Oil Prolong Its Shelf Life?

Sesame seed oil is an extremely delicate product, so proper storage is key to its viability and shelf life extension. Storing it in a cool, dark area helps it remain fresh for extended shelf life.
Sesame oil is an all-natural nut-based fat and, similar to other oils, can deteriorate naturally over time due to oxidation and hydrolysis processes. Oxidation breaks down triglyceride fat molecules into glycerol and free fatty acids, eventually leading to rancidity.
Sesame oil will inevitably spoil over time, but you can delay its effects by storing it in a cool and dry location away from heat and light sources. Furthermore, keeping it stored in sealed jars may extend its freshness for even longer.
At best, sesame seed oil should be consumed within one year after opening it; you can extend its shelf life further by keeping it refrigerated or frozen after you open it.
Frozen oil can quickly and effectively use up large quantities. Small plastic bottles or an ice tray is an efficient way of doing this.
When storing oil in the freezer, ensure it is sealed to prevent air or moisture from entering or make sure its bottle doesn’t allow too much air circulation.
If your oil begins to smell or taste rancid, it has likely become spoiled due to exposure to too much oxygen or heat sources. This could indicate long-term storage or overexposure in other ways.
Before using oil, it is a good idea to check its quality by sniffing and inspecting its appearance.
Over time, sesame oil may turn darker and lose its pleasant odor. You can use a spoon to scrape the bottom of the bottle to check whether or not there has been a change in appearance, color, or texture.
If your sesame oil has an off-putting smell or taste, it is likely spoiled and should be discarded immediately. Though still edible, its quality may diminish significantly over time.

Does Freezing Sesame Seed Oil Prolong Its Shelf Life?

Does Freezing Sesame Seed Oil Prolong Its Shelf Life?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.