Uncover the Truth About Seed Oil Benefits

By Tom Seest

Does Seed Oil Harm Your Skin?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oil by collating information and news about seed oils.

Seed oil can be found in many processed foods and is often used for cooking purposes. When consumed without adequate amounts of omega-3 fatty acids (like seed oil), too much polyunsaturated fat consumption (including seed oil consumption ) can increase inflammation and risk for chronic diseases like cardiovascular disease.
Seed oils can be produced using canola, rapeseed, grapeseed, corn, cottonseed or soybeans; then refined, bleached, deodorized and extracted using chemicals like hexane.

Does Seed Oil Harm Your Skin?

Does Seed Oil Harm Your Skin?

What’s the Deal with Omega-6 in Seed Oil?

The human diet has undergone dramatic changes over the last century, due in large part to our increased consumption of seed oil. This consumption has resulted in an imbalance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in our diets that has been linked with acne, eczema, and skin cancer among other issues.
But there’s good news! There is an easy and straightforward solution for balancing out the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 in your skin care.
One effective strategy for treating acne-related inflammatory skin conditions such as pimples is shifting the balance of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids,” according to Dhaval Bhanusali, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in New York City.
He advises incorporating foods containing high levels of omega-3 fatty acids such as sardines and salmon into your diet to achieve an ideal ratio and help decrease acne, skin inflammation, sun damage, and risk for skin cancer. This could potentially help decrease these issues.
Studies of healthy adults conducted between 2001 and 2003 demonstrated that those consuming higher quantities of omega-3 fatty acids experienced less acne and oilier skin. Participants with a greater ratio of omega-3s to omega-6s also enjoyed better overall skin health.
Gmyrek notes, “Omega fatty acids can be obtained in various ways through both food and supplements; it’s important to find what works for your individual lifestyle.
She suggests applying omega fatty acids directly onto the skin as anti-inflammatory agents that can help fade hyperpigmentation, moisturize rough skin and heal wounds more efficiently.
Furthermore, they can help diminish fine lines and wrinkles as well as protect against UV rays and oxidative stress (the accumulation of free radicals that damage cells).
Omega fatty acids make an easy addition to any skincare regimen; whether they’re being consumed internally or topically applied, you’re sure to see results quickly. We have put together some of our favourite products featuring omega fatty acids for you to get you started!

What's the Deal with Omega-6 in Seed Oil?

What’s the Deal with Omega-6 in Seed Oil?

Is Your Skin Missing Out on Omega-3s?

Many of us mistakenly think seed oil is bad for skin, when in reality it provides plenty of beneficial fatty acids such as alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). This form of omega-3 can be found in plant sources like flaxseed (linseed), chia seeds and walnuts. Your body doesn’t produce its own supply so eating these sources regularly or taking supplements is necessary in order to receive this important nourishment.
Seed oil contains low levels of essential omega-3 fats such as EPA and DHA that contribute to skin health, such as helping reduce inflammation and improving its appearance. These omega-3s also play an essential role in helping reduce stress-related skin inflammation.
Omega-3 fats can be found in food sources like fish, krill oil, and oils derived from nuts and seeds; however, most people don’t consume enough of these fatty acids in their diets to receive all their benefits.
Modern diets typically contain an imbalance between omega-6 and omega-3 fats, thought to contribute to chronic inflammation. Multiple observational studies link higher consumption of omega-3s from fish and seafood with better health outcomes; however, more data from randomized clinical trials are necessary in order to ascertain if their benefits come solely from omega-3s or if other elements may play a part.
To address this, one effective strategy to increase omega-3 to omega-6 ratios is by eating more fish and other omega-3-rich foods – such as seafood, fish oil supplements, nuts, seeds, or plant-based omega-3 rich sources such as chia seeds or walnuts.
An appropriate ratio between omega-3 and omega-6 fats is vital for skin health. According to research, too much omega-6 can trigger inflammation symptoms as well as increase your risk for conditions like atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and other skin ailments.
Omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA can be found in most animal foods, particularly fish. Grass-fed meat is ideal, though poultry and pork still contain some beneficial fats that will contribute to optimal health. You’re best off avoiding processed meats.
Maintaining a balanced ratio between omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids is key to healthy skin, but especially important is limiting exposure to seed oils high in omega-6 linoleic acid – commonly found in processed food and associated with various skin ailments.

Is Your Skin Missing Out on Omega-3s?

Is Your Skin Missing Out on Omega-3s?

Can Seed Oil Cause Skin Inflammation?

Seed oils are cooking and salad oils produced from seeds such as canola (rapeseed), corn, cottonseed, grapeseed, rice bran, sunflower and safflower. These contain both omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids that may help alleviate inflammation in your body.
While certain seed oils contain high concentrations of omega-6 fatty acid linoleic acid that has been linked with inflammation and heart disease, others contain more alpha-linolenic acid which acts as an omega-3 fatty acid with proven anti-inflammatory benefits that may lower inflammation risks as well as risk for chronic illness.
Most health experts agree that including small amounts of seed oils in your diet is generally safe when combined with nutritious whole foods such as fish, nuts, eggs and chia seeds. But overindulgence in omega-6 rich seed oils could contribute to inflammation-based conditions like heart disease or autoimmune diseases.
Seed oils may pose another danger: their susceptibility to oxidation. Over time, they can become rancid after sitting on a shelf or in the frying pan, potentially becoming toxic for arterial health.
To reduce oxidation, it’s best to store oil in the refrigerator and refrain from repeatedly deep frying with it. Also helpful is using foods rich in anti-inflammatory and antioxidant compounds such as leafy greens or berries in your cooking process.
There’s mounting evidence to show that modern diets tend to contain too many omega-6 fatty acids and too few omega-3s, leading to systemic inflammation and increasing the risk of chronic diseases like heart disease and cancer. This may be the source of many issues with modern food systems.
Health experts often advise consuming omega-3 fatty acids through food rather than seed oils to maximize skin benefits and prevent breakouts. Omega-3s provide essential fatty acids that protect from damage while helping prevent breakouts.
Seed oil consumption may contribute to an imbalance of omega-3 to omega-6 ratios, which could potentially cause serious issues – although such results haven’t been linked with any specific autoimmune or chronic illnesses.

Can Seed Oil Cause Skin Inflammation?

Can Seed Oil Cause Skin Inflammation?

Can Seed Oil Cause Skin Damage?

Many have heard about seed oil, a product made from various seeds such as canola, corn, sunflower, safflower, soybean, grapeseed, and cottonseed. Though it is widely used as cooking oil and in various recipes it may even contain harmful elements for your skin if overused?
Note that most seed oil purchased at supermarkets is non-toxic, as it must pass stringent quality control before being sold to customers. In fact, any trace amounts of hexane, synthetic antioxidants, trans fats, or peroxides will have been eliminated during processing.
However, there are still some dangers associated with seed oils to consider. If you use them to fry foods at high temperatures, toxic compounds could accumulate and be dangerous for your health – however this only applies if making food for large groups at once, such as in a restaurant or industrial deep fryer; otherwise it should not be cause for alarm if cooking with seed oils at home.
Problematic oils are heavily processed, which means they contain high concentrations of omega-6 fatty acids and proinflammatory fats that contribute to inflammation, leading to long-term health conditions like heart disease. This imbalance should be addressed immediately if inflammation levels are to be lowered in order to improve health outcomes.
However, it is possible to manage this by choosing healthier fats. For instance, olive oil is an excellent choice as it contains significantly fewer pro-inflammatory omega-6 fatty acids than other oils.
Avoid vegetable oils that have been hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated, as this creates trans fats; cold-pressed or expeller-pressed oils are healthier alternatives.
If you want a way to nourish your skin without adding too much fat, pomegranate seed oil might just be your answer – packed with anti-inflammatory polyunsaturated fatty acids it can help heal wounds faster, reduce scarring appearance and lessen redness caused by sun damage.

Can Seed Oil Cause Skin Damage?

Can Seed Oil Cause Skin Damage?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.