Unleashing the Power Of Seed Oils

By Tom Seest

Have You Heard Of Seed Oil?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oil by collating information and news about seed oils.

Seed oil refers to an umbrella term for various vegetable oils such as canola, soybean, corn, cottonseed, grapeseed, safflower, sunflower and rice bran oils.
Palm oil contains more polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) than other oils and is more likely to undergo oxidation–an irreversible reaction between fats and oxygen that produces harmful compounds, including free radicals.

Have You Heard Of Seed Oil?

Have You Heard Of Seed Oil?

Why Should You Care About Linoleic Acid?

Linoleic acid is one of the most prevalent polyunsaturated fats and comprises 55% of vegetable oils such as soybean, canola, safflower and corn oils. You might be surprised to learn it’s also abundantly present in eggs, chia seeds and walnuts!
Linoleic acid remains controversial as part of our diets; some argue that its consumption increases inflammation and contributes to heart disease, among other health conditions; however, recent research indicates that eating seed oils could actually lower your risk for cardiovascular disease.
Linoleic acid, more commonly referred to as ALA, is an essential fatty acid that the body cannot produce on its own. ALA helps with hormones and other chemical production that makes cells work, so ensuring you consume enough of this nutrient is critical to good skin, eyesight, and immune system health.
Linoleic acid can typically be found in whole food sources like nuts, seeds and avocados, however you can add it to your meals by using flaxseed oil or another plant-based cooking oil.
Seed oils provide the ideal source of linoleic acid. These oils contain both linoleic acid and omega-3 fatty acids.
Linoleic acid fatty acids are widely considered “good fats”, as they’re beneficial for your heart and brain health and help lower the risk of chronic illnesses like diabetes and cancer. Furthermore, anti-inflammatory properties found in this nutrient have been proven to enhance blood sugar control as well as cholesterol levels.
Safflower, canola and sunflower oils are three of the most widely consumed seed oils in the US, each offering 10-12 grams of linoleic acid per tablespoon.
These oils are packed with antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals – making them great for making anything from stir fries to date bran muffins!
Though some may express concerns over the industrial process of producing seed oils, they are produced using safe, non-toxic chemicals and subjected to rigorous quality control processes in order to eliminate potential issues. Cold-pressed nuts and seed oils offer additional nutritional advantages due to not being heated up with chemicals prior to pressing, though their costs tend to be more costly. Cold pressing leaves more nutrients intact within each drop compared to heat pressing processes which destroy them all together.

Why Should You Care About Linoleic Acid?

Why Should You Care About Linoleic Acid?

Why Should You Care About Oleic Acid?

Oleic acid is one of the essential dietary fats. Found in various food items and essential for maintaining proper metabolism and brain functioning, it also offers antioxidant protection, vitamins E and A, and monounsaturated fats, providing you with essential monounsaturates needed to decrease cholesterol levels and heart disease risks.
Seed oils are an extract made from seeds such as soybeans, canola, safflower and sunflower, which contains various forms of essential fatty acids – omega-6s and omega-3s alike.
Soybean and canola oil are two of the most frequently used seed oils in America, typically for cooking purposes and often boasting high amounts of linoleic acid (an omega-6 fat).
However, some health experts maintain that too much linoleic acid in this type of oil could be detrimental to one’s health and may contribute to inflammation within the body compared to omega-3 fatty acids. They further speculate that too much consumption could lead to obesity and chronic diseases like diabetes.
Oleic acid can be obtained through whole, organic foods like olive oil and avocados; however, you should avoid processed food that contains high concentrations of this acid, like French Fries, Onion Rings, Cookies and Candy which contain more.
To increase oleic acid consumption, it’s essential that people at high risk for chronic diseases – like cardiovascular or diabetic disease – consume foods with an ideal mix of omega-6 and omega-3 fats. This is particularly relevant if their diet includes frequent fast food consumption such as those who live in urban settings with high rates of heart disease or diabetes.
Avoid eating foods that have been exposed to repeated high heat in a pan, such as fried eggs and burgers, as this process produces polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons which have been linked with cancer risk. Home fryers generally won’t reach these temperatures; only in restaurants or industrial deep fryers may this occur.

Why Should You Care About Oleic Acid?

Why Should You Care About Oleic Acid?

What Makes Stearic Acid Essential for Your Health?

Seed oil refers to various vegetable oils produced through synthetic chemical extraction methods that often involve further processes like bleaching and deodorizing.
Seed oils contain fats rich in saturated fatty acids that raise cholesterol levels and increase your risk for chronic disease. Stearic acid stands out among saturated fatty acids for having the least impactful result on cholesterol, making it an excellent way to improve heart health or reduce risks related to cardiovascular illness.
Stearic acid not only lowers cholesterol, but can also prevent the production of pro-inflammatory compounds that lead to heart disease and other illnesses. Furthermore, its anti-aging properties may prove helpful for those looking for ways to look younger.
Although stearic acid is considered a healthy fat, it should only be consumed in moderation. A 2000-calorie diet requires two tablespoons of oil daily; extra virgin olive oil or seeds containing omega-3 fats provide more nutritional benefits.
Repeatedly heating seed oils to high temperatures is known to lead to the formation of potentially hazardous compounds. This is especially important if commercial deep fryers are used in restaurants.
Cold-pressed or expeller pressed oils tend to be healthier choices because their production requires no chemical solvents that could potentially be toxic for your health.
Remember to keep this in mind: most saturated fatty acids increase LDL (the “bad”) cholesterol in your blood, though palmitic acid has less of an effect. Stearic acid has less of an impact than palmitic acid as a form of saturated fat.
However, stearic acid does not provide all of the same advantages that unsaturated fats do; in particular, oleic acid or omega-3 fatty acids offer greater protection. Their protective qualities reduce heart disease risks. Furthermore, saturated fats increase inflammation levels, which increases your chances of developing diabetes and other conditions.

What Makes Stearic Acid Essential for Your Health?

What Makes Stearic Acid Essential for Your Health?

Why Should You Care About Linolenic Acid?

People consume seed oil for various reasons, but it’s also crucial to recognize its nutritional benefits. Seed oil contains essential monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs and PUFAs). These essential fatty acids support healthy living.
Linoleic acid can be found in soybean, corn and cottonseed oils as well as many other food sources; examples include grass-fed meat, milk cheese and eggs as good sources.
Linoleic acid, an omega-6 fatty acid, can be beneficial to your health in several ways. It helps keep inflammation under control while decreasing heart disease risk. Furthermore, eating foods rich in linolenic acid will assist with weight management.
Olive oil is an excellent source of linolenic acid; however, when cooking with vegetable oils that have been processed using heat or chemicals this process can strip away many vital nutrients while simultaneously increasing costs.
Other sources of linolenic acid include walnuts, hazelnuts and macadamia nuts; you can also find it in some vegetable oils such as canola and corn oil.
Linolenic acid consumption may raise concerns, but research has demonstrated that this polyunsaturated fat does not pose any significant threat to heart disease or cancer in humans. Furthermore, linolenic acid can help lower cholesterol and protect against certain inflammatory conditions like arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and asthma.
Cooking with seed oils poses the threat of degrading or becoming rancid at high temperatures. This may happen through either heating them in restaurants, or reheating for home use – either way it should be taken seriously as an issue that you should keep an eye on.
However, there are ways to overcome this dilemma. One solution is cold-pressed oils – though more costly, these produce oils without heat or chemicals during production and may have healthier composition than their heated counterparts.
Other strategies include limiting intake of saturated and trans fats as well as ultra-processed foods containing vegetable or seed oils – this way you can ensure that your body receives enough of the healthy types of fats necessary for optimal health.

Why Should You Care About Linolenic Acid?

Why Should You Care About Linolenic Acid?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.