Uncovering the Ancient History Of Grapeseed Oil

By Tom Seest

How Long Has Grapeseed Oil Been Around?

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Grapeseed oil is a multitasker. It moisturizes, lightens dark circles, reduces scars, and tightens pores while healing acne, dandruff, and sun damage. Grapeseed contains polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) as well as small amounts of Vitamin E; though an imbalance of this may contribute to heart disease, balance is key.
Check for non-hydrogenated grapeseed oil; this indicates it wasn’t subjected to high temperatures during production that may change its fatty acid profile and compromise its integrity.

How Long Has Grapeseed Oil Been Around?

How Long Has Grapeseed Oil Been Around?

Uncovering the Ancient Origins of Grapeseed Oil

Since ancient times, grape plants (Vitis vinifera) have been utilized for various purposes. From building structures with its vines to using its leaves for weaving hats and shirts with intricate weave patterns, to eating its fruit with raisins for snacks to using its seeds to press their oil for medicinal use or pressing for its oil as cooking oil – its usage as such has gained momentum due to its high levels of vitamin E and polyunsaturated fats content.
Grapeseed oil is an unwitting by-product of winemaking. After grapes have been crushed into juice to ferment into wine, large numbers of seeds remain. Although often discarded as waste material, these seeds contain high concentrations of nutritious oils which can be extracted using cold-pressing or solvent extraction; latter involves using organic solvents like hexane to separate oils from seeds.
Chefs often prefer grape seed oil because of its neutral flavor profile, allowing other ingredients to shine in any given dish. Plus, its very high smoke point allows high heat cooking methods such as sauteing and stir frying without burning or producing toxic byproducts like free radicals; and marinades feature it because its flavors do not interfere with other components.
Grapeseed oil has long been promoted as a health food due to its ability to lower cholesterol. Packed with omega-3 fatty acids that have been shown to decrease LDL (“bad”) cholesterol while increasing HDL (“good”) levels in the body – associated with lower risks of cardiovascular disease and diabetes.
Oil of Oregano has long been recognized for its cosmetic and medicinal uses, from treating scars and stretch marks to its effectiveness in treating acne, psoriasis, and dermatitis. Furthermore, some believe that oregano’s anti-aging benefits include reducing fine lines and wrinkles as well as keeping skin hydrated.
Although grapeseed oil as a cooking medium is relatively new, there are numerous other reasons to include it in your diet. Due to its subtle flavor, grapeseed oil makes an ideal salad dressing ingredient and also makes for great roasting vegetables or marinating meat!
Be mindful that grapeseed oil, like any form of fat, should only be consumed in moderation and should never exceed recommended intake amounts, as this could increase your risk for obesity and related health concerns.
Ancient Europeans used grapes as medicine, using their leaves, fruit, and seeds to formulate soothing eye and skin treatments and relieve symptoms of illness such as constipation. Unripe grapes could even stop bleeding and heal wounds! Historically speaking, grapes were first cultivated 6,000 years ago in Georgia, which is situated between Eastern Europe and West Asia. Today, grapes are grown all over the world for both wine production and medical uses. The oldest evidence of grape cultivation dates back 6000 years in Georgia alone!

Uncovering the Ancient Origins of Grapeseed Oil

Uncovering the Ancient Origins of Grapeseed Oil

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