The Ancient History Of Seed Oils

By Tom Seest

How Long Have Seed Oils Existed?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oils by collating information and news about seed oils.

Seed oils are made up of cooking fats derived from the seeds of plants like soybean, canola, and grapeseed, which are extracted as cooking fats for use in high-heat cooking methods such as frying. These oils are often utilized as part of their recipe for making delicious dishes like burgers and other delicacies.
Health and nutrition experts have increasingly spoken out against the use of cooking oils containing trans fatty acids, some even alleging they are toxic, as they have been linked to numerous health concerns.

How Long Have Seed Oils Existed?

How Long Have Seed Oils Existed?

Where Did Seed Oils Come From?

Seed oils are vegetable oils derived from various seeds, such as sunflower, canola, peanut, safflower, and corn oil. Often, these types of oils are used both at home and in industrial food manufacturing facilities.
Though seed oils are generally safe when consumed in moderation, large-scale use in processed food products can be problematic. Omega-6 fatty acids found in seed oils are known to contribute to inflammation within the body as well as lead to obesity, heart disease, and diabetes, among other health concerns.
Many of the seed oils we consume in our diets are highly refined and bleached, rendering them less healthy than their natural, unrefined counterparts. This is particularly true of industrial seed oils derived from soybeans, corn, cottonseed (rapeseed is the source of canola oil), or safflower.
Industrial seed oils are extracted by heating them at very high temperatures, which causes unsaturated fatty acids in the seeds to oxidize, thus increasing the amount of oil that can be extracted.
Oil extracted from seeds is then extracted using a petroleum-based solvent such as hexane in order to maximize production from seeds.
During this process, oils are also deodorized and bleached to eliminate any off-putting aromas while making industrial seed oils look better.
This processing step may leave toxic residues behind that are harmful to our health, while deodorization and bleaching processes may produce oils with harmful trans fats.
Seed oils may also contribute to an imbalance of our fatty acid ratio, with too much omega-6 compared with omega-3 fatty acids being consumed in our bodies and leading to inflammation, chronic illness, and disease.
At present, it is feasible to eliminate seed oils completely from your diet and switch over to more natural sources of oils like coconut or avocado oil in order to ensure you are consuming sufficient fatty acids as part of a well-rounded diet.

Where Did Seed Oils Come From?

Where Did Seed Oils Come From?

What Are the Benefits of Seed Oils?

Seed oils are derived from seeds such as canola, cottonseed, soybean, corn, grapeseed, and rapeseed. These oils are often used as cooking and salad oils and as ingredients in foods like nut butter, sauces, and baked goods.
Seeds are used to produce vegetable oils due to the high concentrations of linolenic acid found within them, which have antibacterial properties and help protect against heart disease.
Fatty acids have anti-inflammatory benefits and may even decrease cancer risks; however, their increased prevalence has some health experts concerned for human well-being.
Seed oils are commonly used as cooking ingredients, but they also have several other uses ranging from shortening and flavor base applications to being an omega-3-rich source. Safflower oil, for instance, is often employed as shortening in pastries while providing valuable omega-3 benefits.
Soybean oil is an increasingly popular shortening and flavor-based option, thanks to its abundance of omega-3s and EPA, which help combat inflammation while possibly decreasing risk factors associated with chronic conditions like heart disease and diabetes.
But for optimal health benefits, opt for cold-pressed or expeller-pressed oils that contain more essential vitamins and nutrients than other seed oils.
Industrial processes for producing these oils involve heating the seeds and using chemical extraction methods designed to maximize oil extraction. Heat causes unsaturated fatty acids found in these seeds to oxidize, leading to potentially hazardous byproducts.
Cold-pressed or expeller-pressed oils provide better benefits. Since refined and bleached versions can sometimes damage fatty acid structures in these oils, cold-pressed or expeller-pressed versions might be best.
Next, seed oils are deodorized using chemicals. This produces trans fats known to be detrimental to heart health. Finally, industrial seed oils are colored using additional chemicals in order to enhance their appearance.
Industrial seed oils are an integral component of modern diets and can be found everywhere, from chips and crackers to shampoo and toothpaste. Unfortunately, however, too much exposure to industrial seed oils has been linked with obesity and other related conditions, so it is essential that we are aware of their dangers when consumed in excess.

What Are the Benefits of Seed Oils?

What Are the Benefits of Seed Oils?

Are Seed Oils Safe for Consumption?

Since 2008, seed oils have caused much confusion regarding their health benefits. Many social media influencers make false or misleading claims regarding these oils, making it hard to know what claims are true or not.
First and foremost, how oils are processed poses an enormous problem. Seeds such as soy, corn, cotton, safflower, and rapeseed are heated at very high temperatures, which oxidize unsaturated fatty acids that could otherwise remain unsaturated, producing harmful byproducts that enter our bodies in the form of energy-dense yet nutrient-poor oils that we take in through our diet.
Second, industrial seed oil manufacturers utilize a petroleum-based solvent to extract oil from seeds. Unfortunately, this leaves an unpleasant odor behind as well as producing trans fats known to be hazardous to heart health. Furthermore, additional chemicals are added to improve the color of industrial seed oils.
Thirdly, omega-6 polyunsaturated fats found in these oils may promote inflammation. This imbalance increases your risk for chronic diseases like cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes.
Fourthly, seed oils contain chemicals linked to cancer and other serious health issues, such as TBHQ, BHA, and BHT – banned substances by Japan, Europe, Canada, and Australia that have the potential to cause cancerous tumors as well as serious illnesses if consumed regularly in large amounts.
Fifthly, these oils can quickly turn rancid. Their high levels of oxidative stress increase your risk for chronic diseases like cancer, diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, cardiovascular disease, cataracts, asthma, arthritis and Alzheimer’s.
At the core, one of the best things you can do for your health is avoid all refined oils that are produced using heat and chemical extraction processes. Opting instead for cold-pressed oils – while more expensive, they still deliver essential health benefits without additional chemicals or oxidation damage.

Are Seed Oils Safe for Consumption?

Are Seed Oils Safe for Consumption?

What Benefits Does Refined Seed Oil Offer?

Seed oils are composed of various vegetable-based fats, including canola, soybean, corn, cottonseed, grapeseed, safflower, sunflower, and peanut oils. All these types are extracted using synthetic chemical extraction methods as well as additional processing steps such as bleaching and deodorizing to create seed oils.
Commercially fried foods contain chemicals that can be detrimental to our health, while repeated heating of oil to high temperatures – commonly seen in restaurant deep fryers – is also dangerous for our well-being.
As such, consuming too many seed oils is detrimental to health, particularly if trying to lose weight, as this deprives your body of vital vitamins and nutrients.
Although eating whole food sources of omega-3 fatty acids has its own set of advantages, the greatest is likely anti-inflammatory benefits – something which can help prevent chronic diseases like arthritis.
Omega-3 fatty acids may actually help lower your blood pressure by helping to reduce inflammation and promote cardiovascular health.
Seed oils contain small amounts of inflammatory fats (trans fats and oxidized fats). However, experts generally agree that their concentration isn’t enough to cause harm. Furthermore, these relatively inexpensive oils can replace other nutritious options like avocado or olive oil for more beneficial nutrient absorption.
Though these oils may seem invulnerable to oxidation, it’s essential to remember they can still become vulnerable due to exposure to oxygen and heat during refinement or storage at room temperature – particularly for polyunsaturated fats like omega-6s.
As such, it’s best to limit seed oil intake and focus on other healthy fats instead. That means choosing unrefined oils and maintaining a diet rich in whole foods.
Start off right by investing in high-quality cold-pressed oils made without chemicals or heat, such as olive and coconut oils. Cold-pressed oils contain heart-healthy monounsaturated fats while being low in omega-6s, the primary fatty acid found in industrial seed oils.
Focusing on consuming plenty of whole fruits and vegetables rich in antioxidants will also help neutralize free radicals that contribute to disease.

What Benefits Does Refined Seed Oil Offer?

What Benefits Does Refined Seed Oil Offer?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.