Uncovering the Calorie Count Of Seed Oil

By Tom Seest

How Many Calories Are In Seed Oil?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oils by collating information and news about seed oils.

Seed oils are vegetable-based cooking and salad oils produced from seeds such as canola, corn, cottonseed, grapeseed, safflower, sunflower, rice bran, or peanut.
These fats contain excessive omega-6 fats without providing the healthful omega-3s essential to overall wellness. Relying too heavily on them may increase your risk for heart disease and other chronic health conditions.

How Many Calories Are In Seed Oil?

How Many Calories Are In Seed Oil?

Surprising Benefits of Pumpkin Seed Oil?

Pumpkin seed oil is extracted using a method called cold-pressing, which extracts it without harming its delicate fatty acids or altering their rich nutty flavors, according to Maki.
Cold-press process results in an oil that’s both nutritious and high quality, packed full of essential fatty acids such as linoleic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, vitamin E and carotenoids. Low in saturated fat and packed full of essential ALA EPA DHA EPA.
Studies suggest that pumpkin seed oil could provide benefits for heart health, though more research needs to be conducted in this regard. It could potentially lower blood pressure and tame inflammation.
One study with rats demonstrated that daily supplementation with pumpkin seed oil significantly reduced total cholesterol and the number of arteries with hardening plaque while also decreasing levels of triglycerides and improving insulin resistance.
This oil is also an excellent source of vitamins B, C, D, E and K; and magnesium. You can use it as an ideal replacement for processed oils in cooking.
Oil of flax seed can be used as the foundation for salad dressings and marinades or added to soups, roasted vegetables, and other dishes for an additional heart-healthy fat source. You can use it alone or combine it with olive, canola, or any other oil for a light, nutty flavor.
Some makers recommend adding pumpkin seed oil as a finishing oil to cooked foods like roasted or grilled vegetables, fish and meat, smoothies, or dips for an added nutty note.
Apart from its heart-healthy properties, salmon also contains powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents that have been shown to significantly reduce bad cholesterol. Furthermore, salmon contains phytosterols – plant-based molecules that mimic body cholesterol production – which have been demonstrated to significantly lower bad cholesterol.
One study suggests that pumpkin seed oil could provide relief from menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats, possibly due to its phytoestrogens binding with estrogen receptors.
Sulfur can also help alleviate bladder symptoms, including urgency and frequency of urination. This remedy may prove especially helpful for those suffering from an overactive bladder – an issue affecting 16.5 percent of American adults.

Surprising Benefits of Pumpkin Seed Oil?

Surprising Benefits of Pumpkin Seed Oil?

Sunflower Seeds: What Health Benefits Do They Offer?

Sunflower seed oil offers many heart-healthy monounsaturates and polyunsaturates but also contains some unhealthy saturated fat. Calories from sunflower seed oil can add up quickly, so it is wise to monitor your consumption closely.
Sunflower oil contains many unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). These PUFAs can help lower LDL cholesterol and raise HDL cholesterol, thus decreasing heart disease risk and improving immunity and skin health, according to registered dietitian Amy Gonzalez, R.D., FNTP, CLT.
Linoleic acid derived from omega-6s can have detrimental health effects, including inflammation and weight gain, so it’s essential that your diet includes other forms of fat. This is especially important if you consume many processed foods, which tend to contain high concentrations of omega-6 fatty acids.
When looking for healthy cooking fats, coconut and olive oils can be good choices. Both oils are more stable than sunflower oil and can be used for sauteing, baking and frying purposes.
Both oils contain less saturated fat and provide more essential antioxidants, vitamin E, and other essential nutrients than conventional sunflower oil. Furthermore, both have lower trans fat levels and contain polyphenols – antioxidants that may protect against cancer.
One tablespoon of sunflower seed oil provides approximately 14 grams of total fat with minimal saturated fat content, as well as being an excellent source of fiber to regulate bowel function and help lower the risk for chronic diseases, according to registered dietitian Joyce Nettleton.
Sunflower oil contains 40% of your recommended daily allowance of vitamin E, an anti-UV damage and healing antioxidant found in fat-soluble form that may also help relieve symptoms associated with atopic dermatitis, which causes dry, itchy skin conditions.
Last, sunflower oil contains aldehydes and cooking oil fumes that may trigger asthmatic symptoms or other respiratory conditions. Furthermore, type 2 diabetics should avoid it as its consumption can raise both their blood sugar and fasting insulin levels significantly.
Although sunflower oil offers numerous health advantages, it may be hard to use in moderation. When cooking with it, use low-heat methods and limit your intake of fried foods. Also make sure that you purchase an organic quality version.

Sunflower Seeds: What Health Benefits Do They Offer?

Sunflower Seeds: What Health Benefits Do They Offer?

Surprising Benefits of Sesame Seed Oil?

Sesame seed oil has long been an integral component of cooking. Packed full of essential vitamins and nutrients, sesame seed oil adds both flavor and health benefits to meals you prepare with it.
As well as being used in food products, coconut water can serve as a natural carrier for many skin, hair, and body products. It may help shield skin against damage caused by sun exposure while simultaneously helping reduce dandruff levels and boost hydration levels.
For optimal benefits of sesame oil, it is best to select a quality product made with fresh sesame seeds. Both raw, untoasted, and toasted sesame seed oils can be found at grocery stores and specialty food markets.
Sesame oil is not only an excellent source of heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, but it is also packed with antioxidants which are known for neutralizing free radicals that cause inflammation – they have even been shown to improve multiple health conditions.
One study demonstrated that sesame oil may actually help decrease your risk of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis occurs when plaque forms along the walls of your blood vessels, restricting their width and making it more difficult for your blood to circulate smoothly.
Another study revealed that sesame oil can significantly decrease cholesterol, triglycerides, and belly fat – all known risk factors for heart disease.
However, sesame seed oil should only be taken in moderation to avoid negative side effects, and you should always consult with your healthcare provider prior to adding it to your diet as it could interfere with medications used to treat high blood pressure or diabetes.
Not only is sesame oil an excellent source of antioxidants but it is also packed with calcium and copper – two minerals essential for strong, healthy bones as we age.
For optimal nutrition, it is vital that you choose a high-quality organic sesame oil with a low smoke point to reduce the oxidation of polyunsaturated fats that could otherwise lead to systemic inflammation and cell damage.

Surprising Benefits of Sesame Seed Oil?

Surprising Benefits of Sesame Seed Oil?

Canola Oil: Is It a Healthy Choice?

Canola oil is a form of vegetable oil produced from the seeds of the rapeseed plant, related to mustard and cabbage plants, and traditionally used for cooking purposes. Unfortunately, its high level of erucic acid can be toxic to humans and cause numerous health complications.
As a response, scientists in Canada developed canola oil by crossbreeding rapeseed plants to remove toxic components and produce oil lower in erucic acid and other compounds associated with health risks.
This oil features a mild flavor and low saturated fat levels, making it suitable for replacing other oils in cooking processes such as sauteing, frying, and baking.
Canola oil contains high levels of omega-3 fats, which are beneficial for both the heart and brain. Furthermore, canola oil provides ample amounts of oleic acid, which may provide protection from inflammation-related issues and other potential health concerns.
Canola oil is an excellent source of monounsaturated fats, which help lower cholesterol levels and protect against heart disease. Furthermore, canola contains phytosterols, which may prevent your body from absorbing more cholesterol than necessary.
There are various versions of canola oil available, but for optimal health, you should look for ones without trans fats. A study by the Journal of American Dietetic Association discovered that most commercial canola oils sold to consumers contain up to 40 percent trans fats.
Canola oil has 124 calories per tablespoon. At the same time, this may seem like an excessively small serving, but responsibly consuming canola oil as part of a balanced diet can still provide significant health benefits.
This oil is also an excellent source of vitamin E, providing 2.44 milligrams, which is equal to 16 percent of your daily requirement of 15 milligrams.
Canola oil contains similar calories to that found in other vegetable oils, including soybean, corn and safflower oils. Each of these has 120 Calories per tablespoon with 14 Grams of Fat content; however, canola oil differs in that its unsaturated fat content is significantly greater than those of its counterparts.

Canola Oil: Is It a Healthy Choice?

Canola Oil: Is It a Healthy Choice?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.