Discover the Truth About Black Seed Oil’s Effects on Blood Thickness.

By Tom Seest

Is Black Seed Oil Blood-Thinning?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oil by collating information and news about seed oils.

Black seed oil, extracted from the seeds of Nigella sativa plants, has long been used as an effective natural remedy to treat various ailments and health conditions. For centuries it has been relied upon for help.
Research suggests that it may aid with weight loss, hair growth and acne; however, more studies need to be conducted in order to fully appreciate its potential.

Is Black Seed Oil Blood-Thinning?

Is Black Seed Oil Blood-Thinning?

Is Thymoquinone in Black Seed Oil a Blood-thinning Agent?

Black seed oil is a supplement produced from the seeds of an ancient plant called Nigella sativa. People have used this supplement for thousands of years as a treatment option for various health ailments caused by Nigella sativa’s tiny black seeds.
People often believe that black seed oil has many health advantages, including anti-inflammatory and tumor-reducing properties thanks to its high thymoquinone content.
Scientists have recently found that thymoquinone can effectively prevent certain cancer cells in animal studies, including leukemia, breast, and brain tumors by inducing apoptosis (programmed cell death). A Croatian study demonstrated this potential.
Thymoquinone’s ability to reduce inflammation in the body is another notable benefit, as chronic inflammation has been linked with many health issues like heart disease, cancer and diabetes.
Studies have also demonstrated the efficacy of black seed oil to manage blood sugar levels, helping lower fasting levels and control long-term glucose in the blood, potentially decreasing symptoms associated with type 2 diabetes.
Though these studies are encouraging, more research needs to be done before their results can be confirmed in humans. If you are contemplating taking black seed oil supplements as medicine, be sure to speak to a medical provider first before making your decision.
Some supplements containing black seed oil may cause adverse gastrointestinal side effects, including gas, bloating or diarrhea. This is because their high thymoquinone content affects how the body digests fats. Opting for one with lower thymoquinone content – for instance, one that contains higher levels of free fatty acid content – could lessen these side effects and make absorbing nutrients from food easier for your body.
Black seed oil may cause blood pressure drops and fatigue; therefore, it is recommended that you consult with a healthcare provider prior to beginning use. This is especially relevant if taking medications that could alter your blood pressure levels.
If you’re considering trying black seed oil for the first time, make sure that it meets high-quality and therapeutic-grade criteria such as 100% pure and certified organic for optimal effectiveness and potency. This way you’ll ensure you receive a supplement with maximum benefits.

Is Thymoquinone in Black Seed Oil a Blood-thinning Agent?

Is Thymoquinone in Black Seed Oil a Blood-thinning Agent?

Is Black Seed Oil a Natural Blood Thinner?

Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are an integral part of our diets and can be found in food sources such as fish, seeds, nuts, and plant-based oils. PUFAS have many health advantages that are particularly helpful to heart health.
These supplements can help lower LDL cholesterol levels and may decrease your risk of heart disease or stroke, reduce inflammation and enhance the heart’s ability to absorb fat-soluble vitamins such as Vitamin E.
Polyunsaturated fats also help regulate your thyroid hormone levels, which in turn impacts your mood and energy level. Furthermore, they help control blood sugar levels to avoid diabetes altogether.
These fats can be an excellent healthy alternative to saturated and trans fats; however, you should be wary that they contain nine calories per gram compared to four for carbohydrates and proteins.
Omega-3 fatty acids and omega-6 fatty acids are two forms of polyunsaturated fatty acids commonly consumed. Both essential fats – meaning your body cannot produce them itself – must come from food sources to meet their daily requirements.
Though PUFAs provide many health advantages, some forms may also be detrimental. Trans fats in particular should be avoided as they increase your bad cholesterol levels and raise the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, and stroke. Instead, make an effort to incorporate monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats into your diet to keep your heart healthy.
As fats can contribute to weight gain and obesity, it’s recommended to limit daily fat consumption to no more than 25%-30% of your total caloric intake – this includes red meat, butter, cheese and whole-fat dairy products.
Your diet should include unsaturated fats (such as those found in vegetable oils) in addition to saturated fats, while also avoiding trans fats which have been shown to raise bad cholesterol and triglyceride levels.
Eat foods rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as nuts, seeds and fish. You can also find these fats in vegetable oils like soybean and canola oil.

Is Black Seed Oil a Natural Blood Thinner?

Is Black Seed Oil a Natural Blood Thinner?

What Are the Benefits of Black Seed Oil?

Antioxidants are substances that help defend your body against the detrimental effects of unstable molecules known as free radicals, which play an essential part of metabolism but when produced in excess quantities and high concentrations can damage cells and tissues.
For optimal antioxidant nutrition, it’s essential to eat a variety of food rich in these micronutrients – fruits and vegetables being the prime sources, but other dietary supplements also contain them.
Some dietary supplements may help protect against diseases like cancer, heart disease and dementia; however, these should never replace a nutritious diet in any way.
Diet is the key to getting enough antioxidants. A varied and plant-based diet with fruits, vegetables and berries as the cornerstone will offer maximum protection.
Keep in mind that antioxidants work synergistically with one another and other bioactive compounds to promote health and prevent disease. Too much of any one antioxidant could result in adverse reactions; to avoid this possibility it’s essential to consume a varied diet with foods with specific functions that all work in concert together.
Lycopene, an antioxidant found in tomatoes, gives them their red hue. When heated-treated tomatoes are consumed, however, more bioavailable lycopene becomes easier for our bodies to absorb.
These days, many people rely on antioxidant supplements as part of their nutritional regimen. Such supplements offer convenient ways to receive their benefits without eating various food sources separately.
But if you want to increase your antioxidant consumption, black seed oil may offer healing properties. Packed with thymoquinone – known for supporting brain and liver function as well as joint health and cardiovascular wellness – black seed oil offers plenty of extra support.
Black seed oil also offers another distinct benefit – helping reduce inflammation in your body and thus, lessen pain from arthritis and discomfort caused by it.

What Are the Benefits of Black Seed Oil?

What Are the Benefits of Black Seed Oil?

How Does Black Seed Oil Combat Inflammation?

Black seed oil derived from Nigella sativa seeds contains anti-inflammatory properties which may provide relief for many conditions, including heart disease, obesity, cancer, infections and hair loss.
Black seed oil’s anti-inflammatory benefits come from its rich source of thymoquinone, which has been shown to decrease inflammation throughout the body. C-reactive protein levels and malondialdehyde levels, two markers of inflammation in bloodstream, have both been reduced thanks to this compound.
black seed oil may help lower triglyceride levels in your blood, which are fats derived from food that increase risk for heart disease. A 2015 study showed participants who took 3 grams daily of black seed oil for 12 weeks experienced significant reduction in their LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels.
Studies have also indicated that black seed oil can aid those suffering from RA, an autoimmune disorder that causes joint swelling and pain. Simply taking five doses a week of black seed oil helped lower inflammation in joints and alleviate pain and stiffness associated with joint arthritis.
However, if you suffer from chronic inflammation (like arthritis) or are taking medications to manage it, it’s advisable to speak to your physician first about taking supplements containing omega-3 fatty acids or polyunsaturated fats as these may increase inflammation if taken with certain medicines or conditions.
Avoid black seed oil if you suffer from bleeding disorders or take medications that affect blood clotting, like Heparin (for treating Hepatitis C) and Warfarin (used to treat deep vein thrombosis). Black seed oil could further slow clotting time, increasing your risk of bleeding.
If you have diabetes, black seed oil could help decrease your blood sugar by decreasing insulin resistance and improving fasting glucose and A1c levels (which measure average blood sugar over time). Furthermore, black seed oil could also lower triglyceride levels – another form of fat which increases risk for cardiovascular disease and stroke – and possibly also help decrease levels of triglycerides (another form of fatty material found in blood), potentially decreasing their impact.
Due to its wide-ranging effects, black seed oil should only be taken after consulting with your healthcare provider and taking proper precautions. Pregnant women and those breastfeeding should ideally not consume black seed oil supplements while on this course as well as those who have kidney disease should avoid taking black seed oil altogether.

How Does Black Seed Oil Combat Inflammation?

How Does Black Seed Oil Combat Inflammation?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.