Discover the Skin Benefits Of Seed Oil

By Tom Seest

Is Seed Oil Good Or Bad for Your Skin?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oils by collating information and news about seed oils.

Seed oils are refined vegetable-based oils derived from canola (rapeseed), corn, cottonseed, grapeseed, safflower, soybean, and sunflower.
These oils are highly refined and nutritionally devoid, often featuring unwanted components from refining processes as well as oxidized fats.

Is Seed Oil Good Or Bad for Your Skin?

Is Seed Oil Good Or Bad for Your Skin?

How Does Seed Oil Impact Inflammation?

Seed oils being bad for the skin is a popular social media myth that has often been coupled with aspects of paleo diets, clean eating, and conspiracy theories – yet research does not support such claims.
One of the primary concerns surrounding seed oil is that it may increase inflammation in their bodies, as this has been linked with various chronic conditions like heart disease, cancer, and diabetes.
There is no clear evidence linking seed oils with inflammation; on the contrary, they could even reduce your risk by providing essential omega-3 and omega-6 fats that have numerous health benefits.
If you want to include more seed oil in your diet, extra virgin olive or coconut oils are better choices as they provide many of the same health benefits as other vegetable oils without being overly processed like most seed oils are.
Seed oils pose another significant problem to health: over time, they oxidize in your cupboard or frying pan, leading to rancidity that’s potentially hazardous to both of you. That’s because their omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) can become vulnerable to oxidation when exposed to oxygen or heat, potentially harming their integrity and yours.
These polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) can also be reheated in your oven, leading to the release of harmful chemicals that increase inflammation. This is particularly true if you cook using high-temperature cooking liquids like canola, sunflower, or soybean oils.
But these essential fatty acids must be consumed in moderation in order to remain essential components of our healthful metabolisms. Unfortunately, modern diets tend to contain an excess of omega-6 versus omega-3 fats that increase the risk for chronic illnesses like heart disease and cancer.
Diet is key when it comes to managing inflammation, so making smart dietary choices such as eating plenty of nutrient-rich vegetables and fruits, along with whole grains and healthy protein sources, will do wonders in helping improve both gut and mental health. You’ll feel much better after cutting back on ultra-processed and fast foods as well.

How Does Seed Oil Impact Inflammation?

How Does Seed Oil Impact Inflammation?

Are Sunburns Linked to Seed Oil Use?

Sun damage from ultraviolet (UV) rays is well-documented and may even contribute to skin cancer, so to safeguard yourself against its damaging rays, it is wise to limit sun exposure as much as possible.
Apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen containing SPF 15 or higher as soon as you step outside to protect your skin from both UVA and UVB rays that can lead to sunburn, premature aging, and skin cancer.
Before venturing out in the sun, be sure to apply sunscreen liberally on your face, neck, and hands – this will lower your risk of sunburn while helping protect against wrinkles.
No matter what age or skin type, everyone should try their best to minimize sun exposure as much as possible – this includes staying out of tanning beds and staying under cover as much as possible.
Remember to inform yourself if you are taking medications such as acne medication, antidepressants, diuretics, heart drugs, or birth control pills that increase sun sensitivity – such as antidepressants. Discuss this matter with your physician if these affect you adversely.
Too much sun exposure can result in many other health conditions, including polymorphous light eruption (PMLE). PMLE is a skin reaction caused when exposed to intense sunlight, which you are not used to.
Heat stroke, an extreme condition that can even result in death, causes you to become dehydrated, feeling weak, fatigued, or nauseous.
Too much sun exposure can also result in solar keratosis, which appears as rough, scaly patches on your skin and has the potential to turn into skin cancer. Although they can form anywhere on your body, most commonly, they appear on your head, face, neck, and hands.
Sunlight can cause significant damage to the skin. Luckily, natural products like sunflower seed oil provide natural solutions to keep it hydrated and healthy.

Are Sunburns Linked to Seed Oil Use?

Are Sunburns Linked to Seed Oil Use?

Gut Health: Does Seed Oil Impact It?

Seed oils offer an ideal replacement for olive and coconut oils in culinary applications yet contain potentially unhealthy fatty acids – including trans and oxidized fatty acids, which have been linked to inflammation.
Matthew Bechtold, MD, a gastroenterologist from the University of Missouri, warns that seed oils, like chips, French fries, cookies, and candy, can cause digestive issues when consumed through processed food products containing seed oils.
Bechtold cautions that eating processed food increases your risk for chronic diseases and inflammation in the gut, including Crohn’s disease. Therefore, for optimal gut health, it is best to consume whole foods instead of processed ones, says Bechtold.
Doebrich points out that when seed oils are heated at high temperatures for extended periods, they can transform into trans fats and other “bad” fats – this may not be an issue in home kitchens. Still, it could become problematic in commercial settings.
If you do decide to consume seed oils, be aware that they contain high concentrations of polyunsaturated fats, which are essential for proper body functioning; however, excessive consumption could lead to inflammation and other health complications.
One type of omega-6 fatty acid found in seed oils, known as linoleic acid, may contribute to chronic inflammation, setting off numerous health problems and raising your risk for cardiovascular disease and cancer while simultaneously increasing your blood pressure.
Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), another polyunsaturated fatty acid found in seed oils, can help lower cholesterol and decrease your risk for heart disease, diabetes, and other ailments. You can find GLA in olive oil, flaxseed oil, and hemp seeds.
Seed oils can be consumed safely when taken in moderation as part of an overall balanced diet that includes plenty of fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, and whole grains. They provide essential fatty acids like omega-3 and omega-6 that can provide essential dietary benefits; however, they should be avoided by those suffering from certain medical conditions or taking certain medications.

Gut Health: Does Seed Oil Impact It?

Gut Health: Does Seed Oil Impact It?

Does Seed Oil Cause Weight Gain?

Oils are plant-derived fats that fall into two major categories: saturated and unsaturated. Saturated fats include animal sources like butter and lard; unsaturated ones can come from plant sources like olive or coconut oils.
Some health experts are highly critical of seed oils. According to these critics, seed oils contain too many omega-6 fatty acids – specifically linoleic acid – which have been implicated as contributors of inflammation-causing compounds.
Recent research indicates otherwise; according to one recent study, eating more than 2 grams of linoleic acid per day does not lead to inflammation or chronic disease; rather, researchers found that seed oils provide healthy fats when consumed in appropriate quantities.
If the potential weight gain associated with seed oil use concerns you, there are steps you can take to manage it. Consult with a healthcare provider who will help identify current diet practices and propose tailored plans.
One way to avoid weight gain is to limit your consumption of ultra-processed foods, which often contain refined carbohydrates, sodium, and sugar.
Weight gain can be a serious health risk. To protect yourself from this situation and its subsequent side effects, consume more whole, nutrient-rich foods while cutting back or outright eliminating processed and ultra-processed snacks from your diet altogether.
Add more antioxidants, including black seed oil, to your diet for maximum benefit. Antioxidants are important nutrients that can protect cells against damage from free radicals; one 2015 study involving participants with type 2 diabetes who took 3 grams of black seed oil daily for 12 weeks saw significant decreases in both LDL cholesterol and triglycerides levels.
Seed oils should also be used sparingly when cooking at home. Nutritionists generally advise their clients to incorporate seed oils once or twice each week into their menus; you can use these oils to rehydrate blanched veggies after blanching or coat them before baking.

Does Seed Oil Cause Weight Gain?

Does Seed Oil Cause Weight Gain?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.