Unleashing the Potential Of Seed Oil

By Tom Seest

What Are Seed Oils Used For?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oils by collating information and news about seed oils.

Seed oils are a go-to ingredient in cooking and salad topping, featuring healthy monounsaturates and polyunsaturates – yet can sometimes get an unfavorable reputation – leading to one popular health influencer labeling them the “Hateful Eight.”
She claims they contribute to everything from leaky gut to cardiovascular disease – but is this really the case?

What Are Seed Oils Used For?

What Are Seed Oils Used For?

Are Seed Oils the Healthy Fat Alternative?

Seed oils are cooking and salad oils made from seeds that have been processed, making up the largest share of fats in the average American diet. Examples include canola, linseed, sesame, sunflower, and safflower oils – each high in omega-6 fatty acids that may contribute to inflammation; some researchers even suggest an imbalance of omega-6 to omega-3 ratio could lead to numerous diseases, including heart disease and obesity – although such studies were mostly performed using rodent models and little evidence exists suggesting a connection with high intakes of seed oils causing such effects on people.
Some individuals also believe that seed oils contain harmful chemicals such as hexane and synthetic antioxidants, although this assertion is often proven false. Oils used in the United States and Europe undergo stringent quality controls to identify any contaminants and are often recycled, helping reduce levels of hexane buildup over time. If these oils are exposed to high heat for deep frying or industrial uses, however, toxic compounds could build up, which creates even greater risks.
Seed oils have come under scrutiny due to their high levels of omega-6 fatty acids, as this could contribute to inflammation in the body by being converted to arachidonic acid through metabolism by cells in our bodies. However, human studies have not supported this claim that higher omega-6 concentrations are harmful or inflammatory.
Seed oils do have some advantages, but for maximum nutrition, it’s best to get your fat from whole food sources like fish (salmon, mackerel, and herring), nuts, seeds, and legumes. Also, make sure to select non-GMO versions whenever possible; GMOs may have negative health impacts that are best avoided. If you have any queries regarding specific fats, consult your Baptist Health primary care physician (you can locate one online through our provider directory).

Are Seed Oils the Healthy Fat Alternative?

Are Seed Oils the Healthy Fat Alternative?

Is Your Favorite Food Source Hiding in This Seed Oil?

Industrial seed oils found in most modern vegetable and cooking oils are vulnerable to rancidification due to being rich in polyunsaturated, which are susceptible to oxidation during refining processes, on store shelves, or when cooking food in a skillet. Oxidized fats have inflammatory effects and contribute to disease; additionally, these highly processed oils often contain unsavory additives or chemicals.
Fast food diets contain processed oils that increase your risk for chronic diseases. To lower this risk, opt for unprocessed and whole-food alternatives when selecting fast-food items.
Seed oils can be found in many packaged foods, from salad dressings to crackers. Many have high smoke points for high-heat cooking methods like frying and have long shelf lives for making processed goods with lasting appeal.
Seed oils have long been misinterpreted by experts as potentially unhealthy foods, yet this criticism stems from misreading research. While omega-3 fatty acids found in these oils are beneficial, some omega-6 fatty acids found therein can raise heart disease risks. Some experts even compare seed oils with trans fats, but such comparisons are unhelpful and inaccurate.
Canola, safflower, and corn oils are considered seed oils because they are produced by pressing seeds. These oils have low saturated fat levels while providing an even balance of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids.
Though fats present in these oils may provide many health benefits, they should not form the core of your diet. Calorie-dense oils don’t contain any protein or fiber – one tablespoon of any of these oils provides 120 Calories with zero Carbs or Protein and 14 Grams of Fat!
Canola or safflower oil is an excellent way to increase your vitamin E consumption safely. Most Americans fall short of their recommended amount, so canola or safflower oil is an easy and safe way to get more vitamin E into your system. Just be careful to steer clear of trans fats – which could contribute to cardiovascular disease risks.

Is Your Favorite Food Source Hiding in This Seed Oil?

Is Your Favorite Food Source Hiding in This Seed Oil?

Is Your Favorite Food Contaminated with Seed Oil?

Seed oils are refined vegetable-based fats made of canola, sunflower, safflower, and corn oil that have often been chemically extracted to produce oil for further processing with chemical additives and bleaching agents. Many people worry that seed oils contain dangerous hexane levels as well as synthetic antioxidants or trans fats that build up in their bodies, but most of these nasties are removed during processing and refining processes – it is even possible to find organic or unrefined seed oils!
Some critics suggest that seed oils are inflammatory due to their abundance of omega-6 fatty acids, which may turn into arachidonic acid and support compounds that promote inflammation. Unfortunately, however, research on lab animals cannot provide conclusive proof in humans.
Seed oils often receive criticism due to being high in omega-6 fats but low in omega-3s, the latter of which are known to help decrease blood triglycerides, prevent irregular heartbeats, and decrease inflammation. Most people get enough omega-3s through fish, walnuts, and chia seeds in their diets.
The demonization of seed oils has an intricate origin story that includes elements of paleo eating, clean eating, and conspiracy theories. Social media hype combined with limited clinical evidence led to its demonization.
Some social media influencers have been spreading the message that seed oils are harmful and contribute to numerous health concerns, even creating hashtags to raise awareness on this subject. Unfortunately, such hashtags have come under criticism from nutritionists and the scientific community.
Seed oils should only be consumed in moderation; they should not form the basis of your diet. The best way to limit exposure to these oils is through eating more whole foods, such as fruits, vegetables, and lean proteins, while avoiding packaged food that contains seed oils – such as salad dressings, cookies, or crackers that contain this ingredient.

Is Your Favorite Food Contaminated with Seed Oil?

Is Your Favorite Food Contaminated with Seed Oil?

Have You Been Cooking with This Surprising Ingredient?

Seed oils are a general term referring to any oil extracted from seeds and used for both domestic cooking and the manufacturing of industrial foods. Examples of seed oils are soybean, canola, palm, peanut, safflower sunflower, and corn oils; together, they’re known as “vegetable fats.
These oils can be found in a range of food products, such as fast foods and baked goods, salad dressings, and many salad bars. Omega-6 fats tend to be higher than anti-inflammatory omega-3s; nonetheless, high-fat oils don’t necessarily represent poor health; nonetheless, it is important to choose healthier oils when cooking at home.
Seed oils have often been criticized as harmful. It’s essential to understand where this notion of harm stems from and whether its basis lies in research or opinion. Some may assume that eating seed oils could lead to chronic illness; however, there is no concrete evidence supporting such claims; rather, they likely stem from social media rhetoric and their usage in processed food with high sugar, salt, and saturated fat levels.
Some experts have linked seed oils with inflammation due to their abundance of omega-6 fats that are converted to arachidonic acid – an inflammatory fat known to increase inflammation markers in the body and can contribute to various diseases. However, recent research indicates that linoleic acid, the main omega-6 found in seed oils, does not cause this inflammation directly.
Seed oils may not be as healthy as olive or coconut oils, but many still see their value. Although not as nutritionally dense, seed oils have their uses, such as baking and flavor-enhancing hot dishes. Plus, they’re easy to store and affordable!
Be mindful that eating processed and fried food sources of seed oils is likely part of your diet, thus it’s crucial to focus on whole food consumption while limiting packaged products as much as possible.

Have You Been Cooking with This Surprising Ingredient?

Have You Been Cooking with This Surprising Ingredient?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.