Unleash the Power Of Seed Oil: a Must-Read Guide

By Tom Seest

What Are Some Surprising Uses Of Seed Oil?

At SeedOilNews, we help people that are seed oil curious by collating information and news about seed oils.

Seed oils, also known as omega-6-rich vegetable oils like corn, soy, sunflower and canola oil, should not exceed two tablespoons in any 2000-calorie diet diet; too much seed oil consumption may contribute to obesity and chronic disease risks when used for cooking or in ultraprocessed food products.
But the issue may go deeper: modern diets contain too little omega-3 than omega-6 in their omega-3 to omega-6 ratio ratio, leading to imbalanced intakes of both.

What Are Some Surprising Uses Of Seed Oil?

What Are Some Surprising Uses Of Seed Oil?

Is Soybean Oil Hiding in Your Favorite Foods?

Soybean oil is one of the most widely-used cooking oils in the US, found in numerous packaged food items and used for homemade salad dressings, sauteed vegetables and baked goods. Unfortunately, concerns exist regarding its high linoleic acid content which may increase chronic inflammation risk factors that increase heart disease risk, cholesterol levels and obesity rates.
As part of the process to convert soybeans to soybean oil, they are refined to remove impurities and make it suitable for use. The end product is a neutral tasting oil with high smoke point; commonly used to prepare various food items while also being utilized in beauty products and cosmetics; in fact it even serves as an ingredient in baby formula!
Seed oils have long been associated with health risks. Their image has been marred by claims made by various elements, including those within the paleo movement, clean eating initiatives and conspiracy theories. But is it accurate to claim these fats are harmful and dangerous for health?
Seed oils are refined vegetable oils rich in omega-6 polyunsaturates, and have become an integral part of American diets since manufacturers started substituting animal fats with seed oils in order to cut costs and extend shelf life.
Though seed oils contain more omega-6 than omega-3 fatty acids, there is no evidence to support that their consumption causes health risks when taken in moderation. Most people can get enough omega-6 from whole food sources such as nuts and seeds.
Seed oils present a serious challenge because they are commonly found in processed food products that contain salt, sugar and saturated fats – contributing to weight gain and other health problems. If you reduce consumption of such items, chances are good you’ll feel much better overall.
Soybean oil can be part of a healthy, well-rounded diet when used responsibly and in moderation. It provides essential proteins and healthy fats that may help prevent hair fall while encouraging regrowth, in addition to maintaining normal blood pressure levels and decreasing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Is Soybean Oil Hiding in Your Favorite Foods?

Is Soybean Oil Hiding in Your Favorite Foods?

Is Canola Oil Really a Healthy Choice?

Seed oils such as canola have received unjustifiably bad press; however, when used moderately they’re perfectly safe. Any claims that seed oils are toxic or harmful stem solely from social media influencers without any evidence from scientific studies. Fatty acids found in seed oils (canola, safflower and generic “vegetable oil”) play an integral part of any well-balanced diet.
Seed oil producers use a process called flaking, which ruptures the cells to release oil. Once flaked seeds are hot, they’re put through various presses or expellers in order to extract it – including some that use chemical solvents such as hexane which could form harmful compounds when exposed to heat or light.
Seed oils pose one primary worry due to the large quantities of omega-6 inflammatory fats they contain, which may disturb the delicate balance between omega-3 and omega-6 fats in our bodies.
Omega-6 fats deserve their share of praise when it comes to heart health, too. Omega-6 fatty acids can help lower blood pressure, decrease irregular heartbeat risk and suppress inflammation – all contributing to reduced risk for chronic disease.
Most Americans consume too much omega-6 fat from processed food such as fast food and fast snacks, with too much coming from omega-6 sources like processed snacks. Eating foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids – like wild-caught fish, nuts and seeds – may help balance out this ratio.
As with all cooking oils, it is wise to use seed oils sparingly and limit how long you heat them for. Heat can cause fats to become rancid, which isn’t good for your arteries. The best way to tackle this problem is storing cold and not using them again for frying; other fats such as olive or avocado oil would work just as well if possible. When selecting seed oils be sure to opt for non-hydrogenated varieties and limit how hot they’re heated at.

Is Canola Oil Really a Healthy Choice?

Is Canola Oil Really a Healthy Choice?

Did You Know Sunflower Oil is a Versatile Ingredient?

Sunflower seeds are an abundant source of oil used for many culinary applications. While most seed oils contain various forms of fats, sunflower seed oil tends to be high in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) while low in saturated fatty acids (SFAs). While some experts have touted its health benefits, others have cautioned of potential dangers associated with these kinds of oils; physician Cate Shanahan in 2020 made headlines when she named eight varieties as “The Hateful Eight,” warning about their high concentration of polyunsaturated PUFAs which contribute to inflammation, accumulation of body toxins in body fat storage as well as chronic health conditions like arthritis or even heart failure.
Sunflower oil’s nutritional status depends on its fatty acid profile and production process. All varieties contain MUFAs, PUFAs and saturated fatty acids in some quantity – though their proportions can differ widely depending on its quality when sold as finished product.
One of the best types of sunflower oil is slowly expeller-pressed and unrefined, where temperatures don’t typically go beyond 120deg Fahrenheit to keep more of its flavor and nutrition intact. Plus, due to its higher MUFA content it has less chance of experiencing oxidative damage that causes rancid smells or other unwanted side effects – this kind can typically be found from small organic producers or specialty stores.
Sunflower oil made from seeds specifically bred to produce more oleic acid is another type of sunflower oil derived from seeds bred for increased monounsaturated fatty acid production, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine. It also boasts lower ratios of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids than other varieties and boasts vitamin E content to provide protection from oxidative stress.
If you prefer sunflower oil that’s non-GMO or certified organic, look for products with these labels to ensure the product meets even higher standards of trustworthiness.

Did You Know Sunflower Oil is a Versatile Ingredient?

Did You Know Sunflower Oil is a Versatile Ingredient?

What Makes Sesame Oil a Must-Have Ingredient?

Sesame oil is made by pressing sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum), often harvested by harvesters for their oil content. Due to its powerful, bold flavor, sesame oil has long been a staple ingredient in Chinese and Japanese cooking as well as dressings and marinades across Asia. Untoasted varieties have a delicate, neutral flavor while darker varieties feature deeper, richer notes with their earthier essence adding depth and earthy taste to sauces or salad dressings.
Seed oils shouldn’t be seen as the villains they are often made out to be; it’s just important that we make informed choices when selecting them. When looking for sesame oil, opt for pure versions free from additives and fillers; organic cold-pressed versions have greater nutritional value than those processed using heat, high pressure, chemical solvents or hexane; purchase at health food stores or Asian markets for maximum freshness.
Sesame oil stands out for its abundance of lignans, which act as powerful antioxidants to defend against cell damage and oxidation of its oils. Furthermore, these anti-oxidants possess anti-inflammatory properties and help maintain healthy cholesterol levels in the blood.
Studies have demonstrated that replacing traditional saturated fats with sesame oil can significantly decrease total and LDL cholesterol, as well as triglyceride levels, as well as body weight and belly fat, both of which are known risk factors for heart disease.
Importantly, while some research suggests that increasing consumption of sesame oil can help manage blood sugar, it is still wise to consult your physician prior to adding this oil into your diet as too much of this could cause it to decrease too quickly and potentially be dangerous for diabetics or people with high blood pressure.
Note that sesame oil is one of the eight most-common allergens and could be responsible for contributing to nut allergies. If this is your situation, avoid sesame altogether and find alternative ways of adding flavorful dishes without using sesame oil as much.

What Makes Sesame Oil a Must-Have Ingredient?

What Makes Sesame Oil a Must-Have Ingredient?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.