Unlock the Power Of Seed Oils

By Tom Seest

What Are the Benefits Of Seed Oils?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are seed oil curious by collating information and news about seed oils.

Many people see graphs on social media that appear to link the consumption of ultra-processed foods containing seed oils with poorer health outcomes; however, these do not demonstrate causation.
Heating seed oils does produce harmful chemicals (hexane). Restaurants frequently reuse this oil, creating more risks. But for personal cooking at home, using these oils in moderation should not pose any problems.

What Are the Benefits Of Seed Oils?

What Are the Benefits Of Seed Oils?

What Can We Find Seed Oils In?

Many people report experiencing improvements after discontinuing seed oils, including increased energy levels, improved mood, and less pain. They also find their cravings for sugary processed foods such as junk food reduced, thus promoting more body fat burning while providing additional body lubrication from healthy fat sources (like avocados, coconuts, olives, and butter) instead.
Seed oil critics claim that omega-6 fatty acids present in seed oils increase inflammation. Linoleic acid from these oils converts to arachidonic acid, which in turn forms arachidonic acid, which forms building blocks of proinflammatory compounds; however, this theory only holds up when applied to rodent research; human studies have not confirmed linoleic acid as the cause.
An inherent problem of industrial seed oils is their wide use in ultra-processed foods, including packaged baked goods, protein bars, chips, and salad dressings. Furthermore, they’re often refined to remove phytochemicals beneficial to health while creating trans fats – further disproportional to their benefits for our bodies and producing trans fats as trans fatty acids; plus, they quickly oxidize under heat exposure, creating toxic byproducts that become dangerously addictive!
Seed oils sourced from genetically modified crops present a serious concern. Such farming depletes soil and farmland while contributing to climate change; at the same time, it enriches Big Food, Big Seed, and Big Agriculture companies with unsustainable practices.
Experts contend that the primary problem lies with our intake of ultra-processed foods containing sugar, saturated fats, salt, and chemical additives – an unhealthy eating pattern that is linked with chronic diseases. One way to lower consumption is by switching your diet to prioritize nutrient-dense food sources while cutting back on processed ones; when choosing cooking oils such as canola oil, you should choose cold-pressed varieties rich in omega-3 fatty acids and monounsaturates so as to meet daily oil recommendations still (2 tablespoons for 2000 calories of diet). In this way, you will still get your daily oils while simultaneously lowering the risks associated with diseases.

What Can We Find Seed Oils In?

What Can We Find Seed Oils In?

Are Seed Oils Really Unhealthy?

Seed oils are a staple of most people’s diets and can be found in packaged food such as salad dressings, chips, crackers, and french fries. Seed oils also provide polyunsaturated fats essential to our health; two primary examples being linoleic acid and omega-3 fatty acids, which need to be consumed at optimal amounts to function optimally within our bodies.
Contrary to what may be spread via social media influencers and conspiracy theorists, there is no credible clinical research showing seed oils are unhealthy or toxic. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend two tablespoons per day in a 2000-calorie diet plan as part of an appropriate meal plan; in moderation, however, whole foods such as avocados and nuts contain more nutrition than refined vegetable fats.
One of the chief complaints against seed oils is their high omega-6 to omega-3 ratio, leading to chronic inflammation. Unfortunately, however, these claims are based on studies conducted with rodents rather than any actual clinical evidence proving this theory. It is true that some omega-6 fats – such as linoleic acid found in most seed oils – convert into arachidonic acid, which may contribute to inflammation; however, only a small percentage is converted into this form in our bodies, and this should not cause major problems.
Refining processes used to produce seed oils release harmful byproducts such as trans fats. Because of this, some people choose not to consume seed oils because of these harmful byproducts; however, no scientific evidence has linked these chemicals with health risks; instead, it seems likely that high intakes of refined seed oils in ultra-processed food lead to negative health outcomes primarily because these products also contain excessive sugar, salt, and additives.
Many individuals who discontinue seed oils report feeling better, including being able to lose weight more easily, having more energy, and being less irritable. Others report experiencing clarity, decreased headaches, and less sugar cravings.

Are Seed Oils Really Unhealthy?

Are Seed Oils Really Unhealthy?

Are Seed Oils Inflammatory?

Some nutrition influencers are asserting that seed oils are toxic and linked with everything from heart disease to brain fog, but is there actually an issue here?
People often become critical of oils due to the high levels of pro-inflammatory omega-6 fats found in them, yet we need these fats as part of a balanced diet containing nuts, seeds, olives, avocados, and fish.
Seed oils are widely used in processed food because of their higher smoke point than other vegetable oils, making them suitable for applications like frying and sauteing. Furthermore, due to their long shelf lives, they’re an excellent choice when creating casseroles or sauces that need long cook times such as casseroles.
Problematic oils come from destructive mono-crop agriculture and GMO crops that pollute our environment, creating chronic health issues as well as environmental destruction. Ultra-processed food industries rely heavily on these oils, leading to further environmental destruction and chronic health concerns for consumers.
People who dislike seed oils have begun replacing them with animal fats such as tallow and butter; this could have dire health repercussions as these fats have been linked with adverse health outcomes compared with seed oils.
Fatty fish, nuts, and seeds contain fats that provide us with essential fiber, vitamins, and minerals, all essential for overall well-being.
Limit or avoid seed oils altogether and choose healthier fat sources like extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil, or avocado oil instead. The Dietary Guidelines recommend getting at least 2 tablespoons per day from these healthy sources; but the key point is limiting processed food that usually contains seed oils by switching over to eating a whole food diet that emphasizes fruits and vegetables while emphasizing natural ingredients as much as possible.

Are Seed Oils Inflammatory?

Are Seed Oils Inflammatory?

Is Seed Oil Dangerous?

Seed oils (commonly referred to as vegetable oils) are edible oils derived from seeds such as sunflower, corn, cottonseed, and safflower. You’re likely familiar with them from packaged food items or restaurants containing them or for home or industrial food manufacturing use. Their production involves collecting oil-rich seeds of plants before superheating them until their fatty acids “oxidize,” then covering them with various chemicals to mask their awful color and smell before being “hydrogenated”; this chemical process leads to rancid oils becoming rancid and toxic oils that can damage cells and lead to diseases like cancer or heart disease.
Seed oils have long been recommended as they contain high concentrations of omega-6 polyunsaturated fats, such as arachidonic acid, that may contribute to inflammation in the body. While much research on omega-6s has been conducted with laboratory animals, no correlation between eating them and chronic diseases has yet been observed.
One common argument against these fats is that they contain harmful toxins due to being extracted with harsh chemicals like hexane that are believed to be dangerous for both workers and the environment. But this claim rests on unsubstantiated claims; Hexane does not form oil-soluble contaminants and only lasts in the air for short amounts of time before dissipating into thin air.
Overall, experts advise eschewing seed oils in favor of eating more nutrient-dense foods like olive, coconut, and avocado oils instead. Some plant-based oils derived from whole food sources are okay in moderation; simply strike a balance between healthy fats, proteins, complex carbohydrates, fruits & veggies to meet Dietary Guidelines recommendations.

Is Seed Oil Dangerous?

Is Seed Oil Dangerous?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.