Unlocking the Mysteries Of Seed Oil Production

By Tom Seest

What Is Seed Oil Processing?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oils by collating information and news about seed oils.

Cooking often relies on seed oils like canola (rapeseed), grapeseed, rice bran corn, and safflower oil for our culinary needs.
These oils contain omega-6 fatty acids, which have been proven to contribute to inflammation. Thankfully, Cultured Oil offers healthy alternatives that may serve as an excellent replacement.

What Is Seed Oil Processing?

What Is Seed Oil Processing?

How Does Chemical Extraction Affect the Quality of Seed Oils?

Seed oils are extracted from plant seeds (including grapeseed, soybean, cottonseed, and more). Common uses for these oils include culinary applications, as they contain high levels of dietary fats that provide a healthier alternative to saturated fats found in meat products.
Not all cooking oils have the same effects on our health; therefore, it’s crucial that we understand their processing methods to choose an oil suitable for our meals. This knowledge could make all the difference!
Chemical extraction or solvent extraction is the most cost- and environmentally efficient means of extracting oil from seeds.
It offers several advantages over other methods, including reduced energy costs and maintenance expenses and being able to reuse extracted oil. Furthermore, this technique is ideal for large-scale operations as it works with many different oilseed types.
Step one of chemical extraction involves selecting an ideal solvent to extract material. This depends on its composition and concentration of miscella; ultimately, it should dissolve oil and other compounds present within seeds more easily than possible.
Temperature should also be taken into consideration; higher temperatures increase oil solubility, making extraction faster than with cooler solvents.
Thirdly, consider the amount of solvent. A higher proportion is typically required when extracting seeds with higher miscella concentration than seeds with lower miscella content; this is because more miscella will remain after extraction than in seeds with lower miscella concentration.
At this point, oil is extracted by applying a solution of non-volatile solvent (usually petroleum benzin but sometimes commercial hexane or heptane) over the meal and heating to 212o F (100o C) to be distilled off.

How Does Chemical Extraction Affect the Quality of Seed Oils?

How Does Chemical Extraction Affect the Quality of Seed Oils?

Is Small-Scale Pressing the Key to High-Quality Seed Oils?

Small-scale pressing of seed oils utilizes mechanical pressure to extract oil from raw material, with the process being clean, safe, and hygienic without the use of chemicals or waste products. It is suitable for producing edible oils such as rapeseed oil, canola oil, and vegetable oil for human consumption.
There is an assortment of presses designed specifically for small-scale or home production available for purchase or hire, both domestically as well as abroad. One popular type is the single-cylinder screw press (Figure 2).
Cold presses are commonly used to cold-press rapeseed, canola, sunflower seed, and linseed oilseeds; however, certain models also allow cold pressing of sesame, peanuts, groundnuts, poppy seed cottonseed, and jojoba oils.
Selecting the proper press for your needs is of utmost importance. For example, if you are a farmer who will process 10 tons per day of seed, selecting one with sufficient capacity over selecting something larger that may not meet all your requirements is key.
The moisture content of seeds is another crucial factor when considering press performance. An optimal moisture level for pressing is 6-8%; experience has revealed that canola presses work best at around 7-8%. If moisture drops below this range, however, then pressing won’t take place, and seeds won’t press through the press head properly.
Additionally, tip diameter plays an integral part in oil press operation. Too large of a tip allows feedstock to pass too freely through and not be held back enough by the press, leading to little oil extraction, while too small of a tip clogs up its end and prevents operation.
There are various small presses on the market today; most come equipped with various tips to press a variety of feedstocks. Certain models are specifically tailored to cold-pressing rapeseed oil for canola oil production, while others can press more diverse items such as soybean and flax seed oil production.

Is Small-Scale Pressing the Key to High-Quality Seed Oils?

Is Small-Scale Pressing the Key to High-Quality Seed Oils?

Are Seed Oils Processed in a Healthy Way?

Commercial presses are widely used to produce high-grade seed oil for various industrial, cosmetic, and engine fuel uses. Common ingredients used include cottonseed, linseed, olive, palm, corn, peanut, and soy oils.
These seeds are usually harvested raw and cleaned, shelled, or broken down further before heating to condition the end product for maximum quality output. This process may need to be repeated several times for optimal results.
Once the hulls have been removed, seeds are crushed or pressed to extract most of their moisture and some of their oil; these two steps represent the key stages in any standard seed oil production process.
After pressing, the meal obtained is mixed with hexane and heated to extract more oil from its seeds. This slurry is collected and eventually refined using various chemical processes.
Refining processes often incorporate bleaching, deodorizing, and other steps that make the end product more desirable. Bleaching is one such step used to quickly eliminate minor constituents of oil that cause its flavor or color to change quickly.
Additionally, certain oils may be treated with solvents to eliminate remaining water content – this practice is common with engine fuel oils.
Solvents that are commonly employed include hexane, octane, butylated hydroxyanisole, and butylated hydroxytoluene. These solvents can help remove water from fatty acids in oil, allowing more lubricating properties to remain, decreasing friction while prolonging its lifespan.
Solvents can also help reduce free radical levels in oil, which are responsible for the oxidation of lipids that lead to rancidity or other issues.
Though these processes aren’t the only options available to small-scale producers, they’re most often chosen and utilized. These processes tend to be less costly and demand fewer resources than large-scale edible oil companies.

Are Seed Oils Processed in a Healthy Way?

Are Seed Oils Processed in a Healthy Way?

Is Your Favorite Seed Oil Really Refined?

Refining is the process of extracting impurities from substances, usually petroleum products such as oil and gas. Refining plays an essential role in protecting engine components while simultaneously decreasing pollution in the environment.
Seed oils contain polyunsaturated that make them vulnerable to oxidation, an action that produces free radicals and other potentially dangerous chemicals that make them unhealthy for consumption, so it’s wise to avoid their use when cooking and preparing food.
Seed oils can be refined in many different ways; deodorizing and bleaching are both options, as is refining to remove odors, colors, and bitter flavors from them.
Refining seed oils begins by treating them with chemicals to strip away undesirable fatty acids and contaminants that cling to them, then heating the oil to between 107 to 188 degrees Fahrenheit (40 to 85 degrees Celsius) while adding an alkaline additive such as sodium hydroxide or sodium carbonate to it.
After the oil has been extracted, it needs to be degummed using hot water heated between 188 and 206 degrees Fahrenheit (85 and 95 degrees Celsius), steam, or acidified water; this process is known as rehydration, and it removes most of its gums.
After this step, the oil is dried and filtered to remove any trace of soap before being packaged and sold or otherwise distributed to users.
Seed oils make up an important component of American cuisine, providing omega-6-rich vegetable oils from various plants and are used for everything from infant formula to salad dressing.
These oils can be harmful because of their presence of inflammation-inducing linoleic acid, which has been linked to heart disease, cancer, and dementia. Furthermore, their production contributes to deforestation and climate change by spreading agricultural pests that harm forests.
Coconut oil and dairy fats offer healthier alternatives to seed oils; however, neither are always readily available as convenient foods – you may need to visit a grocery store or farm stand instead.

Is Your Favorite Seed Oil Really Refined?

Is Your Favorite Seed Oil Really Refined?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.