Uncovering the Hidden Oils

By Tom Seest

What Oils Aren’t Derived From Seeds?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oils by collating information and news about seed oils.

Many who cut seed oils out of their diets report feeling better and losing weight, yet it’s often hard to attribute these results solely to eliminating seed oils when other processed foods high in sugar, salt, and fat are being eaten at the same time.
Seed oils pose a problem not because of themselves but because of their prevalence in highly processed food products that lack essential nutrients and contain too many unhealthy fats.

What Oils Aren't Derived From Seeds?

What Oils Aren’t Derived From Seeds?

Discover the Benefits of Seed Oils!

Many health-conscious individuals know to avoid fats of all sorts. Seed oils have long been considered unhealthy due to an imbalance between omega-6 fatty acids (such as canola, corn, and cottonseed) and omega-3s that result in inflammation-causing health conditions like arthritis or cardiovascular issues.
Seed oils have become increasingly prevalent in both packaged food products and restaurants, making up approximately 10% of our caloric intake1. They make up one of the main fat sources found in our diets in America; some of the more prevalent seed oil-based cooking oils include soybean, canola, sunflower, safflower, and corn oil.
These seeds are then either mechanically extracted, chemically extracted, or chemically refined to create the oils we use in cooking and food processing, subsequently going through additional processing to make them taste and smell better or extend shelf life. Unfortunately, many of these refined, bleached, and deodorized oils contain fewer health benefits than their raw, unprocessed counterparts.
Others argue that seed and vegetable oils should be consumed sparingly; registered dietitian nutritionists usually advise eating small amounts for essential fatty acid intake.
When purchasing these oils, try to purchase organic and non-GMO versions, as these tend to be healthier alternatives than their more processed counterparts. When selecting cold-pressed or expeller-pressed variants of oils for consumption, look for ones made using cold-pressing technology or expeller-pressing methods; cold press provides superior nutrition when compared to its more processed alternatives.
Industrialized foods tend to contain additives, preservatives, sugar, and industrial seed oils – the hallmarks of junk foods – which contribute to chronic health problems. Therefore, it’s best to consume industrialized fats in moderation while prioritizing whole foods like vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, fish, and lean meats over processed versions. When choosing such products as snacks or processed versions.

Discover the Benefits of Seed Oils!

Discover the Benefits of Seed Oils!

What Benefits Do Not Seed Oils Offer?

No matter the seed oil type–canola, rapeseed (used in the United Kingdom), safflower, corn, or soybean–it all contains polyunsaturated fatty acids. Some types of these PUFAs have been linked with health issues, while others (notably omega-3 fatty acids) can reduce heart disease risk factors and help improve overall cardiovascular well-being. Overall, seed oils are considered healthier alternatives to animal products like lard or butter that contain saturated fats.
Recently, some prominent health and nutrition bloggers have advised their followers to avoid seed oils because of their high concentration of omega-6 fatty acids that could cause inflammation as well as raise their risk of obesity and chronic diseases.
These experts assert that omega-6 fatty acids in seed oils can be converted to compounds known as arachidonic acid in the body, which promote inflammation. According to this theory, heart disease, joint pain, and other conditions are possible outcomes of eating too many omega-6 fatty acids; however, other research indicates otherwise and suggests consuming a diet high in omega-6s has no negative health ramifications.
An additional concern with many seed oils is their processing methods. Refining, bleaching, deodorizing, and heating to high temperatures all add up to give them a higher smoke point, making them suitable for use in processed snacks and meals. Unfortunately, however, these processes may introduce other harmful chemicals, like hexane. Those concerned about health impacts from this exposure should opt for cold-pressed or expeller-pressed oils instead.
Though it is best to limit seed oils, particularly in large amounts, they should not be seen as nutritional villains. When consumed sparingly and combined with other healthy fats like olive oil, they can actually provide valuable omega-3 fatty acid sources. Their real danger lies in ultra-processed food items made with them, which may lead to an imbalance of nutrient intake, leading to chronic illness risk. To limit these harmful fats in your diet, try choosing whole food items as much as possible and limit packaged items so your diet remains as balanced as possible.

What Benefits Do Not Seed Oils Offer?

What Benefits Do Not Seed Oils Offer?

How Can Not Seed Oils Impact Your Health?

Recently, there has been much discussion surrounding seed oils being harmful, especially from “wellness influencers.” The reasoning for this claim mainly originates in their omega-6 fats, which may contribute to chronic inflammation in your body.
To combat this, some people suggest eliminating dairy altogether and opting for oils like olive and avocado oils that contain anti-inflammatory properties instead. While their advice may seem sensible at first glance, it should be remembered that such diet advice could potentially prove misleading and even detrimental in terms of overall health benefits.
Seed oils pose no nutritional threats themselves; their use can be a source of conflict. Their high heat threshold makes them perfect for high-heat cooking methods such as frying and sauteing; this explains why you’ll find them used extensively in commercially fried foods as well as ultra-processed packaged snack foods with seemingly unlimited shelf lives.
As such, they’re commonly included in highly processed meals that tend to be high in sugar and salt while low in fiber and phytonutrients – leading to weight gain as well as health issues such as heart disease, diabetes, depression, and even cancer.
Oils heated repeatedly may begin to break down and produce toxic compounds that are detrimental to human health, most likely as seen in restaurants where the same oil is reused time after time; if used as part of home cooking only once, then this should not present a problem.
If you want to cut seed oils from your diet, it can be easily accomplished by cutting back on ultra-processed food and opting for healthier oils such as extra virgin olive and avocado oil instead. Over time, this change may even improve how you feel; those who make this switch often report feeling less bloated, more energetic and have greater mental clarity as a result of making the change.

How Can Not Seed Oils Impact Your Health?

How Can Not Seed Oils Impact Your Health?

What Are The Benefits of Not Using Seed Oils?

Seed oils are widely used for cooking at home and in restaurants, constituting a large source of fat in an average person’s diet. Seed oils also supply large quantities of omega-6 fatty acids that may disrupt our bodies’ equilibrium between omega-6s and omega-3s and lead to inflammation.
Contrary to what some TikTok influencers may claim, seed oils aren’t all bad. Seed oils may contribute to an imbalance of omega-6 fatty acids in modern diets due to excessive consumption of ultra-processed food products containing them rather than due to any intrinsic problems with these particular oils themselves.
Seed oil critics tend to focus on one specific fatty acid called linoleic acid that converts into arachidonic acid in the body and may contribute to inflammation, yet if someone consumes plenty of other omega-3 fats through food such as fish or nuts, then just this one fatty acid won’t cause inflammation.
Another potential risk associated with refined vegetable and seed oils is their production process, which may strip away protective phytochemicals. Furthermore, some refiners employ chemical processing techniques that produce byproducts such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and peroxides that increase heart disease risk, but most refined vegetable and seed oils such as canola, safflower, soybean, and sunflower oils undergo stringent quality controls tests to make sure they contain no unwanted elements.
Some people claim they feel better after giving up seed and vegetable oils, yet there is no good evidence linking these to health problems. Many of their concerns may simply stem from guilt by association and misinterpretation of research findings.
Fat is essential to human health. While excess saturated fat should be avoided, we all require healthy fats such as those found in olive, avocado, and other plant-based oils and omega-3 fatty acids for our overall well-being. A primary care provider at Baptist Health can assist you with any questions about fat in your diet; visit our provider directory online or reach out directly for answers from one of their registered dietitian nutritionists.

What Are The Benefits of Not Using Seed Oils?

What Are The Benefits of Not Using Seed Oils?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.