Unlock the Health Benefits Of Seed Oils

By Tom Seest

Which Seed Oils Are Best for Health?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oils by collating information and news about seed oils.

Seed oils (canola, corn, cottonseed, soybean, sunflower, safflower, and rice bran) are commonly found in processed food like fries, pastries, donuts, and chips; they’re also linked with chronic health conditions like heart disease and diabetes.
But contrary to what you may have seen on social media, oils aren’t all evil; in fact, some may even be good for your health!

Which Seed Oils Are Best for Health?

Which Seed Oils Are Best for Health?

What Benefits Do Seed Oils Offer?

Seed oils include canola (also referred to in the UK as rapeseed oil), peanut, sesame, soybean, sunflower cottonseed corn, and rice bran oils – the most popular cooking oils in America. Critics point out that seed oils contain higher amounts of omega-6 fatty acids, which promote inflammation. They suggest replacing them with omega-3 fats such as those found in salmon or nuts instead.
Refined seed oils typically undergo a refining process that makes them stable at high temperatures – hence their use in frying – while also stripping out some phytochemicals with potential antioxidant and other health benefits. Unrefined versions tend to be healthier options as they retain some of these beneficial compounds.
All oils contain a mixture of saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fats in various proportions, but many believe seed oils differ by being higher in omega-6 — particularly linoleic acid — which some believe causes inflammation and contributes to chronic conditions like heart disease, obesity, and depression.
Of course, most people consume too many processed foods that contain seed oil-derived fats, like french fries and packaged snacks that contain too many processed carbs, sugar, and sodium, but this issue cannot be solely blamed on one food or oil source; rather it results from several contributing factors including sugar consumption, lack of whole grain consumption as well as types and amounts of fat we ingest.
Why it matters: To avoid issues related to diet, try to limit processed food containing seed oils. Eat more whole foods such as fruits and vegetables along with lean proteins and healthy fats from seeds, nuts, and avocado. If your diet concerns are growing too large for you to handle alone, speak to a registered dietitian or your doctor, who can develop an eating plan tailored specifically to you.

What Benefits Do Seed Oils Offer?

What Benefits Do Seed Oils Offer?

What Benefits Can Seed Oils Provide?

Seed oils have recently received considerable criticism, with social media influencers criticizing them as harmful to health. Unfortunately, much of this negativity stems from guilt by association and misreading of research findings.
Seed oil critics point out that seed oils contain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). This group includes omega-3 and omega-6 fats. Omega-3s can benefit heart health, while omega-6s regulate blood pressure and lower inflammation within the body; both are essential for brain health. Unfortunately, too much consumption of omega-6 PUFAs from seed oils or ultra-processed foods could create an unbalanced ratio of PUFAs in your diet.
Other concerns relate to the manufacturing processes for these oils, such as using chemical solvents such as hexane for extraction. Hexane can be harmful when inhaled and has been linked with health conditions like asthma; however, most restaurants and industrial deep fryers don’t heat these oils to levels where toxic compounds will form; also, they’re typically reused multiple times before becoming exposed to extreme temperatures again and again.
Seed oils pose another potential concern: when combined with sugar and salt, seed oils can become part of a diet high in calories, sodium, and saturated fat – leading to obesity as well as chronic illnesses like cardiovascular disease and diabetes.
Since most issues related to seed oils stem from overconsuming and an imbalance in fatty acids, they don’t necessarily pose health risks when used sparingly. Sauteing and roasting vegetables, as well as salad dressings, is the ideal use of them; avoid adding them for making crunchy snacks such as fries. Doing this will allow you to get your recommended intake (about two tablespoons in a 2000-calorie daily diet).

What Benefits Can Seed Oils Provide?

What Benefits Can Seed Oils Provide?

Are Seed Oils Bad for Your Health?

Seed oils are an integral part of the daily diet, from drizzles of canola oil over your salad to adding them to stir-fries with broccoli in sunflower oil. While some health influencers may try to convince us otherwise, seed oils should only be consumed moderately as part of a well-rounded meal plan.
Seed oils have an interesting history that spans the paleo diet movement, clean eating trends, and conspiracy theories. It all began with a blog post from LA-based nutritionist and social media influencer Dr. Cate Shanahan that claimed high PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acid) seed oils weaken immune systems and contribute to diseases like heart disease.
She claims she lacks medical training or credentials to back her claims, and the evidence does not support them. For instance, her claim that linoleic acid turns into arachidonic acid in rodents’ bodies to increase inflammation is supported only by studies in rodents, not humans; similarly, her other claims (PUFA seed oils leading to weight gain and depression, etc) lack any clinical backing.
Consumption of foods that contain seed oils, like packaged snacks and fast food, tends to be high in sodium, sugar, and unhealthy fats; so while cutting them out of your diet might make you feel better overall, its effects likely lie more with caloric reduction and other factors than those associated with seed oils themselves.
If you do decide to cut out seed oils, try swapping in other healthy fats such as olive oil and avocados as replacements. When cooking with seed oils, choose oils made using physical processes rather than heat or chemicals; these tend to be less inflammatory and more flavorful than those heated in hot machines. Furthermore, opt for cold-pressed varieties whenever possible – though more costly, but made without chemical extraction processes that damage nutrients.

Are Seed Oils Bad for Your Health?

Are Seed Oils Bad for Your Health?

Are Seed Oils Safe For You?

Seed oils can be found in many food products, some of which may be healthier than others. Unfortunately, seed oils tend to be overused in ultra-processed items that contain large amounts of sugar, salt, and fat, like french fries, onion rings, cookies, and donuts – leading to weight gain as well as various health conditions like heart disease when consumed excessively.
Seed oils have garnered criticism because of their abundance of omega-6 fatty acids, which can be converted to pro-inflammatory arachidonic acid in the body and contribute to chronic diseases such as cardiovascular illness and depression. Critics suggest this inflammatory process as being responsible for these chronic ailments.
However, evidence supporting these claims is relatively scant; most evidence stems from animal studies conducted on rodents. Furthermore, modern diets typically lack an ideal ratio between omega-3s and omega-6s, creating an unhealthy pattern of eating that should concern us far more than any one food or oil in isolation.
Another concern with these oils is their poor nutritional profile; most varieties offer only about 120 calories per tablespoon with no proteins, carbs, or fiber – and 14 grams of fat! They may also contain additives like soy lecithin, TBHQ, and dimethylpolysiloxane, which could lead to allergic reactions for some individuals.
These days, the best course of action is to reduce the consumption of unhealthy oils by switching them to healthier ones like olive or avocado oil for sauteing and other high-heat applications. Unrefined versions may also provide added protection by not going through chemical processing that removes protective compounds such as vitamin E and phenols that refinements can.
As they have a lower smoke point and are stable at room temperature, these oils can be useful in cold applications like salad dressing. If you are concerned about consuming too many omega-6 fatty acids in your diet, switch up to more whole food sources of omega-3s such as salmon, tuna, and walnuts.

Are Seed Oils Safe For You?

Are Seed Oils Safe For You?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.