Vegetable Oil: Uncovering Its Hidden Dangers

By Tom Seest

What Are the Dangers Of Vegetable Oil?

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Vegetable oils, made from plant sources such as canola, soybean, corn, or avocado oils, are widely used for frying foods as well as in processed and packaged goods worldwide.
Vegetable oils differ from their natural fat counterparts in that they’re produced using toxic chemicals like hexane that can cause dizziness, nausea, and headaches when extracted using conventional means. Watch this video to witness the process by which vegetable oils are made!

What Are the Dangers Of Vegetable Oil?

What Are the Dangers Of Vegetable Oil?

Trans Fats: How Unhealthy Are They?

Vegetable oil refers to any form of food-grade cooking oil made from plants or seeds, including canola, sunflower, peanut, and soy oils. Vegetable oils can be found in salad dressings, deep-fry foods, and flavorings for baked goods.
Vegetable oils contain polyunsaturated fats (PUFA). While these polyunsaturates may help lower cholesterol and protect against heart disease risk, excessive consumption could contribute to weight gain as well as other adverse health conditions.
Too much vegetable oil consumption is detrimental to our bodies and can increase the risk of heart disease and death due to PUFAs being susceptible to oxidation when exposed to heat – leading to inflammation that contributes to cardiovascular disorders as well as other illnesses.
Heat will convert PUFAs to trans fats, which have long been considered detrimental to human health. Trans fats increase cholesterol levels, lead to clogged arteries, and contribute to other heart issues; additionally, vegetable oils contain many artificial components, making them unnatural and dangerous for your body.
Vegetable oils, though often advertised as being healthier alternatives to saturated fats, should still be avoided as much as possible. They have the same adverse effects on heart health as saturated fats do and often consist of multiple oils blended together, which further compound their detrimental impact.
To produce vegetable oils, seeds, and plants must first be extracted through chemical processes that include degumming, refining, bleaching, and even hydrogenation in some instances, such as margarine and spreads. Furthermore, many vegetable oils contain additives or preservatives in order to prolong shelf life and extend their shelf life.

Trans Fats: How Unhealthy Are They?

Trans Fats: How Unhealthy Are They?

Cholesterol: Is Vegetable Oil Really That Bad?

Vegetable oil is a generic term referring to any number of plant oils processed from soybean and corn sources, the two most frequently found. They’re frequently used in salad dressings, mayonnaise, baked goods, and fast food cooking as they have high smoke points with an affordable price point and easy availability in grocery stores – plus, fast food service providers often rely on vegetable oils as part of their product offering.
Vegetable oils contain omega-6 fatty acids that may increase inflammation and contribute to cancer and cardiovascular disease, as well as trans fats, which raise cholesterol and block blood vessels. Many people mistakenly choose these oils, believing them to be healthier when in reality, they could actually be harmful.
Vegetable oil is generally free from saturated fats but can still contain potentially artery-clogging trans fats created during partial hydrogenation of liquid vegetable oils into solid form – the same process that produces vegetable shortening like Crisco. While FDA requirements now stipulate that foods labeled as “vegetable” oil must contain no trans fats whatsoever, many still do contain trans fats in them.
If you want to avoid hydrogenated vegetable oils, be on the lookout for those listed as ingredients on their ingredient lists – these are likely the most dangerous of them all.
Although some health professionals advocate the consumption of vegetable oils as being heart-healthy, studies conducted through large randomized control trials revealed they can actually increase your risk of death. According to one such trial, those who swapped animal fats with vegetable oils had a 62% greater chance of dying over seven years than other lifestyle factors like smoking or an inactive lifestyle.
Vegetable oils are typically extracted using harsh chemicals that remove nutrients while leaving chemical residues behind. Once extracted, these impurities must then be refined away with additional chemicals; this process often causes the oil to oxidize, causing inflammation in body tissues as well as increased body heat, which alters their properties and may change the structure of fats and alter their properties; heated oils may even become rancid and therefore unsafe to consume.

Cholesterol: Is Vegetable Oil Really That Bad?

Cholesterol: Is Vegetable Oil Really That Bad?

What Makes ‘It’s Not Natural’ Vegetable Oil So Unhealthy?

Vegetable oil refers to oils produced from seeds such as canola, sunflower, corn, safflower, peanut, soybean, and avocados or found naturally in avocado, olive, and coconut products. Most commercially produced vegetable oils consist of combinations of these seed oils. Vegetable oils have only recently become part of our daily lives due to technological advances that enabled their mass production – previously; most people relied on animal fat sources like butter lard or tallow as sources of their daily calorie needs.
Unfortunately, these so-called healthy vegetable oils are highly processed and far from natural. Many start out as raw, oily plant material like seeds or fruit pits treated with chemicals to extract their oils before being chemically degummed, refined, bleached, and deodorized before hitting grocery store shelves – leaving consumers with highly unnatural foods that should be avoided as much as possible.
Vegetable oils contain high amounts of Omega-6 polyunsatured fatty acids (PUFAs), which have anti-inflammatory effects on our bodies and easily oxidize when exposed to heat, making them detrimental to health. They promote inflammation in our bodies, contributing to cardiovascular disease, arthritis, asthma, and other chronic illnesses.
Comparable to more natural fats like coconut and olive oils, vegetable oils often exhibit an extremely rapid oxidation rate, thus leading to rapid rancidification. Therefore, it’s wise to limit their use whenever possible.

What Makes 'It's Not Natural' Vegetable Oil So Unhealthy?

What Makes ‘It’s Not Natural’ Vegetable Oil So Unhealthy?

How Unhealthy Is Vegetable Oil?

Vegetable oil might make you think of rich nutrients and fiber, but that would be wrong: most vegetable oils are produced using genetically modified soybeans, corn, and canola that have been processed heavily while often combined with toxic solvents during production.
Products from refining can be highly unstable, breaking down quickly when exposed to heat or light. To protect yourself from this scenario, purchase unrefined oils stored in dark glass bottles.
Vegetable oils can be dangerous due to their abundance of Omega-6 polyunsatured fatty acids (PUFAs), which promote inflammation. One reason vegetable oils are bad is due to these pro-inflammatory molecules: arachidonic acid production increases due to these PUFAs and may contribute to heart disease, diabetes, and obesity, among other chronic illnesses.
Additionally, many vegetable oils come from genetically modified plants or seeds, which may pose potential health hazards. Furthermore, making vegetable oils use hexane, which has been linked with dizziness, headaches, fatigue, and muscle weakness in small doses when exposed regularly – even small amounts may lead to significant adverse side effects.
Researchers published in Trends in Food Science and Technology found in 2021 that when heated, some vegetable oils can produce compounds that damage cells and may increase your risk of cancer. This evidence supports the notion that processed vegetable oils are unhealthy no matter where or how they’re consumed in a diet.
Experts agree that saturated and monounsaturated fats are among the safest sources for decreasing cancer risks. According to one landmark study from the Los Angeles Veterans Administration Medical Center, participants in one group who consumed diets rich in vegetable oil experienced 82% more cases than those who didn’t consume so much vegetable oil saw.
Although vegetable oils should be avoided entirely, other healthy cooking fats like butter, ghee, lard, and coconut oil are safe choices when mixed into an otherwise whole foods-based diet in small quantities – just check the label and select organic or non-GMO options where possible.

How Unhealthy Is Vegetable Oil?

How Unhealthy Is Vegetable Oil?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.