Uncovering the Health Risks Of Seed Oils

By Tom Seest

Is Eating Seed Oil Bad for Your Health?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are curious about seed oils by collating information and news about seed oils.

If you follow social media nutritionists or read nutrition books, you might have come to know that seed oil is detrimental to health. They claim it contains omega-6 fatty acids which contribute to inflammation and should therefore be avoided.
That is due to how our bodies use linoleic acid, an omega-6 fat found in most seed oils, to produce arachidonic acid – an inflammatory amino acid.

Is Eating Seed Oil Bad for Your Health?

Is Eating Seed Oil Bad for Your Health?

Are Omega-6 Fatty Acids Bad For You?

Seed oil made from pressed seeds like soybeans and canola contains various essential and non-essential fatty acids that may lead to negative health outcomes in some studies.
There’s no perfect balance of omega-6 and omega-3 fats; however, to stay healthy, you should strive to limit processed oils containing too much omega-6. In general, aim for foods low in saturated fats but rich in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids.
Linoleic and arachidonic acids are two major types of omega-6 fatty acids, each playing unique roles in our bodies. Linoleic acid (LA) provides building blocks to molecules that promote inflammation, while arachidonic acid provides anti-inflammatory compounds.
Today’s omega-6 fatty acids often come from industrially processed vegetable oils that contain many double bonds between carbon atoms, making them more vulnerable to rancidity and damage than before. Furthermore, such double bonds increase oxidative stress and may contribute to cardiovascular disease, obesity, or premature death.
omega-6 fatty acids have long been a controversial subject in nutrition. Critics suggest they can contribute to inflammation and other health concerns; proponents claim omega-6s are necessary for good health.
Numerous large studies have established that people who consume more linoleic and arachidonic acids in their blood are at lower risk of heart disease and other health complications, while more recent research shows that those who eat plenty of omega-3 fatty acids from food like fish and flaxseeds contain significantly fewer omega-6s in their bodies than those who don’t consume such foods regularly.
Though most Westerners consume too many omega-6 fatty acids and not enough beneficial omega-3s, eating whole foods containing both types is key to staying healthy. So rather than fretting over seed oil specifically, consider increasing your consumption of fish, nuts, chia seeds, and olive oil instead.

Are Omega-6 Fatty Acids Bad For You?

Are Omega-6 Fatty Acids Bad For You?

Is Linoleic Acid in Seed Oil Beneficial or Detrimental?

Linoleic acid is an essential fatty acid found in vegetable oils and nuts that reduces cholesterol and promotes heart health, yet when consumed in excess, it may increase inflammation, reduce immunity, or even raise cancer risks when taken in large amounts.
Modern Americans consume far more linoleic acid than ever before due to the proliferation of industrial seed oils like canola and corn oil, which contain anywhere between 30-70% linoleic acid and can be found in foods as diverse as bread, cheese, frying oil, and pre-packaged and prepared foods.
Studies published in PLOS One indicate that diets high in linoleic acid could have an inflammatory impact on the body. Researchers monitored blood levels of linoleic acid, arachidonic acid (another omega-6 fatty acid), and two markers of inflammation among men and women fasting for 12 hours.
Researchers found that when they examined the red blood cells of people with high levels of linoleic acid, their levels of inflammation markers were higher than people with lower amounts. This could be because more of it had been converted to other compounds, which caused further inflammation throughout their bodies.
This information isn’t new, and this study represents only one among many studies showing the impact of linoleic acid on inflammation. However, it should be remembered that these are observational studies without randomization, making them unsuitable for measuring effects such as heart disease or mortality risk.
Instead, a healthy diet should incorporate foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids while low in linoleic acid content – such as salmon, mackerel, herring, tuna, sardines, and wild-caught fish (tofu), nuts seeds and legumes (including eggs, chia seeds, walnuts almonds); moderate exercise, plenty of sleep and water consumption should all play key roles.

Is Linoleic Acid in Seed Oil Beneficial or Detrimental?

Is Linoleic Acid in Seed Oil Beneficial or Detrimental?

What Toxic Byproducts are in Seed Oil?

Though seed oils are promoted as heart-healthy fats, industrial seed oils contain harmful byproducts, including oxidized byproducts, trans fats, and chemicals that could pose risks.
Seed oil manufacturers employ high heat to oxidize the fatty acids present in seeds, producing an oil with little nutrition and an unpleasant odor. They then add petroleum-based solvents such as toluene to extract it. Such solvents have been linked with health conditions like cancer, asthma, and pulmonary diseases.
These dangerous toxins are present in numerous processed food items, such as salad dressings, margarine, and mayonnaise. Furthermore, they’re commonly used in baked goods and snacks.
Seed oils can be toxic for both you and the environment. GMO oils contribute significantly to deforestation, contributing significantly to climate change and leading to deforestation in their wake.
Seed oils are highly unstable and susceptible to rancidity, being polyunsaturated and therefore breaking down easily into more proinflammatory molecules, leading to their swift oxidization and degradation compared with saturated fats like butter or ghee. For these reasons, these two options should be preferred over seed oils as sources of nutritional fats.
These foods also tend to contain more omega-6s than omega-3s, leading to an imbalance that has been linked with increased risks of heart disease, cancer, dementia, and other health conditions.
As such, it’s vital that you avoid these oils if you want to prevent chronic diseases and improve your health. Either eliminate or limit their consumption.
To reduce your intake of seed oils, choose olive or coconut oil instead. These lesser-processed oils have more clinical evidence supporting their health benefits.
Conclusion: All industrial seed oils should be avoided. This includes canola (rapeseed), corn, cottonseed, soyabean oil, and sunflower seed oil, which have all been widely linked with health issues ranging from respiratory issues and high cholesterol to soy allergy and asthma symptoms. On social media, these eight are sometimes referred to as the “Hateful Eight” and have even been blamed for contributing to certain forms of dementia and dementia.
These oils contain high levels of inflammation-inducing linoleic acid, which has been linked to heart disease, cancer, and other illnesses. Furthermore, omega-6 fatty acids associated with these oils promote further inflammation, leading to weight gain. If you want to lose weight successfully it’s best to completely exclude toxic oils from your diet; focus on eating natural and nourishing whole food instead.

What Toxic Byproducts are in Seed Oil?

What Toxic Byproducts are in Seed Oil?

The Potential Risks of Seed Oil: Is It Safe?

If you follow health trends on social media and podcasts, you may have come across “the hateful eight.” This term refers to eight oils such as canola, corn, cottonseed, sunflower, safflower grapeseed and rice bran that have been identified by many social media influencers as potentially toxic for health – this has led to allegations that these can lead to leaky gut and brain fog as well as heart disease and diabetes.
Seed oils contain little nutritional value and contain harmful chemicals that could negatively impact your health. Instead, opt for healthier oils like olive, coconut, or avocado oil instead.
These oils contain a range of fatty acids, from omega-6 and omega-3 to essential fatty acids such as lauric acid. A balance in these fatty acids is necessary for optimal body functioning.
Most people do not consume enough omega-3 fatty acids – an essential nutrient found in olive oil, nuts, and fish – which reduce inflammation in their bodies and increase the risk for various diseases. This shortage increases body pain and puts you at increased risk.
Seed oil contains omega-3 fats, which are less inflammatory than other oils, and it provides a source of vitamin E, an essential antioxidant that protects cells in your body from damage.
Unfortunately, most oils on the market today are highly refined and thus dangerous to your health. Refining removes beneficial compounds while producing small amounts of trans fats.
Concerns with vegetable oils have also arisen because they are heated at high temperatures, which oxidize the seeds’ fatty acids, producing byproducts that may be unhealthy. When using these oils as part of a recipe that will be cooked at high temperatures, only use them sparingly.
When selecting cooking oils, make sure they possess a high smoke point – this indicates they can withstand high heat without disintegrating into rancidity quickly. Most cooking oils fall between 250degF and 400degF on the scale.
These oils make an excellent salad dressing ingredient, but their high concentration of saturated fat means they should not be used in food preparation. Instead, these oils work better when sauteing or grilling but don’t lend themselves well to baking.

The Potential Risks of Seed Oil: Is It Safe?

The Potential Risks of Seed Oil: Is It Safe?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.