Unlock the Surprising Health Benefits Of Olive Oil

By Tom Seest

What Are the Benefits Of Olive Oil As a Seed Oil?

At SeedOilNews, we help people who are seed oil curious by collating information and news about seed oils.

Seed oils, produced from canola, sunflower, safflower, and soybean plants, are among the most sought-after cooking oils.
Oils contain essential fats for healthy diets. The Dietary Guidelines recommend including two tablespoons per day when following a 2000-calorie diet plan.

What Are the Benefits Of Olive Oil As a Seed Oil?

What Are the Benefits Of Olive Oil As a Seed Oil?

What Makes Seed Oils Unique?

Seed oils are cooking oils made from extracting seeds of various plants, such as canola, corn, soybean, safflower, and grape seed oils. Common examples include canola, corn, soybean, safflower, and grape seed oils – they’re often less expensive than olive oil while boasting mild taste profiles and higher smoke points, making them popular in home kitchens.
Refining techniques are typically employed to extract these oils before packaging and selling them for use in cooking, baking, and soap making, as well as in cosmetic manufacturing or even for frying prepared food such as potato chips and French fries.
Many people believe that consuming oils in moderation is beneficial since they provide essential omega-6 fatty acids and other essential nutrients. But the reality is they’re not always the healthiest choice, and it’s best to prioritize nutrient-rich foods like fish, nuts, seeds, and legumes in your diet instead.
Seed oils‘ main drawback lies in their abundance of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which have been linked to inflammation and chronic diseases, particularly by disrupting the omega-3:omega-6 ratio in the body.
An imbalance can contribute to health conditions like cardiovascular disease and diabetes, so it’s crucial that as much seed oil as possible be avoided in diet. One effective strategy to lessen your dependence on these oils is limiting ultra-processed food products containing them.
Although some studies have linked seed oils with increased risks of cardiovascular disease, others indicate that moderate consumption could help protect against inflammation-based illnesses and have positive effects on brain health. Nutritionists and doctors alike often recommend them due to their anti-inflammatory properties.
Although cooking oils have health risks, when used moderately, they can be an economical choice and an excellent way to add extra nutritional benefits into our diets. Unrefined versions such as sunflower and canola seed oils offer plenty of vitamin E, phenols, and other protective compounds – as an additional bonus!
When selecting a healthier fat for cooking and baking, extra virgin olive oil should always be preferred over seed oils due to its more nourishing nature and lower omega-6 to omega-3 ratio compared with other vegetable oils.

What Makes Seed Oils Unique?

What Makes Seed Oils Unique?

Can Olive Oil Be Toxic?

Seed oil refers to any vegetable-derived oil derived from plants such as sunflower, canola, safflower, and grapeseed oil – among others.
No matter what you may hear about seed oils, they are neither dangerous nor toxic to your health. While not an ideal replacement for healthier fats like olive oil, avocado oil, and coconut oil, seed oils provide essential fatty acids needed by your body.
Also found in these foods are beneficial omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids that can support overall health by providing the necessary balance to excess polyunsaturated fats that contribute to inflammation in your diet.
Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that adults consume approximately two tablespoons (120 calories) of oil daily, such as olive oil, extra virgin coconut oil, or seed oils rich in omega-3 fatty acids.
If you want to add extra nutrition to your oil consumption, opt for unrefined seed oils like canola or sunflower. They don’t go through as extensive refining processes as refined ones and, therefore, retain beneficial phenols and protective compounds that contribute to health benefits.
However, it’s essential to steer clear of highly processed or hydrogenated seed oils that contain trans fats as these are often present in packaged foods such as cookies, candy bars, granola bars, cereals, and sauces; thus, it is crucial that we read labels closely when purchasing packaged goods containing such oils.
Social media users seem to be spreading misinformation that seed oils are harmful, but there’s no definitive proof to back this claim up. Instead, this misperception may simply stem from miscommunication and confusion.
Studies indicate that seed oils are not toxic at all and may even benefit your health. If you prefer, try switching up your fat sources – nuts, seeds, or avocados could all provide beneficial lipids!
Seed oil can be an economical cooking choice compared to more costly oils, providing you with ample opportunities for sauteing, baking, and drizzling salad. Plus, its rich source of monounsaturates and polyunsaturates offers more nutrition.

Can Olive Oil Be Toxic?

Can Olive Oil Be Toxic?

How Much Fat is in Olive Oil?

Olive oil is one of the healthiest and most nutrient-dense oils available, boasting high amounts of monounsaturated fat and antioxidants as well as abundant amounts of vitamins E, potassium, and calcium.
As well as being rich in antioxidants, olive oil is also an excellent source of oleic acid – a heart-healthy polyunsaturated fat known for lowering cholesterol and relieving inflammation. Other great sources include canola, safflower, and high oleic sunflower oils.
Seed oils have long been misunderstood as being harmful when, in reality, they’re an integral component of a balanced diet. According to a heart health guide published by the CDC, they’re an excellent source of essential omega-6 fatty acids, which have been shown to lower LDL (bad) cholesterol and raise HDL (good) levels.
But for more beneficial oils, extra virgin or unrefined varieties may be the better option as these contain essential compounds lost during refining processes, including phenols and vitamin E.
However, they also possess a higher thermal tolerance, making them ideal for frying or other forms of cooking. Due to rapid oxidization at room temperature and the potential risk of repeated removal from the refrigerator, it’s wise to store them in a dark location for best results.
Sesame oil offers another healthy choice, providing an ideal ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids. Try it in Asian stir-fries or noodle dishes!
Rosehips are an excellent source of vitamin B6 and magnesium, two essential elements for warding off osteoporosis. Plus, their delicious flavoring agent can add depth and character to sauces and salad dressings alike!
Vegans and lactose-intolerant individuals should opt for low-sodium versions of seed oils to lower the risk of kidney stones and bladder issues, while lactose-intolerant individuals should refrain from consuming vegetable oils with milk as their base.
Substituting unrefined vegetable oils with seed oils in recipes is also an affordable alternative; unrefined ones tend to be cheaper.
Avocados, nuts, and seeds all provide ample monounsaturated fat. Chia seeds, in particular, are an excellent source of omega-3 alpha-linolenic acid and can be added to various recipes and baking applications for an additional source.

How Much Fat is in Olive Oil?

How Much Fat is in Olive Oil?

What are the Health Benefits of Olive Oil?

Search seed oils on social media apps, and you will likely come across claims that these fats are toxic and detrimental to health, including allegations that they cause weight gain, chronic inflammation, and heart disease. There has even been a movement claiming this as well.
Some critics contend that the refining process for these oils, using heat and solvents such as hexane, makes them even more harmful than they appear. Furthermore, synthetic antioxidants, trans fats, and peroxides may be present.
However, seed oil manufacturers conduct stringent quality controls before selling it to consumers. These tests aim to detect chemicals that could make us sick, such as hexane and unstable molecules.
Filtration processes are used to remove impurities from the oil and make it more affordable.
A diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids from seafood sources such as tuna and salmon and omega-6 fatty acids from plant sources like nuts, seeds, and vegetables is key for overall wellness and balance. Furthermore, whole food sources contain many antioxidants and other nutrients that protect polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in seed oils from becoming damaged.
One major reason to steer clear of seed oils is their high level of linoleic acid, an omega-6 fatty acid known to contribute to chronic inflammation in the body. Linoleic acid converts into arachidonic acid in our system; due to this inflammatory response, many consider seed oils harmful, according to Guy Crosby, Ph.D., a Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health adjunct associate professor of nutrition.
Seed oils contain high concentrations of linoleic acid while often lacking omega-3 fatty acids – this could increase your risk for obesity, heart disease, and dementia.
If you want to lower the inflammatory omega-6 fatty acids found in seed oils, replacing them with other healthier oils like extra virgin olive or coconut can be helpful in maintaining an ideal omega-6:omega-3 ratio. These oils have more research supporting their health benefits and may even help balance out this ratio for you.

What are the Health Benefits of Olive Oil?

What are the Health Benefits of Olive Oil?

Be sure to read our other related stories at SeedOilNews to learn more about seed oils.